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Plant Spacing Chart for Veggies Posted on 23 Feb 08:49 , 0 comments

So many different kinds of vegetables need different spacing and it can be difficult to remember how much space goes between each plant. In order to make growing a garden easier, we have put together a plant spacing chart to help you.

 

Please keep in mind that this is not plant spacing for square foot gardening.  Square foot gardening allows you to plant much closer.  We're working on another article specific for square foot gardening.  Stay tuned!

 

Plant Variety Spacing Between Plants Spacing Between Rows
Amaranth 7"-10" 10"-12"
Artichoke 18" 24"-36"
Asparagus 12"-18" 36"-48"
Bean-Bush 2"-4" 18"-24"
Bean-Pole 4"-6" 24"-36"
Beets 3"-4" 12"-18"
Broccoli
18″ – 24″
24"-36″
Brussels Sprouts 18"-24" 24"-36"
Cabbage 9"-12" 36"-40"
Chinese Cabbage 6"-12" 18"-30"
Carrots 1"-2" 12"-18"
Cauliflower 18"-24" 18"-24"
Corn 10"-14" 36"-40"
Cucumber 8"-10" 36"-48"
Eggplant 18"-24" 30"-36"
Greens-baby harvest 2"-4" 12"-18"
Greens-mature harvest 10"-18" 24"-36"

Kale

12"-18" 24"
Kohlrabi 6" 12"
Leeks 4"-6" 8"-16"
Lettuce-heading 12" 12'
Lettuce-loose leaf 3" 3"
Okra 12"-14" 24"-36"
Onion 4"-6" 4"-6"
Parsnips 8"-10" 18"-24"
Peas 4"-6" 18"-24"
Peppers 14"-18" 18"-24"
Pigeon Peas 4"-8" 36"-40"
Potatoes 8"-12" 30"-36"
Pumpkin 34"-72" 60"-120"
Radicchio 8"-10" 12"
Radish 1"-4" 2"-4"
Rhubarb 36"-48" 36"-48"
Rutabaga 6"-8" 12"-18"
Shallots 6"-8" 6"-8"
Spinach 2"-4" 12"-18"
Squash-summer 18"-24" 36"-48"
Squash-winter 24"-36" 48"-60"
Sweet Potato 12"-18" 36"-48"
Swiss Chard 6"-12" 12"-18"
Tomatillo 23"-36" 36"-48"
Tomatoes 24"-36" 48"-60"
Turnips 2"-4" 12"-18"
FRUIT
Garden Huckleberry 36" 36"
Melon 24"-36" 34"-42"
Watermelon 24"-60" 48"-60"

 

Proper plant spacing can help reduce plant disease and maintain healthy plant.

Using this chart, it's easy enough to interplant Companion Plants in your garden.  If you're wondering what to plant and when to plant in your area, check out our 2018 Planting Guide for the US.  We added a few new regions this year.

For additional planting info we have an entire page GROWING TIPS & VIDEOS to help you grow a healthy, successful garden


I hope you have enjoyed another educational article.  If you have additional questions, please leave a comment below or send an email to mary@marysheirloomseeds.com
 


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Kitchen Herb Garden Seed Giveaway Posted on 18 Feb 11:41 , 32 comments

We LOVE Giveaways!!!!
As promised,  Mary's Heirloom Seeds is sponsoring Another Giveaway.
Are you ready???

This is a super simple giveaway with loads of seeds!  This Giveaway will run from Sunday, February 18 thru Tuesday, February 20th at midnight and is open to residents of the US and Canada
We will pick One Lucky Winner on Wednesday, February 21st.

GIVEAWAY INCLUDES
This is a great starter kit for your Kitchen Herb Garden.  Includes a full-pack of the following varieties:
Genovese Basil
Cilantro
Dill
Oregano
Sage
Tarragon
Thyme

Coconut coir growing medium comes from the coconut's fibrous husk (known as coir) that is bound together by lignin (known as pith).  With the addition of water, coir expands to an easy to work with growing medium. The addition of water increases the volume 3 to 9 times, depending on the packaging of products. This process results in a 100% organic, biodegradable growing medium, making it a natural and safe growth medium of choice for growers


Mary's Heirloom Seeds is a "mom and pop" small business created out of a desire to help people become more sustainable and self-sufficient. Our customers know that we are a simple phone call or email away
We currently offer over 500 varieties of open-pollinated, non-gmo &a non-hybrid Heirloom Seeds.  Mary has signed the Safe Seed Pledge AND the Declaration of Seed Freedom.
 
Are you ready to enter the giveaway?


Giveaway is open to all Residents of the US and Canada.
Giveaway opens 2/18/2018 and ends Tuesday, February20th at Midnight.
All giveaway entrants will be added to Mary's Heirloom Seeds mailing list.
Your information is never sold and we never send spam emails.
a Rafflecopter giveaway

GIVE PEAS A CHANCE Posted on 02 Feb 05:51 , 0 comments

Mary's Heirloom Seeds Newsletter
Give PEAS A Chance


Seed Combo Packs
 
 
   
 Like us on Facebook  Follow us on Twitter 
OUR VIDEOS
SPRING is almost here and we can feel it!
have you enjoyed our planting tutorials so far?

As a bonus this weekend, we've added a few of our
Heirloom Pea seeds to our
99 Cent Seed Pack Collection

If you have additional questions we're happy to help!
 
Give PEAS A Chance!
 From our blog
Most PEAS are a cool weather crop.  Sweet Peas (garden peas), Snap Peas and Snow Peas are cool weather crops.  Southern Peas are heat tolerant and grow well in HOT climates. 
 
SUGAR ANN SNAP PEAS
PEAS, in my opinion, are one of the most under rated crops.  
-They are SO EASY to grow
-Seed saving is simple
-High Yield Crops in smaller spaces
-Some varieties are more pest resistant than others

 
 

Are you ready to grow PEAS?
 
From the Old Farmer's Almanac
PLANTING
  • To get the best head start, turn over your pea planting beds in the fall, add manure to the soil, and mulch well.
  • As with other legumes, pea roots will fix nitrogen in the soil, making it available for other plants.
  • Peas will appreciate a good sprinkling of wood ashes to the soil before planting.
  • Sow seeds outdoors 4 to 6 weeks before last spring frost, when soil temperatures reach 45 degrees F.
  • Plant 1 inch deep (deeper if soil is dry) and 2 inches apart.
  • Get them in the ground while the soil is still cool but do not have them sit too long in wet soil. It's a delicate balance of proper timing and weather conditions. For soil that stays wet longer, invest in raised beds.
  • A blanket of snow won't hurt emerging pea plants, but several days with temperatures in the teens could. Be prepared to plant again.
  • Peas are best grown in temperatures below 70 degrees F.
 
 

Wondering WHEN to plant peas in your area?   
See Mary's 2018 Planting Guide for your region-specific planting info

BIG RED RIPPER (MANDY) SOUTHERN PEA


Intercrop peas with fast-growing cool-season crops such as spinach or radishes. After final harvest, follow with late squash plantings or fall-harvested cool-season crops such as broccoli, leeks or potatoes. 
Sow fall crops about 8 to 10 weeks before first frost date. Fall crops can be disappointing if hot weather persists. Powdery-mildew-resistant varieties are best for fall crops.

Do not use high-nitrogen fertilizers. Too much nitrogen will result in lush foliage but poor flowering and fruiting. Inoculation with Mycorrhizae may be beneficial if peas have not been grown in the past.

Do not plant peas in the same place more than once in every 4 years. Avoid planting where in places where peas have suffered before from root rot. 

Peas:  Plant with Beans, carrot, corn, cucumber, radish, turnips, SAGE, spinach, mint and potatoes.  Avoid planting with Onions and Garlic.

 
 


HARVESTING PEAS 
From Mother Earth News 
To avoid mangling the vines, use two hands to harvest peas. When green peas are ripe, harvest them daily, preferably in the morning. Pick snow peas when the pods reach full size and the peas inside are just beginning to swell. For best flavor and yields, allow snap peas to change from flat to plump before picking them. Gather sweet green shell peas when the pods begin to show a waxy sheen, but before their color fades.  

Immediately refrigerate picked peas to stop the conversion of sugar to starches and maintain the peas' crisp texture. Promptly blanch and freeze your extra peas.
 
If you have additional questions please feel free to ask.  We are happy to help!
 
Sincerely,                                   
Mary
The doctor of the future will give no medicine, but will interest her or his patients in the care of the human frame, in a proper diet, and in the cause and prevention of disease.
Thomas A. Edison 

 "The garden suggests there might be a place where we can meet nature halfway."
Michael Pollan 

Mary's Heirloom Seeds, P. O. Box 3763, Ramona, CA 92065

 


Growing Pak Choy Cabbage from Seed to Harvest Posted on 11 Jan 16:39 , 0 comments

There are so many unique varieties of heirloom cabbage to grow in your garden.  Pak Choy is one of our favorite varieties of Chinese cabbage.

DWARF PAK CHOY CABBAGE

 

From our article Growing Cabbage from Seed to Harvest

"Chinese cabbage, often called Chinese leaves in supermarkets are the odd one out in the cabbage family. They look more like a cos lettuce than a cabbage for starters.

The cultivation method is completely different than conventional cabbage as well, they do not like root disturbance and usually would be sown in situ rather than being transplanted.

Cultivation of Chinese Cabbage

Like the other brassicas they like a rich soil with a high pH - neutral at least..

Sow about 3 or 4 seeds at 30cm spacing each way, usually in May although some fast growing varieties can go in as late as early August and thin to the strongest seedling. Harvest is from late September to min-November."  Allotment Vegetable Growing

 

Cabbage is best grown in a temperate climate, and should be planted in an open and sunny spot that can either be in full sun or partial shade.

Soil Conditions

Most types of cabbage require a well-draining, light - medium soil with a neutral pH of about 6.5 - 7.0.

When growing cabbage, the soil should be prepared well in advance, especially if you are enriching the soil with organic matter. If you are sowing the cabbage seeds in spring, prepare the soil in autumn by digging in plenty of well-rotted compost or manure.

 

Planting Seeds

Sow the seeds at 1/4 - ½ inch deep.  If you are direct sowing, leave 6 inches between rows. When seedlings reach a height 4 - 6 inches and have 5 or 6 true leaves, they will be ready to transplant.

It is best to water in the evening, the day before you are due to transplant, and then plant the seedlings 12-18 inches apart for spring cabbage. Allow approximately 1 foot between rows. Make sure that you firm down the soil around the plants.

Hoe around the plants to remove all weeds and apply a mulch to suppress weeds from appearing. Mulch will also retain moisture, which is extremely important during the hot weather. The cabbage plants must not be allowed to dry out, as it will affect their growth. 

PAK CHOY CABBAGE

 

Practice crop rotation with cabbage year to year to avoid a buildup of soil borne diseases.

Although cabbage, broccoli, and cauliflower are closely related, and require similar nutrients, it’s best not to plant them together. They are all heavy feeders, depleting the soil faster of required nutrients; plus, they will attract the same pests and diseases.

 

Companion Plants for Cabbage

Celery, dill, onions and potatoes are good companion plants. Celery improves growth and health. Clover interplanted with cabbage has been shown to reduce the native cabbage aphid and cabbageworm populations by interfering with the colonization of the pests and increasing the number of predatory ground beetles. Plant Chamomile with cabbage as it Improves growth and flavor. Cabbage does not get along with strawberries, tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, rue, grapes, lettuce and pole beans.

 

Organic Pest Control for Cabbage

DIY Organic Pest Control Recipes

Diatomaceous Earth is one option. No preparations necessary!   DE kills aphids, white flies, beetles, loopers, mites, snails, slugs, leaf hoppers, and harmful pests. Use DE inside your greenhouse or outdoors on fruits, vegetables, flowers, grains and grass. Apply Food Grade Diatomaceous Earth up to and including day of harvest. Check out Using Diatomaceous Earth for Non-Toxic, Natural Pest control 

 

Harvesting Cabbage is easy.  Simply lift the whole vegetable from the ground with a garden fork or spade, or cut the stem, just above the lowest leaves of the plant.


I hope you have enjoyed another educational article.  If you have additional questions, please leave a comment below or send an email to mary@marysheirloomseeds.com

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How to Grow Luffa from Seed Posted on 10 Jan 18:28 , 1 comment

You've probably heard of a luffa sponge and you might have even used them.  Did you know that a luffa sponge is actually a gourd?  Luffa is one of our favorite crops to grow.

 

What is a Luffa?

Luffa (Luffa aegyptiaca and Luffa acutangula), also known as loofah, vegetable sponge or dishcloth gourds, are grown mainly for their useful fibrous tissue skeleton. Young fruits can be eaten as squash, used in stews or even used in place of cucumbers.

Growing luffa is really fun but it definitely takes patience. Luffa is cold sensitive and takes a long time to mature into a dried sponge.  From seed, Luffa takes 120-200 days to fully mature.

 

Growing Luffa from Seed

Soak Luffa seeds for 24 hours before planting.

Sow luffa seeds 8 to 12 inches apart along a fence as soon as the ground is warm enough to work and all danger of frost has passed in spring.

In more northern areas of the country most gardeners start seeds in pots (at least 4", but 5" or 6" are even better, so roots can expand) inside a few weeks before planting time and then transplant them outdoors once the weather is warm and settled.

Luffa vines can grow to around 30 feet long and need a strong trellis to grow on so be prepared to give them a sturdy support such as a fence or trellis.

 

Taking Care of Luffa Plants

Increase your success at germination by starting your seeds in coconut coir.

When the weather is right (warm soil and air) start hardening off your seedlings.  This is more important than with most other plants because Luffa are so prone to transplant shock.

After a week or so of hardening off, plant your seedlings in an area that gets FULL sun.

Keep the Luffa watered.  During summer, I water daily.

Feed your luffa plants every 4 to 6 weeks with a diluted liquid fertilizer or compost tea.

 

 

Harvesting Luffa

The very first fruits that appear on the vine should be allowed to mature into sponges.

Luffa sponges are mature and ready to pick when the green skin has turned dark yellow or brown and starts to separate from the fiber inside, and the fruit feels lightweight. Leave fruit hanging on the vine as long as possible for maximum sponge fiber development, but be sure to pick and peel the fruit immediately if they get hit by frost.

First, peel off the tough outer skin: If it is already cracked you can pull it off in pieces, if it is intact try squashing the fruit gently until cracks appear and then extending the cracks by squeezing the fruit and pulling at the torn edges of the skin with your thumbs. If the skin is very dry, soaking the fruit in water for a few minutes may make it easier to dislodge the skin. 

Once the skin has been removed, shake out the seeds.  Next, wash the sap out of the sponge with a strong jet of water or in a bucket of water with a little dishwashing.

Finally, dry the washed sponges in the sun, turning them frequently, until completely dry. Store in a cloth bag to prevent them from getting dusty and they will keep for years.

 

I hope you have enjoyed another educational article.  If you have additional questions, please leave a comment below or send an email to mary@marysheirloomseeds.com


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HAPPY NEW YEAR with Over 40 New Arrivals! Posted on 31 Dec 17:49 , 0 comments

Mary's Heirloom Seeds
Quick Links
Join Our List
A few favorites
 
Helpful Articles     
December 31, 2017
"The garden suggests there might be a place where we can meet nature halfway."
-Michael Pollan
We're gearing up for the 2018 planting season!
Below is our HUGE compilation of New Arrivals for 2018 and we are so excited!

As an added bonus, We are giving away small garden notebooks with purchase of $30 or more
Between Dec 31st and Jan 2nd as a
special New Year's gift.


If you have additional question, please ask

Enjoy!


NEW ARRIVALS FOR 2018
 
If you have placed an order for
Organic Seed Potatoes....
We will begin shipping out to customers in Warmer climates such as Florida as early as January 1.

If you are interested in purchasing
Organic Seed Potatoes, please do not wait til planting time as we will be sold out by then.
  
 
NEW ARRIVALS
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 *NEW FOR 2018* 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
If you have additional questions please feel free to ask. 

 

Happy Planting,

 

Mary's Heirloom Seeds, P. O. Box 3763, Ramona, CA 92065

NEW ARRIVALS for 2018 - Part 2 Posted on 15 Dec 04:48 , 0 comments

Mary's Heirloom Seeds
Quick Links
Join Our List
December 15, 2017
As promised, Mary's Heirloom Seeds continues to add to our existing selection of Heirloom, 
Open-Pollinated seeds.
 
This week, we're adding more varieties!
 
Also, Pre-Orders of Organic Seed Potatoes 
are now available!!!
 
Harvest dates will vary based on variety of potato.  Generally, potatoes take 90-120 days to harvest.
  Under optimal conditions, you can expect to harvest 10-15 pounds of potatoes for every pound of seed potato planted. 

Find out when to plant potatoes
NEW ARRIVALS for 2018
PART 2  

105 days.  These unique, Very flat, pure white pumpkins that are unique and tasty. Very sweet orange flesh is perfect for pies and baking
 
 
70-80 days.  Determinate.   
Great for sauces, salsas and pastes
 
 
 75 days. Roots grow 7"-8" long and are great raw or cooked.
 
 
 75 days. Popular Japanese variety for home or market; deep orange, stubby roots are mild and sweet.
 
 
 85 days. One of the best orange-flesh watermelons. Very crisp, sweet, and flavorful deep orange flesh
 
 
 100 days. VERY RARE. Introduced to America about 1862 by James Hogg, of Yorkville, New York, from seeds his brother Thomas sent him from Japan.
 
 
 110 days.  An heirloom to the Buffalo, New York area, it was first distributed to select members of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society by Mr. Ives in the Spring of 1833 and quickly became available as a commercial variety shortly thereafter.
 
 
105 days.  These unique, Very flat, pure white pumpkins that are unique and tasty. Very sweet orange flesh is perfect for pies and baking. 


 YIPPIE! 
WE LOVE HEIRLOOM SEEDS!

  
NEW ARRIVALS for 2018
PART 1 
FRENCH GARDEN BEANS
50 days.  Tall, very upright bush.  Beans hang neatly and in clusters. Long thin podded French bush bean, selected for home garden cultivation.
 
 
 
CANARY YELLOW SWISS CHARD 
60 days. This Swiss chard produces a stunning canary yellow stem that deeply contrasts with its sea green leaves held above.  Produces large leaves and Very productive.  
 
 
65 days.  This unique heirloom Originated in Armenia.
Fruits are light green with darker green striped ribs which curl into "s" shaped fruits. 
 
JARRAHDALE PUMPKIN
110 days.  A New Zealand heirloom, Jarrahdale pumpkin has a slate blue, ribbed exterior and a deep delicious orange interior flesh. 
 
 
 
BIRDHOUSE BOTTLE GOURD 
95 days. This long-handled ball-shaped gourd can be hollowed out to make attractive birdhouses, a big dipper gourd, or musical instruments. 
 
 
 
ANCHO POBLANO PEPPER 
75 days. Also called Ancho Pepper in its dried form, the Poblano is a pepper of many wonderful uses including salsa, grilling, stir fries or stuffed for chile rellenos and substituted in any dish for bell pepper.
 
BULGARIAN CARROT PEPPER
75-80 days.  Bulgarian Carrot Pepper grows up to 18" tall and produces peppers that are about 3 1/2" long. 
70 days.   The Hungarian wax pepper is a canary yellow chile pepper also known as the hot yellow pepper or hot wax pepper. The Hungarian wax is closely related to the mild banana pepper.  
DILL, DUKAT
Aromatic, never bitter or overly pungent, try this one for the sweetest of all dills. With a delicate fragrance, Dukat stays in the leaf stage longer than other varieties
ROX ORANGE SUGAR CANE SORGHUM
Rox orange is an old time sorghum favorite for syrup.   Rox Orange sorghum is grown like corn, but prefers well drained sandy loam. Rox Orange will grow to 8 ft. tall and can be cut for silage after 70-80 days, or be used for livestock grain if left to full maturity.
THOMAS LAXTON PEA
65 days.  Any pea that was introduced over 100 years ago and is still widely grown should tell you volumes.  Reliable, consistent, and sweet are just some of the words used to describe this pea.
Organic Seed Potatoes   
We are currently offering PRE-ORDERS of
select varieties of
ORGANIC *Non-GMO* SEED POTATOES
Depending on your location AND date of purchase, seed potatoes will be available to ship as early as January 1.
*Price and availability subject to change*
    


Remember, even if planting time in your area isn't until March or April, NOW is the time to start thinking about Organic Seed Potatoes 

 
PURPLE MAJESTY 





 


Please purchase additional items in a separate order.    
Items ordered with Organic Seed Potatoes will ship together after January 1st.

As we ship on a first come, first serve basis, your order may not ship until days or weeks later. You will receive an email when your order ships.


Check out Mary's 2017 Planting Guide
for more planting guides and Growing Tips 
 
As always, if you have additional questions please feel free to ask!
This data has been compiled from our own research as well as feedback from our customers.
 
Helpful ARTICLES    
If you have additional questions please feel free to ask. 

 

Happy Planting,

 

Mary's Heirloom Seeds, P. O. Box 3763, Ramona, CA 92065

Mary's 2018 Planting Guide for the US Posted on 14 Dec 10:06 , 1 comment

Mary's Heirloom Seeds
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Join Our List
December 14, 2017
I know it's still 2017 but we have had so many request lately that we just had to share.

How is this different than our previous planting guides???

We've added a few new regions by request AND we've added quite a few articles from 2017

Now you can plan your 2018 garden from one convenient article link!

If there is a specific region that you'd like us to share, please reply to this email.  If you have additional question, please ask

MARY'S 2018
PLANTING GUIDE  

 
FLORIDA has been split into 3 sections for a more thorough planting guide
 

SOUTH FLORIDA

CENTRAL FLORIDA

NORTH FLORIDA


ADDITIONAL PLANTING GUIDES

When to Plant Organic Garlic

When to Plant Potatoes

As always, if you have additional questions please feel free to ask!
This data has been compiled from our own research as well as feedback from our customers.
 
RECENT ARTICLES &
GETTING STARTED    
If you have additional questions please feel free to ask. 

 

Happy Planting,

 

Mary's Heirloom Seeds, P. O. Box 3763, Ramona, CA 92065

 


Colorado Vegetable Seed Planting Guide Posted on 14 Dec 09:31 , 0 comments

As promised, we are expanding our vegetable seed planting guide and including Oregon.  This is one of many region-specific guides offered here at Mary's Heirloom Seeds.  Find a complete list on our Growing Tips & Videos page.
This planting guide is from the Old Farmer's Almanac & customer suggestions and is slightly different than our Central Midwest / North Central & Rockies Planting Guide

 

COLORADO PLANTING GUIDE 2018

***Seed Planting Guide***
Please note: Planting times may be altered depending on elevation, location, and the use of a cloche or row cover

FEBRUARY

Sow Indoors: Eggplant, Leek, Onion,

MARCH

Sow Indoor: Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Eggplant, Leeks, Lettuce, Onions, Peas, Peppers, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes and tomatillos

APRIL

Sow Indoor: Basil, Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Celery Eggplant, Leek, Lettuce, Okra, Onion, Peas, Peppers, Swiss Chard and Tomato

Sow Outdoors: Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Carrots, Cauliflower, Kale, leek, Lettuce, Onion, Parsnips, Peas, Radish, Spinach and Swiss Chard

SWISS CHARD

MAY

Sow Indoor: Basil, Beans, Celery, Corn, Cucumber, Melon, Okra, Pepper, Pumpkin (5/15), Summer Squash, Tomato and Watermelon

Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Basil (5/15), Beans (5/15), Beets, Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, Cabbage, Chinese Cabbage (pak choy), Carrots, Cauliflower, Celeriac, Celery, Chard, Cilantro, Collards, Corn (5/15), Cucumber (5/15), Dill (5/15), Eggplant (5/15), Fennel, Kale, Kohlrabi, Leek, Lettuce, Okra, Onion, Parsnips, Peas, Peppers, Radicchio, Radish, Rutabaga, Salad greens, Scallions, Spinach, Squash, summer (5/15) Squash (winter), TOMATOES (5/15), Turnips and Watermelon (5/15)

 

JUNE

Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Basil, Beans, Beets, Carrots, Celery, Chard, Cilantro, Corn, Cucumbers, Dill, Eggplant, Endive, Kale, Lettuce, Melons, Okra, Onion, Peas, Peppers, Pumpkins, Radish, Scallions, Spinach, Squash (summer & winter), Tomatoes and Watermelon

JULY

Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Basil, Beans, Beets, Cabbage (early), Carrots, Chard, Cilantro, Collards, Fennel, Lettuce, Radish, Spinach, Squash (summer) and Turnips

AUGUST

Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Broccoli raab, Cabbage, Chinese Cabbage (pak choy), Cauliflower, Chard, Cilantro, Collards, Kale, Lettuce, Mustard greens, Radish, Salad greens, Spinach and Turnips

SEPTEMBER

Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Chinese Cabbage (pak choy), Endive, Lettuce, Radish and Swiss Chard

HEIRLOOM TOMATOES

HELPFUL LINKS


I hope you have enjoyed another educational article.  If you have additional questions, please leave a comment below or send an email to mary@marysheirloomseeds.com

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Oregon Vegetable Seed Planting Guide Posted on 14 Dec 08:40 , 0 comments

As promised, we are expanding our vegetable seed planting guide and including Oregon.  This is one of many region-specific guides offered here at Mary's Heirloom Seeds.  Find a complete list on our Growing Tips & Videos page.

This planting guide is from the Old Farmer's Almanac & customer suggestions and is slightly different than our Pacific Northwest Planting Guide.

OREGON PLANTING GUIDE 2018

***Seed Planting Guide***

Please note: Planting times may be altered depending on elevation, location, and the use of a cloche or row cover


JANUARY

Sow Indoors: Artichoke, Onions and Spinach

 

FEBRUARY

Sow Indoors: Basil, Cilantro, Arugula, Eggplant, Leek, Onion,

Sow Outdoors: Asparagus crowns, Arugula, Radish, Potatoes (tubers)

 

MARCH

Sow Indoor: Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Celery, Eggplant, Leeks, Lettuce, Onions, Peas, Peppers, Scallions, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes and tomatillos

Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Asparagus (crown), Chard, Chinese Cabbage (pak choy), Cilantro, Garlic (cloves), Lettuce, Kale, Mustard greens, Onion and Peas

 

Heirloom Radish

APRIL

Sow Indoor: Basil, Beans, Celery, Corn, Cucumber, Leek, Melon, Okra, Peas, Peppers, Summer Squash (4/15), Swiss Chard, Tomato and Watermelon (4/15)

Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Basil, Beets, Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, Cabbage (early types), Chinese Cabbage (pak choy), Carrots, Cauliflower, Celery (4/15), Chard, Cilantro, Collards, Dill, Endive, Fennel, Jerusalem Artichoke (tuber), Kale, Kohlrabi, Lettuce, Mustard Greens, Peas, Radicchio, Radish, Scallions, Sorrel, Spinach and Turnips

 

MAY

Sow Indoor: Basil,  Cucumber, Melon and Pumpkin

Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Basil (5/15), Beans (5/15), Beets, Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, Cabbage, Chinese Cabbage (pak choy), Carrots, Cauliflower, Celeriac, Celery, Chard, Cilantro, Collards, Corn, Cucumber, Dill (5/15), Eggplant, Fennel, Kale, Kohlrabi, Leek, Lettuce, Okra, Onion, Parsnips, Peas, Peppers,  Pumpkin (5/15), Radicchio, Radish, Rutabaga, Salad greens, Scallions, Spinach, Squash, summer (5/15) Squash (winter), TOMATOES, Turnips and Watermelon (5/15)

HEIRLOOM PEAS

 

JUNE

Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Basil, Beans, Beets, Carrots, Celery, Chard, Cilantro, Corn, Cucumbers, Dill, Eggplant, Endive, Kale, Lettuce, Melons, Okra, Onion, Peas, Peppers, Pumpkins, Radish, Scallions, Spinach, Squash (summer & winter), Tomatoes and Watermelon

 

JULY

Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Basil, Beans, Beets, Cabbage (early), Carrots, Chard, Cilantro, Collards, Fennel, Lettuce, Peas, Radish, Spinach, Squash (summer) and Turnips

 

AUGUST

Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Beets, Broccoli raab, Cabbage (early), Chinese Cabbage (pak choy), Cauliflower, Chard, Cilantro, Collards, Kale, Lettuce, Mustard greens, Peas, Radish, Salad greens, Spinach and Turnips

 

SEPTEMBER

Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Beets, Chinese Cabbage (pak choy), Endive, Lettuce, Kale, Radish and Salad greens

 

HELPFUL LINKS


I hope you have enjoyed another educational article.  If you have additional questions, please leave a comment below or send an email to mary@marysheirloomseeds.com
 

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Marys-Heirloom-Seeds/229833070442449

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