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How to Make Elderberry Syrup Posted on 11 Dec 18:30 , 2 comments

We make quite a few organic herbal remedies here including tinctures, salves and herbal syrups.  Today we made more Organic Elderberry Syrup using organic dry elderberry.  *One of the benefits of making syrup is that it's ready to consume in a few minutes to an hour compared to making tincture which can take 3 to 8 weeks to "brew."
ELDERBERRY


First, let's talk about Elderberry.  From Dr. Axe,

"Health benefits of the elder plant include naturally improving colds, the flu, sinus issues, nerve pain, inflammation, chronic fatigue, allergies, constipation and even cancer. (2) When used within the first 48 hours of onset of symptoms, the extract has actually been found to reduce the duration of the flu with symptoms being relieved on an average of four days earlier. (3) During the 1995 Panama flu epidemic, the government actually employed the use of the elderberry to fight the flu.

It gets better. When it comes antioxidant power, elderberry is higher in flavonoids than blueberries, cranberries, goji berries and blackberries. (4) I’m sure you’re getting the picture that this medicinal berry is a real powerhouse for good health. Let’s examine exactly why."

Dr. Axe lists the many benefits of Elderberry including

1. Major Cold and Flu relief

2. Sinus Infection Aid

3. Lower Blood Sugar

4.Natural Diuretic

5. Natural Laxative

6. Encourage Healthy Skin

7. Ease Allergies

8. May Prevent Cancer


Elderberry syrup can be used to flavor other homemade concoctions, as an herbal tonic or even drizzled over toast or yogurt. 


Make Your Own Organic Elderberry Syrup for Flu Prevention

Ingredients:

2/3 cup organic dry black elderberry (about 3 ounces)

3 1/2 cups filtered water

1-3 tablespoons fresh or dried organic ginger
1 teaspoon organic cinnamon powder

1 teaspoon cloves or clove powder

**If you have whole cloves, use 2 cloves**

1 cup of raw honey


Instructions

Pour water into medium saucepan and add elderberries, ginger, cinnamon and cloves (do not add honey!)

Bring to a boil and then cover and reduce to a simmer for about 45 minutes to an hour until the liquid has reduced by almost half. At that point, remove from heat and let cool enough to be handled.  Mash the berries carefully using a spoon or other flat utensil. Pour through a strainer into a glass jar or bowl.

Discard the elderberries (or compost them!) and let the liquid cool to lukewarm. When it is no longer hot, add 1 cup of honey and stir well.

When honey is well mixed into the elderberry mixture, pour the syrup into a pint sized mason jar or 16 ounce glass bottle of some kind.

That's it! You just made homemade elderberry syrup! Store in the fridge and take daily for its immune boosting properties. 

Standard dose is ½ tsp to 1 tsp for kids and ½ Tbsp to 1 Tbsp for adults. If the flu does strike, take the normal dose every 2-3 hours instead of once a day until symptoms disappear.

I hope you have enjoyed another educational article from Mary's Heirloom Seeds!



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ABOUT CALENDULA Posted on 30 Jul 07:54 , 1 comment

After sharing our DIY Calendula-Infused Oil we received so mach positive feedback and questions about Calendula.  Mainly "What is it used for?"  I use our homemade Calendula Oil for any sore spots, scratches and bruises, cracked heals and definitely for my "homesteader hands" after a long day in the garden.

I have another batch I've made and added Lavender essential oil to the mix *after* I have removed from heat and before I pour into glass jars.  It's amazing!!!


ABOUT CALENDULA From Herb Wisdom, "Calendula has been considered beneficial in reducing inflammation and promoting wound healing. It has been used to treat a variety of skin diseases and has been seen effective in treatment of skin ulcerations, eczema, juvenile acne and dry phthiriasis. Improvement has been seen in as little as 3-4 days of treatment according to the Universitatea de Medicina si Farmacie." "Calendula cream is good for acne and nappy rash. An infusion is good for digestion and relieves colitis and symptoms of menopause. As an anti-fungal agent, it can be used to treat athlete's foot, ringworm, and candida. The tincture applied neat to cold sores encourages healing.
 
Calendula contains chemicals, which have been shown in animal studies to speed up wound-healing by several actions that include increasing blood flow to the affected area and promoting the production of collagen proteins. Calendula also possesses anti-septic and anti-inflammatory effects due to its flavonoid content. In mouthwashes and gargles, calendula soothes sore throat or mouth tissue; in solutions, it has been uses to treat hemorrhoids.
Compresses of calendula blossoms are helpful for varicose veins. Results from recent animal and laboratory studies show that calendula may also have some anti-infective properties, particularly against fungal infections and against viruses."


It's AMAZING the natural healing properties available in some of the plants we grow.  Calendula is a beautiful flower I grow in my garden every year.  The bees love it and now we know it is beneficial for healing! 


At Mary's Heirloom Seeds we offer 3 different options to get your Calendula adventure started!

Calendula Seeds
Organic dried Calendula Flowers
DIY Organic Calendula Infusion Kit

If you have additional questions, we are happy to help.  We hope you have enjoyed another informative article from Mary's Heirloom Seeds!


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DIY Calendula Infused Oil Posted on 27 Jul 21:49 , 1 comment

Last year I started making my oil Calendula Infused Oil.  At first i was a bit frustrated because I didn't see many specific instructions.  You know, with real measurements.  So I've created my own recipe that works for me.  It's really easy to "tweak" this for your personal liking.
  I use Organic candelila wax (or carnauba wax) in my recipe.  This is a vegan wax.  That being said, the wax is completely optional.  Without the wax, the oil is not very firm but it's still amazing on your skin.

Calendula Infused Oil

Ingredients:
1 ounce Organic Calendula flowers (dry)
1 1/3 - 2 cups organic coconut oil
1/3 cup organic olive oil
1 tablespoon candelila wax or carnauba wax
dry Calendula flower

 


**The wax is completely optional**  If you want a firm salve, use bees wax or canauba wax.  I use Candelila wax or carnauba on occasion.  If you are just trying to make a smooth oil, feel free to omit the wax.


1 ounce of dried organic Calendula flowers is approximately 1 1/3 cups. 

If you want to GROW your own Calendula, we offer Calendula seeds.  If you want to make this recipe NOW and not wait for harvest, we offer organic, dry Calendula flowers 
We also just added organic carnauba wax to help you get started!

TOOLS:
slow cooker
large glass jar (quart-size ball jar)
fine mesh strainer or coffee filter
**strainer is much easier**

Directions
Add organic calendula, coconut oil and olive oil to your slow cooker.  Cover and set on low for 6-8 hours.
*If you do not have a slow cooker, you can add the ingredients into a large glass jar.  Place the jar in the oven on a very low setting for 6-8 hours*

Waiting and stirring while the oil is infused

After 6-8 hours, strain out the oil from the flowers.  Add the oil back to the slow cooker and stir in the candelila or carnauba wax.  Stir occasionally and let mix for approx 20 minutes or until completely dissolved.

Pour infused oil into a clean, glass container.  I used several half-pint jars for future use.  Label each jar with ingredients and date.


Calendula-Infused Oil

Store in a cool, dry place and out of direct sunlight.  Use on sore muscles.  Great for "homesteader hands" after working out in the garden!

Are you interested in purchasing a DIY kit?  We thought it would make it simpler if we offered a DIY Calendula Oil Kit.  All you need to add is the carrier oil!

Each kit includes:
1 or 2 ounces Organic Calendula flower
1 Glass Jar (quart size) with lid
1 ounce organic carnauba wax
and detailed instructions

DIY and SAVE with Mary's Heirloom Seeds

 

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5 Herbs to Boost Metabolism Posted on 21 Jul 20:39 , 4 comments

First let me start by saying that there is no quick fix or perfect concoction that works for everyone to boost Metabolism.  There is no magical "cure."  What I have learned along my journey is that incorporating different herbs, herbal remedies and making simple changes can have a positive effect on your health.

For people with underlying health issues, it is best to ask your doctor or health practitioner before starting any new herbal supplementation. 


1. HAWTHORN
In a study about Hawthorn, researcher found "There was a significant change on the weight loss, BMI change, blood pressure decrease, glucose, cholesterol, trigliseride, LDL, HDL and cholesterol/HDL after consumption of Hawthorn vinegar"

The antioxidants in hawthorn are thought to boost heart health by strengthening blood vessels and stimulating blood flow. Keep in mind that scientific support for the potential benefits of hawthorn is limited. 

Hawthorn is also used for digestive complaints.  It is also used to reduce anxiety, as a mild sedative and for menstrual problems.  

2. GINGER
Ginger is well recognized for its thermogenic qualities, meaning that it tends to slightly increase body temperature as it's being digested.

From progressive health "Ginger can improve digestion by increasing the pH of the stomach and stimulating the digestive enzymes. Because ginger also has a high fiber content, it increases gastrointestinal motility.
The combination of these two effects means that essential nutrients are absorbed quickly while the non-essential foods that cause bloating and constipation are excreted quickly."
Organic Ginger Root Powder


From our previous article Boost Your Health with Organic Herbs, "Ginger (Zingiber officinale) has scientific backing as an anti-nausea agent. It may offer other benefits to those stricken with infections diarrhea. Alcohol extracts of ginger are active against bacteria that infect the intestinal tract (Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli, Vibrio cholerae Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Helicobacter pylori), skin and other soft tissues (Staphylococcus aureus), and respiratory tract (Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae). Ginger has antifungal activity against the yeast Candida albicans. It also discourages intestinal worms. Because studies have shown that heat deactivates the antibacterial effect, it may be best to consume ginger raw, or in tincture or capsule form."

 
3. CINNAMON
A 2012 review of several recent studies concluded that the use of cinnamon had a potentially beneficial effect on glycemic control. One study published in 2009 found that a 500 mg capsule of cinnamon taken twice a day for 90 days improved hemoglobin A1C levels — a reflection of average blood sugar level for the past two to three months — in people with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes (hemoglobin A1C levels greater than 7 percent).

For those of you looking to boost your metabolism to lose weight, cinnamon might help!

Bonus, Cinnamon contains large amounts of highly potent polyphenol antioxidants. Cinnamon has been shown to lead to various improvements for Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease in animal studies. 
Cinnamaldehyde, the main active component of cinnamon, may help fight various kinds of infection.
Cinnamon oil has been shown to effectively treat respiratory tract infections caused by fungi.
It can also inhibit the growth of certain bacteria, including Listeria and Salmonella.

***Not all cinnamon is created equal.*** The Cassia variety contains significant amounts of a compound called coumarin, which is believed to be harmful in large doses. Ceylon (“true” cinnamon) is much better in this regard, and studies show that it is much lower in coumarin than the Cassia variety.
 

4.CAYENNE
 Capsaicin is the compound in cayenne peppers that gives it heat and boosts your metabolism. Capsaicin is found in the membranes of the cayenne inside the pepper. Capsaicin can also help aid in digestion, stimulate kidney function and help ease pain.

When you eat spicy foods such as cayenne pepper, your body's heat production rises, which can cause a slight increase in your metabolic rate, notes the University of Maryland Medical Center
Organic Cayenne Powder
From our previous article Boost Your Health with Organic Herbs, "Cayenne pepper's bright red color signals its high content of beta-carotene or pro-vitamin A. Just two teaspoons of cayenne pepper provide 47% of the daily value for vitamin A. Often called the anti-infection vitamin, vitamin A is essential for healthy epithelial tissues including the mucous membranes that line the nasal passages, lungs, intestinal tract and urinary tract and serve as the body's first line of defense against invading pathogens."


5. TURMERIC
Turmeric has been reported to increase metabolism by increasing bile production within the body, as well as lowering blood sugar levels.  More than 13 other peer-reviewed studies have also reached similar conclusions, finding that turmeric intake is directly associated with increased healthy fat loss and decreased insulin issues. 

Turmeric has been used in both Chinese and Indian medicine for thousands of years. Western researchers are finding that turmeric may be useful in lowering inflammation, fighting infections and specific cancers, treating liver disease, healing skin wounds and beneficial in treating digestive issues.


Disclaimer: Information on this website is based on research from the internet, books, articles and studies. Statements in this website should not be considered as medical advice. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any illness or disease. For diagnosis or treatment consult your physician. These statements have not been evaluated by the food and drug administration (FDA). 



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DIY Thai Basil Tincture Recipe Posted on 19 Aug 08:06 , 0 comments

Making your own herbal home remedies is easy.  Herbal tea is a great start but Tinctures can a much stronger alternative.  The cost to purchase 2 ounces in the store is almost 4 times what it would cost to make your own.  Some are even 7 times more expensive!  Source

You might enjoy reading Boost Your Health with Organic Herbs

From Getting Started with Herbal Remedies

What is a Tincture?
An herbal tincture is simply an herbal extract.  Herbal remedies have been used throughout history to treat illnesses and ailments without "modern medicine" and pharmaceuticals.  Tinctures are easy to make, home remedies.  If properly prepared and stored, your tincture will last indefinitely.


What are the benefits of Thai Holy Basil?
Basil, especially as an extract or oil, is known to have exceptionally powerful antioxidant properties that can protect the body from premature aging, common skin issues, age-related problems and even some types of cancer. The herb also contains the flavonoids, orientin and vicenin, which are plant pigments that shield your cell structures from oxygen and radiation damage.

Both fresh basil and basil oil have strong antibacterial capabilities. In fact, basil has been shown to stop the growth of many bacteria, even some that had grown resistant to other antibiotics. Basil can be applied to wounds to help prevent bacterial infections.

In Ayurvedic medicine, Holy Basil is used as a tea or a tincture. Among its many medicinal uses are lowering cholesterol, as an immune booster, and lowering blood glucose levels.  Source

 
To get started you'll need:  A clean jar with a lid, vodka or everclear, herb(s), measuring cups and/or scale and labels.  
If you purchase a DIY Tincture Kit from Mary's Heirloom Seeds, the herbs, jar with a lid. labels and dropper bottle are all included.  All you need to do is measure out your menstruum and combine!

Let's get started making our Tincture!

DIY Organic Thai Holy Basil Tincture
Ingredients and tools:
1 clean jar with a lid (quart size)
5-6 cups of vodka or everclear
1 ounce of organic Thai Holy Basil

Directions:
1.  Start with a cleaned and sterilized glass jar. Place organic Thai Holy Basil in your jar.
2.  Measure out 3-4 cups of vodka or other menstruum and place inside your jar.
*If you choose to use ACV or Vegetable Glycerin, be aware that your Tincture will have a limited shelf life of approx 6 months*
3. Place the lid back on your jar and mix thoroughly.
4. Label your homemade Tincture with the Date and Ingredients.
5. Store in a cool dry place such as a kitchen cabinet
*Shake your brewing tincture regularly.  I prefer to shake my tinctures 2-3 times per week.*

**Always label your jars and dropper bottles with ingredients and dates**

Start straining and consuming Basil Tincture after 4-6 weeks.
I take approx 1/2 teaspoon up to 3 times daily for approx 3 weeks.

Disclaimer: All information is intended for your general knowledge only and is not a substitute for medical advice or treatment for specific medical conditions. We cannot and do not give you medical advice. You should seek prompt medical care for any specific health issues and consult your physician before consuming any product(s).  

Just a few of my Homemade Tinctures!
We've added NEW Organic dried herbs for purchase @ 
Mary's Heirloom Seeds. Our DIY Tincture Kits are a great place to start!
 

 

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About Indian Strawberry Posted on 19 Aug 07:23 , 0 comments

There's been quite a buzzzzz over our latest additions here at Mary's Heirloom Seeds. 

Last week we added Dill Bouquet, Wild Strawberry and Indian Strawberry.

 

Indian Strawberry is considered a "mock strawberry" because it isn't actually a strawberry.

From Eat The Weeds,  "On first glance the P. indica looks like you have found yourself a brilliantly red, juicy strawberry. And that is probably the public relations problem P. indica has. It’s not what people expect so a lot of commentators dismiss it as worthless, but that’s a bit unfair. The fruit is 3.4% sugar, 1.5% protein and 1.6% ash. It has 6.3 mg of Vitamin C per 100 ml of juice.  An eight-foot patch will produce about 5.5 ounces fruit annually, about the same as wild strawberries, and you can cook the leaves as a green. Some folks think the fruit has a hint of watermelon flavor. Others say it is sour so there may be some genetic diversity there, either in the plant or our taste buds. There is certainly no harm adding some of the plant to your wilderness stew."

 

From Bellarmine University, "The entire plant is medicinal as an anticoagulant, antiseptic, depurative (purifier) and febrifuge (fever reducer). The herb can be used for stomatitis (an inflammation of the mucus lining), laryngitis, and acute tonsillitis. The fresh leaves can be crushed and applied externally as a medicinal poultice, a soft and moist mass. It is used in the treatment of boils and absesses, burns, weeping eczema, ringworm, snake and insect bites and traumatic injuries. A decoction of the leaves is medicinal and used in the treatment of swellings. An infusion, or liquid extract, of the flowers is used to activate the blood circulation. The Indian Strawberry can also cure skin diseases. In folklore it is said that in India it is to be used as an offering to the gods. The Wild Indian Strawberry is used extensively in China as a medicinal herb, and is being studied for its ability to stop the HIV virus and some forms of cancer from spreading through the body. "

So how do we grow Indian Strawberry?

Start Strawberry seeds for this rare ground cover plant that will get lots of attention! It is an Indian Strawberry plant with lovely yellow blooms, and it produces small red Strawberries all summer long on a creeping evergreen carpet. Indian Strawberry is well-suited for hanging over a wall or as a ground cover plant. Indian Strawberry ground cover is naturalized throughout the United States, and it is found growing in shady places in woods and grassy slopes. Indian Strawberry prefers a moist, but well-drained soil in a partially sunny position. Once Indian Strawberry plants are established, the matted root sends out runners to set new plants. Indian Strawberry leaves are light green and finely haired. Indian Strawberry flowers are small, yellow, and are 5 petaled. They first appear in April and will bloom throughout the summer until fall. The fruit is small, about 1/2 inch round. It is edible, but many say the taste is not noteworthy. Birds, however, love the red fruit. Another common name for this variety is Mock Strawberry ground cover.

For most of the US:  Sow the Strawberry seeds from January to April indoors. Use quality seed starter mix, and small pots or starter trays. Sow the Wild Strawberry ground cover seeds on the surface and press the seed into the mix. Keep the soil damp but not wet, and seal the starter tray or pots inside a plastic bag until after germination. When the Strawberry seedlings are large enough to handle, transplant them into 3 inch pots, and grow them on in cooler conditions until large enough to plant outdoors. After all danger of frost has passed, harden the young Wild Strawberry plants over a period of 7 - 10 days before planting outdoors in their permanent location.

For Florida growers: Plant strawberries  during the fall months--late September through October. Flower and berry growth begins in November; the harvest generally takes place in the months of April and May. 

 


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DIY Feverfew Tincture Tutorial Posted on 10 Aug 16:48 , 0 comments

Making your own herbal home remedies is easy.  Herbal tea is a great start but Tinctures can be a much stronger alternative.  The cost to purchase 2 ounces in the store is almost 4 times what it would cost to make your own.  Some are even 7 times more expensive!  Source

You might enjoy reading Fight Viruses with Organic Herbs & Food 

From Getting Started with Herbal Remedies

What is a Tincture?
An herbal tincture is simply an herbal extract. Herbal remedies have been used throughout history to treat illnesses and ailments without "modern medicine" and pharmaceuticals. Tinctures are easy to make, home remedies. If properly prepared and stored, your tincture will last indefinitely.



What are the benefits of Feverfew?
The word "feverfew" derives from the Latin word febrifugia, meaning "fever reducer."
Feverfew is used most often today to treat migraine headaches.
Feverfew has also be used for Asthma, Arthritis, Psoriasis, digestion and Menstrual cramps.

Feverfew is believed to aid digestion and lower blood pressure.  Long history of using leaves for fevers, menstrual cramps, and migraine headaches. Source
 


From Mary's Heirloom Seeds 
Compact, spreading growth up to 3-feet tall with small yellow centered white daisylike flowers.

To get started you'll need:  A clean jar with a lid, vodka or everclear, herb(s), measuring cups and/or scale and labels.  
If you purchase a DIY Tincture Kit from Mary's Heirloom Seeds, the herbs, jar with a lid, labels and dropper bottle are all included.  All you need to do is measure out your menstruum and combine! 

Let's get started making our Tincture!

DIY Organic Feverfew Tincture
Ingredients and tools:
1 clean jar with a lid (quart size)
3-5 cups of organic vodka or everclear
1 ounce of organic, dried Feverfew

Directions:
1.  Start with a cleaned and sterilized glass jar. Place organic Feverfew in your jar.
2.  Measure out 3-4 cups of vodka or other menstruum and place inside your jar.
*If you choose to use ACV or Vegetable Glycerin, be aware that your Tincture will have a limited shelf life of approx 6 months*
3. Place the lid back on your jar and mix thoroughly.
4. Label your homemade Tincture with the Date and Ingredients.
4. Store in a cool dry place such as a kitchen cabinet
*Shake your brewing tincture regularly.  I prefer to shake my tinctures 2-3 times per week.*

Start straining and consuming Feverfew Tincture after 4-6 weeks.
I take 1/2-1 teaspoon of tincture in water as needed.  


Disclaimer: All information is intended for your general knowledge only and is not a substitute for medical advice or treatment for specific medical conditions. We cannot and do not give you medical advice. You should seek prompt medical care for any specific health issues and consult your physician before consuming any product(s).  
Just a few of my Homemade Tinctures!
We've added NEW Organic dried herbs for purchase @ 

Stay tuned for more DIY Tincture Tutorials

 

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DIY "Allergy" Tincture Recipe Posted on 10 Aug 16:15 , 0 comments

Another recipe for alternative "medicine."

For my allergy tincture I use a special blend from Mary's Heirloom Seeds DIY Tincture Kit.   It is an herbal combination which can be used as a tea, infusion or tincture.  Our DIY Allergy Kit include: organic Nettle leaf, organic Fennel seed, organic Lemongrass, organic Spearmint leaf, organic Eyebright, organic Calendula flowers, organic Peppermint leaf, organic Red Clover herb and blossoms, organic Lavender flowers, organic Blue Vervain, and organic Stevia leaf.

"Allergy" Mixed herbs

I won't get into the specific properties of each herb but I can tell you that, used as tea, it is wonderfully minty and works well for seasonal allergy relief.  

 

Making your own herbal home remedies is easy. Herbal tea is a great start but Tinctures can a much stronger alternative. The cost to purchase 2 ounces in the store is almost 4 times what it would cost to make your own. Some are even 7 times more expensive! Source

You might enjoy reading Boost Your Health with Organic Herbs

From Getting Started with Herbal Remedies

What is a Tincture?
An herbal tincture is simply an herbal extract. Herbal remedies have been used throughout history to treat illnesses and ailments without "modern medicine" and pharmaceuticals. Tinctures are easy to make, home remedies. If properly prepared and stored, your tincture will last indefinitely.



Homemade Allergy Tincture
Tincture at 2 weeks
Ingredients:
1 ounce Allergy herbal mix (dry herbs)
3 cups organic vodka (or vegetable glycerin)
For a stronger tincture use less alcohol
*DO NOT use rubbing alcohol*

Directions:
1. Start with a cleaned and sterilized glass jar. Place organic Ginger in your jar.
2. Measure out 3 cups of vodka or other menstruum and place inside your jar.
*If you choose to use ACV or Vegetable Glycerin, be aware that your Tincture will have a limited shelf life of approx 6 months*
3. Place the lid back on your jar and mix thoroughly.
4. Label your homemade Tincture with the Date and Ingredients.

5. Store in a cool, dry place such as a kitchen cabinet. Keep Tinctures our of direct light
*Shake your brewing tincture regularly. I prefer to shake my tinctures 2-3 times per week, sometimes daily.*

Tincture is ready in 4-6 weeks, strain out herbs and place in a darker jar or leave in a dark place (cabinet). 
Dosage for Adults: 1 - 2 ml, two times daily
Disclaimer: All information is intended for your general knowledge only and is not a substitute for medical advice or treatment for specific medical conditions. We cannot and do not give you medical advice. You should seek prompt medical care for any specific health issues and consult your physician before consuming any product(s).

I just added a new combo pack...
"Flower Power" Herb Combo Pack - Check it out!!!



 

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DIY Organic Ginger Tincture Posted on 10 Aug 06:35 , 0 comments

Making your own herbal home remedies is easy. Herbal tea is a great start but Tinctures can a much stronger alternative. The cost to purchase 2 ounces in the store is almost 4 times what it would cost to make your own. Some are even 7 times more expensive! Source

You might enjoy reading Boost Your Health with Organic Herbs

From Getting Started with Herbal Remedies

What is a Tincture?
An herbal tincture is simply an herbal extract. Herbal remedies have been used throughout history to treat illnesses and ailments without "modern medicine" and pharmaceuticals. Tinctures are easy to make, home remedies. If properly prepared and stored, your tincture will last indefinitely.


What are the benefits of GINGER?
Ginger (Zingiber officinale) has scientific backing as an anti-nausea agent. It may offer other benefits to those stricken with infections diarrhea. Alcohol extracts of ginger are active against bacteria that infect the intestinal tract (Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli, Vibrio cholerae Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Helicobacter pylori), skin and other soft tissues (Staphylococcus aureus), and respiratory tract (Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae). Ginger has antifungal activity against the yeast Candida albicans. It also discourages intestinal worms. Because studies have shown that heat deactivates the antibacterial effect, it may be best to consume ginger raw, or in tincture or capsule form. Source


To get started you'll need: A clean jar with a lid, Menstruum: ACV, vegetable glycerin, vodka or everclear, herb(s), measuring cups and/or scale and labels.
If you purchase a DIY Tincture Kit from Mary's Heirloom Seeds, the herbs, jar with a lid. labels and dropper bottle are all included. All you need to do is measure out your menstruum and combine!

Let's get started making our Tincture!

DIY Organic Ginger Tincture
Ingredients and tools:
1 clean jar with a lid (quart size)
 3 cups of liquid (ACV, Vegetable glycerin, vodka or everclear)
1 ounce of organic Ginger Root (dried)

**Always label your jars and dropper bottles with ingredients and dates**

Directions:
1. Start with a cleaned and sterilized glass jar. Place organic Ginger in your jar.
2. Measure out 3 cups of vodka or other menstruum and place inside your jar.
*If you choose to use ACV or Vegetable Glycerin, be aware that your Tincture will have a limited shelf life of approx 6 months*
3. Place the lid back on your jar and mix thoroughly.
4. Label your homemade Tincture with the Date and Ingredients.

5. Store in a cool, dry place such as a kitchen cabinet. Keep Tinctures our of direct light
*Shake your brewing tincture regularly. I prefer to shake my tinctures 2-3 times per week, sometimes daily.*

Start straining and consuming Ginger Tincture after 4-6 weeks. I prefer to store strained tinctures in amber dropper bottles.
I take approx 1/2 teaspoon up to 3 times daily as needed.

Disclaimer: All information is intended for your general knowledge only and is not a substitute for medical advice or treatment for specific medical conditions. We cannot and do not give you medical advice. You should seek prompt medical care for any specific health issues and consult your physician before consuming any product(s).
Just a few of my Homemade Tinctures!
We've added NEW Organic dried herbs for purchase @

Stay tuned for more DIY Tincture Tutorials.

 

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Make Your Own Herbal Remedies and Save Posted on 05 Aug 10:00 , 0 comments

It's another beautiful day here.  The air is cool and crisp.  The sun is shining and life is good! 
Today I'm talking Tinctures!  

In our house, we use tinctures first for every-day ailments.  We have had such great success using herbal home remedies instead of OTC "stuff" so let's chat!

What is a Tincture?
From our recent article Getting Started with Herbal Remedies
There are many ways to use herbs for medicinal purposes and one is in a tincture. Other uses include consuming in food, salves, herbal vinegar and herbal oils, teas and even syrup. I thought I would start with Tinctures because it is quite simple and easy to use.
An herbal tincture is simply an herbal extract. Herbal remedies have been used throughout history to treat illnesses and ailments without "modern medicine" and pharmacueticals. Tinctures are easy to make, home remedies. If properly prepared and stored, your tincture will last indefinitely.


Why DIY Tinctures?

Now for the bottom line...saving money!  If you look at your local "health food store" you will find tinctures.  Most are $10-$40 per ounce.  Online it is the same story plus shipping.  Pictured is a special "kit" I put together to get started on your tincture.

Our DIY Tincture Kits include 

1-32 ounce glass jar with lid, 1- 2 ounce Amber bottle with dropper top, 2 customizeable labels, 1 ounce of Organic Herb of your choice (additional herbs available) and Details Instructions

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Earlier this month I purchased a large bottle of 100 proof vodka for $17.  That's approx 59 ounces. 

1-2 ounces of herbs and16-32 ounces of vodka and I still have more vodka left.


Let's do the math
Tincture Kit (1 oz of herb) from Mary's Shop $15.75
Priority mail shipping $6.25

24 ounces (3 cups) of 100 proof vodka (approx)  $6.91


Total spent for 24 ounces of Tincture  $28.91
Homemade: Total spent for 2 ounces $2.41


Online store selling 1 ounce of Chamomile Tincture  $11.00
Shipping $4
Store-Bought: Total for 2 ounces: $26

HUGE savings!!!  Plus, with the Tincture Kit you have the Jar, Strainer top and detailed Instructions to make more! Kits ship within 48 hours (except weekends and holidays) via Priority Mail.

Not sure about the alcohol contentThe alcohol in a tincture can be evaporated out by adding the drops to almost boiling water and swirling until cool. Although a vegetable glycerin or Apple Cider Vinegar based tincture has a short shelf life, it can be used instead of alcohol for those who prefer an alternative.

Make your own Tincture using Mary's Organic DIY Tincture Kits.

So far, we have shared tutorials for Echinacea Tincture and Getting Started.  Every Tincture Kit purchased thru Mary's Heirloom Seeds includes detailed instructions.  Tinctures are simple to make and as we've shown above, much less expensive compared to store-bought.

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