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ORGANIC GARLIC Announcement Posted on 05 Jul 06:33 , 0 comments

 
Mary's Heirloom Seeds
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Sent out July 1, 2017
Did you plant Organic Garlic last year?  If you did, don't forget to let it cure after harvest. 

We are planning and mapping out our gardens for our next Organic Garlic planting.  I was so impressed at how well our raised beds grew this past season that we're expanding into several new beds this October.

**Please read:  We are now allowing customers to reserve their Organic Garlic before anyone else.**
Very Important:  Please be sure to read our ordering info at the top of our Organic Garlic page.
 
ORDERING ORGANIC GARLIC 

The information provided below is available on our website.  Please read before purchasing organic garlic

Pre-Orders: July thru August 20th are scheduled to ship out October 1st

ALL Order placed after August 20th will ship out after October 30th. Organic garlic will be available for purchase until October 15th unless we are sold our before that date. *Subject to change* 
All of our Garlic varieties are sourced from  Certified organic growers and grown in the USA

***PLEASE READ***
As we ship on a first come, first serve basis, your order may not ship until days or weeks later. You will receive an email when your order ships.

Last year we sold out in Mid-September and were unable to accept additional orders.

Please purchase additional items in a separate order.  ALL orders containing organic garlic will ship TOGETHER after October 1st
We are unable to ship our garlic outside of the United states
Garlic varieties @
Mary's Heirloom Seeds  
 
HARDNECK
Rocambole garlic has wrappers that are typically reddish in color, such as Killarney Red.  However, color is not the only requirement for this category, as some varieties may be white or purple colored. Rocambole scapes are more tightly curled than other varieties.  Most rocambole varieties produce 8 to 10 cloves per head.

SOFTNECK
Softneck garlic, also called artichoke garlic due to their numerous cloves that give them an appearance similar to the "petals" of an artichoke head, is the most common garlic due to its excellent storage characteristics.  This is the kind you will find in grocery stores.   
**Softnecks are the most heat tolerant of garlic, and have a sweeter, milder flavor than hardnecks.  If you're looking to make garlic braids, this is the type to grow.
Inchelium Red is a softneck variety 
 
JUST A TIP: Soak garlic cloves in Organic Kelp Meal and water for 2 hours before planting.



Not a Garlic variety but also available for pre-order and scheduled to ship out in September: FRENCH RED SHALLOTS

 

One important factor in planting garlic is PLANNING AHEAD.  First, because garlic takes 6 months or more to grow so you'll need a suitable spot.  Second because organic garlic bulbs are not available year-round. 
There is usually a short window to purchase "seed garlic" and then it's gone.

 
At Mary's Heirloom Seeds we offer "pre-orders" of Organic Garlic from July thru August 20th.  This allows customers to reserve their garlic in advance before we have a chance to sell out.  We continue to accept orders of Organic Garlic thru October 15th but there is always a chance that we'll sell out before that date.


SUGGESTED PLANTING TIME FOR GARLIC

Please remember that these are "suggested" dates. You'll find that different sources might have different dates.  I tend to be a bit of a rebel gardener so I sometimes plant earlier and sometimes later. 


Central Midwest: October. Early November in a pinch

Gulf Coast: October thru November

Maritime Canada & New England: October

Mid Atlantic: October

North Central & Rockies: Late September and into October

Pacific Northwest: Late September and into October.  Early November in a pinch

Southern Interior: October. Early November in a pinch   
Southwest: October thru November

Alaska: September

Hawaii: Late September thru October

San Diego: October thru November

North Florida: October thru February 
Central Florida: October thru February 
South Florida: October thru February 
**October thru December might give you a better chance at a successful crop**
 

If you have additional questions please feel free to ask. 

 

Happy Planting,

 

Mary's Heirloom Seeds, P. O. Box 3763, Ramona, CA 92065

JULY SEED PLANTING GUIDE FOR THE US Posted on 22 Jun 16:00 , 2 comments

Mary's Heirloom Seeds Newsletter
JULY Seed Planting Guide for the US by Region


NEW ARRIVALS ADDED TODAY!


Also know as Naguri Squash. A winter squash variety. 
Portuguese sailors introduced kabocha to Japan in 1541, bringing it with them from Cambodia.



This beautiful heirloom comes from Turkey. The 3" round fruit are best cooked when they are green to light orange.


RECENT ADDITIONS:




   
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JULY is right around the corner and before you know it, it's time for FALL Planting!!!

Several customers have asked about Garlic
We will be offering Organic Garlic (seed garlic)
on July 1, 2017
Mark your calendar!
 
 
JULY Seed Starting Guide
for the US by Region
 

Arugula Bush & Pole Beans, Lima Beans, Beets, Brussels Sprouts, Carrots, Cauliflower, Celery, Sweet Corn, Endive, Pie Pumpkins, Radish, Radicchio, Summer Squash and Tomatoes
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY  Herb!! Don't forget the   Wildflowers!

Squash Blossoms
 

 
Sow Indoors: Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Celery, Pumpkin, Summer Squash, Winter Squash and Tomatoes
Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Beans, Cantaloupe, Sweet Corn, Cucumber, Melons, Mustard Greens, Southern Peas, Pumpkin, Summer Squash and Winter Squash
Transplant: Melons, Peppers, Pumpkin,  Summer Squash, Winter Squash and Tomatoes

 
 
Arugula, Beans, Beets Corn, Cucumber, Lettuce, Melons, Mustard Greens, Okra, Peas, Peppers, Pumpkin, Radish, Radicchio, Summer Squash, Swiss Chard and Cherry Tomatoes
Don't forget the  Wildflowers!
 

Cosmic Purple Carrot 
   
 

Sow Indoors: Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage  
and Cauliflower 
Sow Outdoors: Beans, Carrots, Collards, Cucumber, Okra, Peas, Pumpkin, Rutabaga and Winter Squash 
Transplant: Eggplant, Peppers and Tomatoes
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Don't forget the  Herbs  and   Wildflowers!

Small Sugar Pumpkin
 


Sow Indoors: Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Celery, Kale, Leeks and Lettuce
Sow Outdoors: Bean, Beets, Carrots, Chard,
Collards, Cucumber, Kale, Kohlrabi, Mustard Greens,
Okra, Peas, Radish, Rutabaga, Summer Squash,
Winter Squash and Turnips
Don't forget the Herbs  and  Wildflowers

RADISH in a few as 25 days
    
 
 
Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Beets, Carrots, Kale, Lettuce, Mustard Greens, Radicchio, Radish, Rutabaga, Scallions, Sorrel, Spinach and Turnips 
Transplant: Broccoli, Cabbage and Cauliflower
Don't forget the  Herbs  and  Wildflowers!

 

 
Sow Indoors: Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Kale, Kohlrabi and Lettuce
Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Beans, Beets, Carrots, CHARD, Collards, Cucumber, Endive, Kale, Leeks, Peas, Pumpkins, Radish, Rutabaga, Summer Squash, Winter Squash and Turnips
Transplant: Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Kale, Leeks, Lettuce and Turnips
Our Favorite Herbs:  Basil, Borage, Catnip, Chives, Cilantro, Dill, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Parsley
Don't forget the  Wildflowers!




Sow Indoors: Broccoli, Cabbage, Celery, Kale, Kohlrabi, Leeks and Lettuce
Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Beans, Beets, Carrots, CHARD, Endive, Kale, Lettuce, Mustard Greens, Radish, Rutabaga, Scallions and Turnip
Transplant: Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Celery, Endive, Kale, Leek, Lettuce,
Don't forget the Herbs  and  Wildflowers!

LETTUCE


Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Beans, Carrots, Corn, Cucumbers, Eggplant, Lettuce, Melons, Mustard Greens, Onions, Radishes, Rutabaga, Summer Squash, Peppers, Tomatoes and Turnips
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY  Herb!!! Don't forget the  Wildflowers!

PEPPERS


Sow Indoors: Eggplant, Peppers and Tomatoes
Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Beans, Corn, Okra, Peas, Pumpkin, Winter Squash and Watermelon
Transplant: Peppers and Tomatoes
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY  Herb!!! 
Don't forget  WILDFLOWERS!  
  

Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Beans, Beets, Broccoli, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Cucumber, Lettuce, Peas, Radish, Rutabaga, Spinach, Squash, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes and Turnips   
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Don't forget the  Wildflowers 
   
If you have additional questions please feel free to ask.  What will YOU plant this JULY?
 
Sincerely,                                   
Mary
The doctor of the future will give no medicine, but will interest her or his patients in the care of the human frame, in a proper diet, and in the cause and prevention of disease.
Thomas A. Edison 

 "The garden suggests there might be a place where we can meet nature halfway."
Michael Pollan 

Mary's Heirloom Seeds, P. O. Box 3763, Ramona, CA 92065

Grow 20-Pound Plants Our Ancestors Grew Posted on 17 May 12:47 , 0 comments

As a homesteader, we are always looking for old varieties of heirloom seeds to feed our family and animals.  I find that heirloom varieties have withstood the test of time and are plenty hardy to sustain our farming endeavors.  We've grown quite a few HUGE varieties of veggies here using beyond organic standards and eco-friendly practices.

We grew Zucchini that was over 16 inches long (Delicious zucchini bread, stir fry and zoodles from the big ones)
BLACK BEAUTY ZUCCHINI

We also grew Turnips that were almost 5 pounds!  
PURPLE TOP WHITEGLOBE TURNIP
*Most were about 1-2 pounds*


Our Fordhook Giant Swiss Chard became famous when it grew over 5 feet tall.  This isn't a normal size for swiss chard.  I let it grow to let it bolt and give me seeds


Mary's Heirloom Seeds now offers almost 500 varieties of heirloom seeds but today we're going to share with you about an OLD variety that can grow 20 pounds each.
 
Red Mammoth Mangel Beets produce an incredible mass of edible beet leaves and a large root up to 20 pounds or more in size!    These beets prefer deeply tilled, free draining, sandy soil to achieve full size. Simply allow your animals to graze on the tops, cut the tops for feeding or harvest the root. 

Fodder beets have been around since the 1400s if not earlier.  These beets were prized as nutritious animal feed that was easy to store.  Fodder beets are hardy, adaptable and palatable. They are ideal for planting in late summer for use as a winter and spring crop. 
Early harvested (smaller) Red Mammoth Mangel Beet
Mangel beets prefer neutral soil and are capable of thriving in less-than-ideal soil conditions. Full sun, however, is a necessity. Sow seeds directly into the prepared soil one month before the final frost date for early harvest, 10 to 12 weeks before the fall frost date for a late harvest. Seeds should be placed two inches apart and seedlings must be thinned out early. Rows should be spaced no less than 12 inches apart. A moderate amount of rainfall or irrigation is necessary for optimal growth to facilitate this, and a light covering of mulch may be necessary to retain moisture in drier climates.
 
The greens can be harvested at any time. Plucking a few leaves from each plant will not stress the root and will allow you or your livestock to enjoy nutrient-rich greens for many weeks. Carefully monitored and controlled grazing may be acceptable in the last few weeks before harvest.
 
Traditionally, mangel beets are not used as livestock fodder until January. During the time between harvest and January, certain components begin to break down in the root, making them easier to digest and less likely to cause digestive issues in your livestock.
 
To supplement your poultry feed and provide a pecking distraction, simply hang a beetroot in the coop. Greens can be fed to the poultry, as well. For other livestock, including cattle, horses, pigs and goats, beets are best sliced or cut into chunks before adding them in the daily ration of feed.
Are mangel beets edible for humans? Absolutely!  Just one crop of Mangel Beets (for us) is enough to store for an entire year of eating!
 
Last year we even grew a German Giant Radish that was over 12 inches long.  Again, we let it "bolt" and produce seeds but I wasn't expecting it to be so large.

 
Planning for the future is important. In the words of Jack Reacher (Lee Child), "Hope for the Best. Plan for the worst." While we cannot predict the loss of income, unexpected medical bills or car repairs, we should plan ahead and prepare the best we can.
 
You might also enjoy reading my article You Don't Need a Farm to Grow Food
 
If you're looking to grow large crops for fodder, the Red Mammoth Mangel Beet is a GREAT option.  If you're looking to grow bigger veggies, we can help.  You might like our article Easiest Veggies to Grow from Seed to Harvest and Feeding Your Plants-Updated.
 
If you have additional questions, please feel free to ask.
 

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Marys-Heirloom-Seeds/229833070442449

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MAY Seed Planting Guide for the US Posted on 26 Apr 07:29 , 1 comment

Before we get started with our MAY Planting Guide, we have a few specials to announce.
Genovese Basil and Sage will be on Sale thru May 10th

 

Mary's Heirloom Seeds
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NEW ARRIVALS
 



Helpful Links to
Get you Started    
April 25, 2017
In case you missed it, we offer region specific planting guide for entire year on our blog
Mary's 2017 Planting Guide


I don't know about you but sometimes even I need a reminder of what to plant next month.  Plus, we're always offering new specials and posting new seed varieties. 
NEW ARRIVALS
 We've added a few more heirloom seeds for MAY!
 
 
 
MAY SEED PLANTING GUIDE FOR THE US  

**Please keep in mind that this is a general recommendation for each region listed.  If your area is experiencing unusually extreme changes in weather you'll need to adjust and plant accordingly**




Arugula, Bush & Pole Beans, Lima Beans, Cantaloupe, Carrots, Corn, Cucumber, Eggplant (transplant), Endive, Gourds (Louffa),  Kale, Lettuce, Melons, Mustard, Okra, Bunching Onions, Bulbing Onions, Southern Peas, Peppers, Sweet Potato, Radish, Radicchio, Sorrel Spinach, Summer Squash, Tomato, and Watermelon.  
Herbs:
 Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow 
Pretty much EVERY  Herb!! Don't forget the Wildflowers!
Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Bush & Pole Beans, Lima Beans, Beets, Cabbage, Chinese Cabbage, Cantaloupes, Carrots, Cauliflower, Celery, Chard, Collards, Sweet Corn, Cucumber, Eggplant (transplant), Endive, Gourd (louffa) Kale, Kohlrabi, Lettuce, Leeks, Melons, Mustard, Peas-Snow or English, Southern Peas, Peppers, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Scallion, Sorrel, Spinach, Summer Squash, Winter Squash, Swiss Chard, Tomato and Watermelon.  
Herbs:
 Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow 
Pretty much EVERY  Herb!! 
Don't forget the  Wildflowers!
Arugula, Beans, Carrots, Celery, Collards, Corn, Cucumber, Endive, Kohlrabi, Lettuce, Melons, Mustard, OKRA, Peas, Peppers, Pumpkins, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Scallion, Sorrel, Squash, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes, Turnips and Watermelon.
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
 
Pretty much EVERY Herb! Don't forget the  Wildflowers!
Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Bush Beans & Pole Beans, Lima Beans, Beets, Cantaloupe, Carrots, Sweet Corn, Cucumber, Lettuce, Melons, Mustard, Bunching Onion, Southern Peas, Peppers, Sweet Potatoes, Radish, Radicchio, Spinach, Summer Squash, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes and Watermelon. 
Herbs:
 Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
 
Pretty much EVERY  Herb!! Don't forget the Wildflowers!


INDOOR planting for cooler/cold areas.  If your area is warming up or already warmed up, it might be time to plant outside! 
*If you are starting seeds indoors or in a greenhouse,  
you can plant just about anything*
 
Artichoke, Arugula, Beans, Beets, Broccoli, Cabbage, Carrots, Corn, Cucumber, Endive, Eggplant, Gourds (louffa), Leeks, Lettuce, Kale, Melons, Okra, Onions, Pak Choy, Peas, Peppers, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Scallions, Sorrel, Spinach, Summer Squash, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes, Turnips and Watermelon.
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
 
Don't forget the Wildflowers!
Arugula, Beans, Beets, Broccoli, Carrots, Collards, Corn, Cucumber, Gourds (Louffa), Leeks, Lettuce, Kale, Melons, Mustard, Okra, Onions, Peas, Peppers, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Scallions, Sorrel, Spinach, Summer Squash, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes, Turnips and Watermelon.
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Don't forget the Wildflowers!
Artichoke,Arugula, Beans, Beets, Broccoli, Cabbage, Carrots, Corn, Cucumber, Eggplant, Endive, Gourds (louffa), Leeks, Lettuce, Kale, Kohlrabi, Melons, Mustard, Okra, Onions, Peas, Peppers, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Scallions, Sorrel, Spinach, Summer Squash, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes, Turnips and Watermelon.
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cinlantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Don't forget the Wildflowers!
CONTINUE READING


Arugula, Beans, Beets, Carrots, Celery, Collards, Corn, Cucumber, Gourds (Louffa), Endive, Eggplant, Leeks, Lettuce, Kale, Kohlrabi, Melons, Mustard, Okra, Onions, Peas, Peppers, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Scallions, Sorrel, Spinach, Summer Squash, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes, Turnips and Watermelon.
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
 
Don't forget the Wildflowers!
Arugula, Beans, Beets, Broccoli, Cabbage, Carrots, Corn, Cucumber, Eggplant, Endive, Gourds (Louffa), Leeks, Lettuce, Kale, Kohlrabi, Melons, Mustard, Okra, Onions, Peas, Peppers, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Scallions, Sorrel, Spinach, Summer Squash, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes, Turnips and Watermelon.
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cinlantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Don't forget the Wildflowers!
Arugula, Beans, Beets, Broccoli, Cabbage, Carrots, Corn, Cucumber, Gourds (Louffa), Endive, Eggplant, Leeks, Lettuce, Kale, Kohlrabi, Melons, Mustard, Okra, Onions, Peas, Peppers, Radish, Scallions, Sorrel, Spinach, Summer Squash, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes and Turnips
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Don't forget the Wildflowers!

 ARIZONA  
 
 NEW MEXICO   
FLORIDA has been split in 3 regions 
 



If you have additional questions please feel free to ask. 

 

Happy Planting,

 

Mary's Heirloom Seeds, P. O. Box 3763, Ramona, CA 92065

Easiest Veggies to Grow from Seed to Harvest Posted on 19 Apr 08:24 , 1 comment

If you search the web, you'll find that many gardeners agree on the top easy veggies to grow. We all have our challenges and our favorites.


Last year, my best producer was the
Black Beauty Zucchini
Some of them grew over 18 inches long
(that's a wide-mouth quart jar for comparison)


You don't have to have a "farm" or land to grow food. If you're up to it, read my recent article "You Don't Need a Farm to Grow Your Own Food."


Just last year we posted about our Bucket Garden Project. "For this project, 100% of the buckets used are recycled. Some of the buckets were from previous projects and the yellow ones once held fresh kitty litter. The white buckets are food grade. The goal of this project to spend as little as possible and still grow food."

For simple seed starting, see our tutorial on



So let's get started!


People often ask, "What's the easiest veggie to grow?" For me, that's a tough one. If I had to choose just ONE, the easiest veggie with the best yield, it would have to be Swiss Chard. Swiss Chard is easy to grow from seed and provides continual harvest for several months after maturity. Swiss Chard can survive warm and hot climates so that's a plus.


What are the 9 Easiest Veggies to Grow?



Planting:
Soak seeds overnight in water before planting to ensure strong germination. Plant seeds half an inch deep and 3 inches apart. Set out seedlings 12 inches apart. Indoors or out, thin newly germinated seedlings with cuticle scissors instead of pulling them out. Chard seed capsules often contain two or more seeds. If more than one germinates, promptly snip off all but the strongest sprout at the soil line

Harvesting:
Twist off individual outer leaves and compost old leaves that have lost their glossy sheen. Three to five leaves can be picked from mature plants at a time, but be sure to leave the growing crown intact.

CHARD growing in a container

 

 


Radishes are a cool weather crop best planted in spring and autumn. Growing radishes during the hot summer months will cause them to bolt.

Planting: When preparing the planting bed, loosen the soil 6 to 10 inches deep, and mix in good compost or well-rotted manure. Sow seeds a half inch deep and 1 inch apart, in rows spaced 12 inches apart. After the seedlings appear, thin salad radishes to 3 inches apart; thin oriental radishes to 8 to 10 inches apart.

Harvest: Some Radish varieties such as Early Scarlet Globe radish can mature in as few as 22 days!
RADISH is a quick growing veggie!
From Mary's Blog:

 


Planting: All types of lettuce grow best when the soil is kept constantly moist, and outside temperatures range between 45 and 75 degrees Fahrenheit.

Prepare your planting bed by loosening the soil to at least 10 inches deep. Mix in an inch or so of good compost or well-rotted manure. Sow lettuce seeds a quarter of an inch deep and 1 inch apart in rows or squares, or simply broadcast them over the bed.

Harvest: Harvest lettuce in the morning, after the plants have had all night to plump up with water.
LETTUCE is a great container vegetable


For the sake of simplicity, I classify beans in 2 categories: Bush and Pole.

Bush beans are usually compact and grow close to the ground. Pole beans climb and require a trellis or other support. Bush beans tend to produce more beans in a shorter time, while pole beans will produce more over an entire season. Pole beans typically require much less.

Planting: Wait until well after the last frost before you plant the beans as they all like warm soil for germination. Plant the seeds about an inch below the surface and keep watered until the seed germinate

Harvest: Whether you grow pole beans or bush beans you will have an abundant harvest if you remember to pick regularly. Most beans are harvested before the seed grows too large, and the overall harvest will continue for many weeks if the beans are picked every day or so.
BEANS are one of my favorite!
From Mary's Blog:

 


Planting: In the spring, sow carrot seeds in fertile, well-worked soil about two weeks before your last frost date. In cool climates, continue planting every three weeks until midsummer. Sow your seeds about a quarter inch deep and 2 inches apart, in rows spaced at least 10 inches apart; carrots do well in double or triple rows. Thin seedlings to 4 to 6 inches apart, depending on the variety’s mature size.

Harvesting: Pull or dig spring-sown carrots when roots reach mature size and show rich color. Summer-sown carrots that mature in cool fall soil can be left in the ground longer, but should be dug before the ground freezes to preserve their quality
Delicious CARROTS
From Mary's Blog:

 


There are two types of cucumbers: slicing and pickling. Each type comes in several different varieties. The slicing types are long and usually grow to about 6 or 8 inches in length while the pickling types are shorter, reaching around 3 to 4 inches once mature.

Planting:
Thoroughly water the soil before plant­ing seeds half an inch deep and 6 inches apart. When the seedlings have three leaves, thin them to 12 inches apart, which is the spacing you should use if transplanting seedlings.

Harvest: To maximize production, harvest fruits as soon as they reach picking size. Pick daily, be­cause under ideal conditions, cucumber fruits can double in size in just one day. Use scissors or small shears to snip fruits with a short stub of stem attached.
Tiny CUCUMBER growing on the vine!
From Mary's Blog:

The two main things you can do to keep your summer squash plants healthy and productive are to provide plenty of water and to fertilize regularly. Water your plants when the top inch of soil is dry (test by poking your finger into the soil) and then, water deeply and gently so the water percolates down into the soil

Planting: Soak seeds in water for 24 hours before planting to ensure strong germination. Direct seed ½ to 1 inch deep into hills or rows.

Harvest: Harvest zucchini squash when the fruits are small. This will result in a more tender and flavorful squash.
Last year some of our ZUCCHINI grew HUGE!
From Mary's Blog:

 


There are two basic Types of Tomatoes: Determinate and Indeterminate.

Determinate tomatoes produce the fruit all at once. These are typically bush tomatoes, and make the best tomatoes for container gardening. Since all the tomatoes are ripe within a short period of time, these are great plant choices if you plan to can or have a short tomato growing season.

Indeterminate tomatoes grow on a vine. If properly cared for, will produce all season until the first frost.

For indoor seed starting: Start seeds indoors under bright fluorescent lights in early spring, about six to eight weeks before your last spring frost

Soak seeds in water for 24 hours before planting to ensure strong germination. Sow seeds 1/4 inch deep and gently cover with soil

The easiest way to grow tomatoes from seed is to plant seeds in small containers. Tomato seeds usually germinate in 5-14 days. Once seedlings are 4-8 inches tall, transplant into a 5-gallon container/bucket or into your garden.
Homegrown HEIRLOOM TOMATOES
From Mary's Blog:

 


Easy-to-grow beets do double-duty in the kitchen, producing tasty roots for baking, boiling or sautéing and fresh greens to boil or steam.

Planting: Begin planting beet seeds directly in the garden one month before your last spring frost date, followed by a second planting two to three weeks later. Beet seeds can germinate in cool soil, but they sprout best when soil temperatures are above 50 degrees

Start planting beets for fall harvest 10 to 12 weeks before your expected first fall frost.

Harvest: Beets can be harvested whenever they grow to the desired size. About 60 days are required for beets to reach 1 1/2 inches in diameter
Delicious BEETS
From Mary's Blog:

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SEED SALE & EARTH DAY Info Posted on 01 Apr 14:19 , 0 comments

Mary's Heirloom Seeds
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Join Our List
 
April 1, 2017
It's April 1st and there's no fooling going on here!  We've decided to offer another HUGE seed event to help you get a jump start on
Earth Day planting!
Our Sale starts TODAY and ends April 10th.
Seeds Listed below are $.99 to $2 each

 Many of you have asked about growing different varieties from seed so we'll continue to share our Growing Tips & Videos
EARTH DAY Info

From The Old Farmer's Almanac,

Ever wondered how Earth Day started? This observance arose from an interest in gathering national support for environmental issues.
In 1970, San Francisco activist John McConnell and Wisconsin Senator Gaylord Nelson separately asked Americans to join in a grassroots demonstration.
McConnell chose the spring equinox (March 21, 1970) and Nelson chose April 22.
Millions of people participated, and today Earth Day continues to be widely celebrated with events on both dates.
The most common practice of celebration is to plant new trees for Earth Day.
 
SEED SALE
April 1st thru April 10th
HELPFUL LINKS 
If you have additional questions please feel free to ask. 

 

Happy Planting,

 

Mary's Heirloom Seeds, P. O. Box 3763, Ramona, CA 92065

APRIL Seed Planting Guide for the US Posted on 31 Mar 05:54 , 0 comments

Are you ready for another in-depth seed planting guide for the US? 

At Mary's Heirloom Seeds it is our goal to help you grow the healthiest, most productive garden from heirloom seeds.  If you have additional questions, we are happy to help!

Mary's Heirloom Seeds
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NEW ARRIVALS
 



March 31, 2017
In case you missed it, we offer region specific planting guide for entire year on our blog
Mary's 2017 Planting Guide


I don't know about you but sometimes even I need a reminder of what to plant next month.  Plus, we're always offering new specials and posting new seed varieties. 
 Before we get started, we have lowered the cost
of 6 of our Starter Kits thru April 15th.

This is a great opportunity and  
they make great gifts!
APRIL SEED PLANTING GUIDE FOR THE US  

**Please keep in mind that this is a general recommendation for each region listed.  If your area is experiencing unusually extreme changes in weather you'll need to adjust and plant accordingly**




Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Bush & Pole Beans, Lima Beans, Cantaloupe, Carrots, Collards, Corn, Cucumber, Eggplant (transplant), Endive, Kale, Lettuce, Melons, Mustard, Okra, Bunching Onions, Southern Peas, Peppers, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Sorrel, Spinach, Summer Squash, Tomato, and Watermelon. 
Herbs:
Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY  Herb!! Don't forget the Wildflowers!
Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Bush & Pole Beans, Lima Beans, Beets, Cabbage, Chinese Cabbage, Cantaloupes, Carrots, Cauliflower, Celery, Chard, Collards, Sweet Corn, Cucumber, Eggplant (transplant), Endive, Kale, Kohlrabi, Lettuce, Leeks, Melons, Mustard, Peas-Snow or English, Southern Peas, Peppers, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Scallion, Sorrel, Spinach, Summer Squash, Winter Squash, Swiss Chard, Tomato and Watermelon. 
Herbs:
Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY  Herb!! Don't forget the  Wildflowers!
Arugula Beans, Beets, Cabbage, Carrots, Celery, Chard, Collards, Corn, Cucumber, Endive, Kohlrabi, Lettuce, Melons, Mustard, Pak Choy, Peas, Peppers, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Scallion, Sorrel, Spinach, Squash, Tomato, Turnip and Watermelon. 
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY Herb!!! Don't forget the  Wildflowers!
Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Bush Beans & Pole Beans, Lima Beans, Beets, Broccoli, Cabbage, Cantaloupe, Carrots, Collards, Sweet Corn, Cucumber, Eggplant, Lettuce, Melons, Mustard, Bunching Onion, Southern Peas, Peppers, Sweet Potatoes, Radish, Radicchio, Spinach, Summer Squash, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes and Watermelon.
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY  Herb!! Don't forget the Wildflowers!


INDOOR planting for cooler/cold areas.  If your area is warming up or already warmed up, it might be time to plant outside! 
*If you are starting seeds indoors or in a greenhouse,  
you can plant just about anything*
 
Sow Indoors/Outdoors:  Artichoke, Beets, Broccoli, Cabbage, Carrots, Cauliflower, Celery, Eggplant, Kohlrabi, Leek, Melons, Onions, Peppers, Radish, Rutabaga, Scallion, Tomatoes and Turnips
GREENS: Arugula, Chard, Collards, Endive, Kale, Mustard, Radicchio and Sorrel can be sown indoors under bright lights and planted outside when there are two true leaves. Curly cress and arugula prefer to be sown directly outside
Herbs: Basil, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Fennel, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Peppermint, Rosemary, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache plant and Thyme. 
Don't forget the Wildflowers!
Sow Indoors: Eggplant, Peppers and Tomatoes
Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Beans, Beets, Cabbage, Carrots, Cauliflower, Celery, Chard, Collards, Corn, Cucumber, Endive, Kale, Kohlrabi, Lettuce, Melons, Mustard, Pak Choy, Peas, Peppers, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Scallion, Sorrel, Spinach, Squash, Tomato, Turnip and Watermelon. 
Transplant: Asparagus, Broccoli, Celery, Eggplant, Kohlrabi, Leek, Peppers and Tomatoes
Herbs: Basil, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Fennel, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Peppermint, Rosemary, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache plant and Thyme. 
Don't forget the Wildflowers!
Sow Indoors: Cabbage, Celery, Chard, Eggplant, Endive, Leek, Lettuce, Peppers, Radicchio, and Tomato
Sow Outdoors: Artichoke, Arugula, Beets, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Chard, Carrot, Endive, Kale, Kohlrabi, Leeks, Lettuce, Mustard, Onion, Pak Choy, Peas, Radish, Rutabaga, Scallions, Sorrel, Spinach and Turnips
Transplant: Artichoke, Asparagus, Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Kale, Kohlrabi, Leeks, Lettuce, Onions, Scallion, Sorrel and Spinach
Herbs: Basil, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Fennel, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Peppermint, Rosemary, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache plant and Thyme. 
Don't forget the Wildflowers!
CONTINUE READING


Sow Outdoors: Arugula Beans, Beets, Cabbage, Carrots, cauliflower, Celery, Chard, Collards, Corn, Cucumber, Eggplant (transplant), Endive, Kale, Kohlrabi, Lettuce, Melons, Mustard, Pak Choy, Peas, Peppers, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Scallion, Sorrel, Spinach, Squash, Tomato, Turnip and Watermelon. 
Transplant: Asparagus, Broccoli, Celery, Eggplant, Kohlrabi, Leek, Peppers and Tomatoes
Herbs: Basil, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Fennel, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Peppermint, Rosemary, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache plant and Thyme. 
Don't forget the Wildflowers!
 
Sow Indoors: Cabbage, Celery, Chard, Eggplant, Endive, Leek, Lettuce, Peppers, Radicchio, and Tomato
Sow Outdoors: Artichoke, Arugula, Beets, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Chard, Carrot, Endive, Kale, Kohlrabi, Leeks, Lettuce, Mustard, Onion, Pak Choy, Peas, Radish, Rutabaga, Scallions, Sorrel, Spinach and Turnips
Transplant: Artichoke, Asparagus, Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Kale, Kohlrabi, Leeks, Lettuce, Onions, Scallion, Sorrel and Spinach
Herbs: Basil, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Fennel, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Peppermint, Rosemary, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache plant and Thyme. 
Don't forget the Wildflowers!
Sow Indoors: Cabbage, Celery, Chard, Eggplant, Endive, Leek, Lettuce, Peppers, Radicchio, and Tomato
Sow Indoors: Artichoke, Arugula, Beets, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Chard, Carrot, Endive, Kale, Kohlrabi, Leeks, Lettuce, Mustard, Onion, Pak Choy, Peas, Radish, Rutabaga, Scallions, Sorrel, Spinach and Turnips
Herbs: Basil, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Fennel, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Peppermint, Rosemary, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache plant and Thyme. 
Don't forget the Wildflowers!

 ARIZONA  
 

 NEW MEXICO   

FLORIDA has been split in 3 regions 
 

 
Arugula, Bush & Pole Beans, Lima Beans, Chinese Cabbage, Southern Peas, Potatoes, Sweet Potatoes and Radish
Bush & Pole Beans, Lima Beans, Chinese Cabbage, Sweet Corn, Okra, Southern Peas, Sweet Potatoes, Summer Squash, Winter Squash and Swiss Chard    
CONTINUE READING


 Bush & Pole Beans, Lima Beans, Cantaloupes, Sweet Corn, Cucumber, Okra, Southern Peas, Sweet Potatoes, Summer Squash, Winter Squash, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes and Watermelon
CONTINUE READING
Helpful Links to
Get you Started    
If you have additional questions please feel free to ask. 

 

Happy Planting,

 

Mary's Heirloom Seeds, P. O. Box 3763, Ramona, CA 92065

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Marys-Heirloom-Seeds/229833070442449

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Seed Sale EXTENDED & More Added! Posted on 28 Feb 23:04 , 0 comments

SEED SALE EXTENDED...AND MORE!

Mary's Heirloom Seeds
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Join Our List
 
February 28, 2017
We're on a roll here with planting season in full swing in warmer climates across the country!  Many of you have asked about growing different varieties from seed so we'll continue to share
Our 99 Cent Seed Sale has been extended ONE more day thru March 2nd.  Woohoo!
*Our email system with constant contact was down all morning so YOU get more time*
We've also added
  Coconut Coir Pellets and several
  Organic Soil Amendments to the Mix and those deals are good thru March 15th!

NEW Seeds Announcement
*Seed Sale* 
Take a look at these beautiful new varieties. 
They're only 99 cents a pack thru MARCH 2nd!

SUMMER BIBB LETTUCE

 
BANANA MELON 


 
COPENHAGEN MARKET CABBAGE 


 
OMAR'S LEBANESE TOMATO 


 
BENNING'S GREEN TINTED SCALLOP SQUASH 


 
SUGAR ANN SNAP PEA 

2 VARIETIES that aren't NEW but we've decided to offer on sale thru MARCH 2nd

 
CHIVES 

 
TIME TO PLANT HEIRLOOM SEEDS!
Now is a great time to stock up since all 
quantities of Coconut Coir Pellets are 
on SALE thru March 15th

 ORGANIC SOIL AMENDMENTS
ON SALE thru March 15th

HELPFUL LINKS 
If you have additional questions please feel free to ask. 
Happy Planting,
Mary's Heirloom Seeds, P. O. Box 3763, Ramona, CA 92065

Seed Starting with Coconut Coir Pellets Posted on 25 Feb 07:31 , 0 comments

We've shared about Using Coconut Coir in the Garden here in several articles but we've had quite a bit of questions.  Today we're going a bit more in-depth.
 
First, Why do we use Coconut Coir instead of Peat?

Coconut coir growing medium comes from the coconut's fibrous husk (known as coir) that is bound together by lignin (known as pith). After the husk is immersed in water for 6 weeks, the fiber is extracted mechanically, and the pith is left behind as a waste product and stored in heaps to age. Since the pith comes from the fruit, it is quite naturally rich in nutrients. Coconut coir growing mediums are dehydrated and compressed into a compact form for easy handling. With the addition of water, coir expands to an easy to work with growing medium.

Unlike peat moss, which is highly acidic, coconut coir has a neutral pH level. Most garden vegetables and flowers grow best in neutral to slightly alkaline conditions. When you use peat to amend a garden bed, an addition of agricultural lime is often necessary to combat the higher acidity. With coconut coir, limestone isn't necessary unless the soil naturally has a higher pH level. Coir use results in both a monetary and a labor savings, since you don't need to purchase further pH amendments nor work them into the soil.

-Coir improves soil drainage in the bed while also helping to retain moisture in quick-draining soils. Since coir breaks down slowly, much like peat, it creates air pockets in the soil that allow excess moisture to drain away from plant roots. The coir itself holds onto some moisture so the drainage doesn't occur too quickly and the soil doesn't dry out completely. These dual drainage and retention properties allow coir to improve moisture management in both heavy clay soils and dry, sandy beds.

-Peat moss, which coir replaces as a soil amendment, takes centuries to regrow once harvested. Coir is completely sustainable since it is a natural byproduct of coconut harvests, and coconut trees produce new coconuts every year. Using the coir in the garden keeps it out of the landfill where it would otherwise go. Coir can take a century or longer to fully break down in these landfills, so it's more sustainable to use it to improve your garden soil.

Step 1: Take out your Coconut Coir Pellets.  I like to use a large tray

Step 2: Add water to tray and Coconut Coir Pellets.  Using warm water might help them "grow" faster.
Step 3: Add seeds to the hole and gently cover or "squish" coconut coir.

Step 4: Place in a warm sunny place and keep moist.  This is where the real growing happens!

Common Seed-Starting Issues

GERMINATION

-Incorrect Temperature. Different seeds have different needs.

-Old Seeds. When properly stored seeds can have a very long shelf life. But the older they get, your germination rate will begin to reduce

-Incorrect Watering. Water in a necessity for all plants. In the germination stage you need to make sure you keep the soil evenly moist. If you water too much, you run the risk of your seeds rotting before they germinate. If you let them dry out, they will either never germinate or die trying!

-Planting Depth/Light. When you plant your seeds pay attention to your planting depth. This is important because if planted too deep you plants could run out of energy before reaching sunlight. Planting too shallow can lead to drying out. Some seeds actually need some light to germinate, so instead of digging them down you just press them into your soil.


MOLD or ROTTING

Dampening off, is probably the most common disease when starting seeds. It’s a fungus that can attack the seeds as soon as they germinate or after the seedling has emerged. You will know this is what killed your seedlings when you notice dark spots on the stem right at the soil level and the seedling topples over and withers away.

-Don't over water

-Provide air movement.  A small fan will work

-Nutrients: Use a half-strength, organic fertilizer with tiny seedling.  Our DIY Kelp Meal Tea is a great option for tiny seedling.  You can use this as a foliar feed as well.


OVERCROWDING

For coconut coir pellets, plant no more than 2 seeds per pellet for small seeds and only one per pellet for larger seeds.  If both seeds germinate, do not pull one out.  Pinch off one of the seedlings at the base to remove.  This will give the remaining seedling a chance to survive and thrive.
Once your seedlings are strong and roots start to grow out of the mesh, it's time to transplant them into the garden or into your containers.
Take the entire pellet and plant into the garden.  For healthier root growth and to give plants a boost, I add a tablespoon of Azomite into each hole and mix into the dirt before transplanting the coconut coir pellet with growing seedling. I also water with a diluted version of our DIY Kelp Meal Tea when I transplant to help with shock.
 
We hope you have enjoyed our in-depth article about Seed Starting with Coconut Coir.  If you have additional questions, feel free to comment below or send an email to mary@marysheirloomseeds.com

HAPPY PLANTING!

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NEW Seeds are 99 Cents A pack thru 1/14/17 Posted on 10 Jan 20:49 , 0 comments

99 Cent Seed pack Sale from Mary's Heirloom Seeds


Mary's Heirloom Seeds
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Join Our List
January 10, 2017
I know it sounds crazy to offer a sale during our super busy season but I'm just SUPER EXCITED to offer these new varieties

If you have additional question, please ask
99 Cent Heirloom Seed packs
**ADDED TODAY**  

These are all new (to us) heirloom seed varieties added today.
Each variety listed below is ON SALE thru Saturday, January 14th at midnight EST

 
 Flame lettuce has a mild flavor and will add real color to any salad bowl.

Nice bush form that will not take up tons of space like the standard Buttercup form.
These turban type fruits have dark green skin with some light green/creamish lines running longitudinally.
Sweet, orange, string-less flesh. Usually between 3-4 fruits at 3 - 5 lb each. 
Great storage squash and a New England favorite.

  

 Neon, hot pink chard is so pretty and is perfect picked small for salads or larger for braising.

 
Ebony Acorn is a delicious dark acorn type squash that is early and second only in flavor to Hubbard.  It is adapted for use all over the United States.
Prolific 8' vines produce 1.5-2lb fruits that have thick walls and a small seed cavity. 
The flesh is deep-orange, fine-textured, tender, dry and sweet. 
More productive and larger-fruited than table queen.  Does well in poor soil conditions.



40 days.   A deep merlot colored leaf resembling an oak leaf with deep lobes. 
Excellent for baby leaf production.  Unlike some other reds, oakleaf maintains a mild flavor throughout the lettuce season.  Resistance to common mildews.
An old favorite summer squash from the South of France.  24-30" tall and 18" spread.  The flesh of this round, green zucchini is very tender and fine flavored, making it an ideal squash for stuffing.


JUST A REMINDER....This sale starts 1/10/17 and ends January 14th @ midnight EST


 MORE from our Growing Tips & Videos page!!!

MORE GARDENING TIPS
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
NEW for 2017 @MARY'S HEIRLOOM SEEDS
 





As always, if you have additional questions please feel free to ask!

 
If you have additional questions please feel free to ask. 
Happy Planting,
Mary's Heirloom Seeds, P. O. Box 3763, Ramona, CA 92065
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Marys-Heirloom-Seeds/229833070442449