News

GROW Something Spectacular Posted on 23 Apr 12:40 , 0 comments

Mary's Heirloom Seeds
Quick Links
Join Our List
HELPFUL LINKS 
April 23, 2017
The act of growing food itself is Spectacular.
From those small seeds we grow large, healthy plants.  They provide nourishment for pollinators and then food for us to eat.

Heirloom varieties are so unique and today we're highlighting some of our favorite "spectacular" varieties.  If you have questions, please ask!

Grow something Spectacular!
We're excited to announce 2 NEW ARRIVALS added today at Mary's Heirloom Seeds

A French 2-3 lb. melon with light grey-green skin. The bright orange flesh is super sweet and very fragrant

Long, ribbed, dark green fruit can grow up to 18". They are very mild, sweet and burpless.

And now for more  
Spectacular Heirloom varieties
Also known as "Speckled Bays" or "Cranberry Bean" 
This pre-1800 heirloom is a great producer.


Scarlet Runner Bean was introduced sometime before 1750.
Scarlet Runner beans are very vigorous and can easily reach 20 feet tall.


Large savoy leaves are deep purplish red with white mid ribs





Small kernelled variety makes surprisingly large pops, yielding for a low hull/ corn ratio




Yummy little striped round balls of sunshine goodness! 
Introduced in 1894



Pak Choy is very cold hardy and grows over an extended period of time.  It's SO EASY to grow!!!




Extra large pumpkin often grown for county fairs and Halloween. Weighs up to 100 lbs. or more when well grown








Prolific 8' vines produce 1.5-2# fruits that have thick walls and a small seed cavity.












*Some of these are over 16 inches long*






BORAGE


I hope you have enjoyed our preview of some of the Spectacular Heirloom varieties available at
Mary's Heirloom Seeds.

We currently offer over 450 varieties of seeds.  Happy Planting!
If you have additional questions please feel free to ask. 

 

Happy Planting,

 

Mary's Heirloom Seeds, P. O. Box 3763, Ramona, CA 92065

EARTH DAY SALE APRIL 22nd Posted on 21 Apr 16:19 , 0 comments

Yes, this is JUST for Earth day 2017.

Don't miss out on this!

Mary's Heirloom Seeds
Quick Links
Join Our List
April 21, 2017
I'll make this short and sweet.
We've got seeds to plant.
Happy Earth Day!
Specials below expire April 22nd @ midnight
(that's tomorrow)
EARTH DAY SALE
APRIL 22, 2017


"IN THE KITCHEN" HERB GARDEN KIT

This is a great starter kit for your Kitchen Herb Garden.  Includes a full-pack of the following varieties:
Genovese Basil, Cilantro, Dill, Oregano, Sage, Tarragon & Thyme 

STARTER PACK option includes 24 coconut coir pellets, 7 plant markers and Garden Tools set



Includes 6 varieties of individually packed EDIBLE Flower varieties!
A unique mix of medicinal herbs and companion plant! 
Borage, Calendula, Nasturtium, Purple Coneflower (echinacea), Plains Coreopsis & Yarrow 




Make wonderful homemade salsa fresh from the garden! All individually packaged seeds.
Includes One packet of each:
   Brandywine Tomato, Jalapeno & Anaheim pepper, Red Burgundy Onion & Cilantro



Cultivator is 9" long
Spade is 10" long
Wood handles and leather loop on each to hang on pegboard hook


Derived from leguminous perennial alfalfa plant used for pasture and cover crop. Primary benefit of this pleasant smelling meal is increasing organic matter, although it is also a valuable plant-derived fertilizer.
  • NPK analysis is 2.8-0.29-2.4
  • Contains trace minerals and triaconatol
  • Excellent addition to the compost pile for nitrogen content and absorbency




SAGE 



 
HELPFUL LINKS 
If you have additional questions please feel free to ask. 

 

Happy Planting,

 

Mary's Heirloom Seeds, P. O. Box 3763, Ramona, CA 92065

Easiest Veggies to Grow from Seed to Harvest Posted on 19 Apr 08:24 , 0 comments

If you search the web, you'll find that many gardeners agree on the top easy veggies to grow. We all have our challenges and our favorites.


Last year, my best producer was the
Black Beauty Zucchini
Some of them grew over 18 inches long
(that's a wide-mouth quart jar for comparison)


You don't have to have a "farm" or land to grow food. If you're up to it, read my recent article "You Don't Need a Farm to Grow Your Own Food."


Just last year we posted about our Bucket Garden Project. "For this project, 100% of the buckets used are recycled. Some of the buckets were from previous projects and the yellow ones once held fresh kitty litter. The white buckets are food grade. The goal of this project to spend as little as possible and still grow food."

For simple seed starting, see our tutorial on



So let's get started!


People often ask, "What's the easiest veggie to grow?" For me, that's a tough one. If I had to choose just ONE, the easiest veggie with the best yield, it would have to be Swiss Chard. Swiss Chard is easy to grow from seed and provides continual harvest for several months after maturity. Swiss Chard can survive warm and hot climates so that's a plus.


What are the 9 Easiest Veggies to Grow?



Planting:
Soak seeds overnight in water before planting to ensure strong germination. Plant seeds half an inch deep and 3 inches apart. Set out seedlings 12 inches apart. Indoors or out, thin newly germinated seedlings with cuticle scissors instead of pulling them out. Chard seed capsules often contain two or more seeds. If more than one germinates, promptly snip off all but the strongest sprout at the soil line

Harvesting:
Twist off individual outer leaves and compost old leaves that have lost their glossy sheen. Three to five leaves can be picked from mature plants at a time, but be sure to leave the growing crown intact.

CHARD growing in a container

 

 


Radishes are a cool weather crop best planted in spring and autumn. Growing radishes during the hot summer months will cause them to bolt.

Planting: When preparing the planting bed, loosen the soil 6 to 10 inches deep, and mix in good compost or well-rotted manure. Sow seeds a half inch deep and 1 inch apart, in rows spaced 12 inches apart. After the seedlings appear, thin salad radishes to 3 inches apart; thin oriental radishes to 8 to 10 inches apart.

Harvest: Some Radish varieties such as Early Scarlet Globe radish can mature in as few as 22 days!
RADISH is a quick growing veggie!
From Mary's Blog:

 


Planting: All types of lettuce grow best when the soil is kept constantly moist, and outside temperatures range between 45 and 75 degrees Fahrenheit.

Prepare your planting bed by loosening the soil to at least 10 inches deep. Mix in an inch or so of good compost or well-rotted manure. Sow lettuce seeds a quarter of an inch deep and 1 inch apart in rows or squares, or simply broadcast them over the bed.

Harvest: Harvest lettuce in the morning, after the plants have had all night to plump up with water.
LETTUCE is a great container vegetable


For the sake of simplicity, I classify beans in 2 categories: Bush and Pole.

Bush beans are usually compact and grow close to the ground. Pole beans climb and require a trellis or other support. Bush beans tend to produce more beans in a shorter time, while pole beans will produce more over an entire season. Pole beans typically require much less.

Planting: Wait until well after the last frost before you plant the beans as they all like warm soil for germination. Plant the seeds about an inch below the surface and keep watered until the seed germinate

Harvest: Whether you grow pole beans or bush beans you will have an abundant harvest if you remember to pick regularly. Most beans are harvested before the seed grows too large, and the overall harvest will continue for many weeks if the beans are picked every day or so.
BEANS are one of my favorite!
From Mary's Blog:

 


Planting: In the spring, sow carrot seeds in fertile, well-worked soil about two weeks before your last frost date. In cool climates, continue planting every three weeks until midsummer. Sow your seeds about a quarter inch deep and 2 inches apart, in rows spaced at least 10 inches apart; carrots do well in double or triple rows. Thin seedlings to 4 to 6 inches apart, depending on the variety’s mature size.

Harvesting: Pull or dig spring-sown carrots when roots reach mature size and show rich color. Summer-sown carrots that mature in cool fall soil can be left in the ground longer, but should be dug before the ground freezes to preserve their quality
Delicious CARROTS
From Mary's Blog:

 


There are two types of cucumbers: slicing and pickling. Each type comes in several different varieties. The slicing types are long and usually grow to about 6 or 8 inches in length while the pickling types are shorter, reaching around 3 to 4 inches once mature.

Planting:
Thoroughly water the soil before plant­ing seeds half an inch deep and 6 inches apart. When the seedlings have three leaves, thin them to 12 inches apart, which is the spacing you should use if transplanting seedlings.

Harvest: To maximize production, harvest fruits as soon as they reach picking size. Pick daily, be­cause under ideal conditions, cucumber fruits can double in size in just one day. Use scissors or small shears to snip fruits with a short stub of stem attached.
Tiny CUCUMBER growing on the vine!
From Mary's Blog:

The two main things you can do to keep your summer squash plants healthy and productive are to provide plenty of water and to fertilize regularly. Water your plants when the top inch of soil is dry (test by poking your finger into the soil) and then, water deeply and gently so the water percolates down into the soil

Planting: Soak seeds in water for 24 hours before planting to ensure strong germination. Direct seed ½ to 1 inch deep into hills or rows.

Harvest: Harvest zucchini squash when the fruits are small. This will result in a more tender and flavorful squash.
Last year some of our ZUCCHINI grew HUGE!
From Mary's Blog:

 


There are two basic Types of Tomatoes: Determinate and Indeterminate.

Determinate tomatoes produce the fruit all at once. These are typically bush tomatoes, and make the best tomatoes for container gardening. Since all the tomatoes are ripe within a short period of time, these are great plant choices if you plan to can or have a short tomato growing season.

Indeterminate tomatoes grow on a vine. If properly cared for, will produce all season until the first frost.

For indoor seed starting: Start seeds indoors under bright fluorescent lights in early spring, about six to eight weeks before your last spring frost

Soak seeds in water for 24 hours before planting to ensure strong germination. Sow seeds 1/4 inch deep and gently cover with soil

The easiest way to grow tomatoes from seed is to plant seeds in small containers. Tomato seeds usually germinate in 5-14 days. Once seedlings are 4-8 inches tall, transplant into a 5-gallon container/bucket or into your garden.
Homegrown HEIRLOOM TOMATOES
From Mary's Blog:

 


Easy-to-grow beets do double-duty in the kitchen, producing tasty roots for baking, boiling or sautéing and fresh greens to boil or steam.

Planting: Begin planting beet seeds directly in the garden one month before your last spring frost date, followed by a second planting two to three weeks later. Beet seeds can germinate in cool soil, but they sprout best when soil temperatures are above 50 degrees

Start planting beets for fall harvest 10 to 12 weeks before your expected first fall frost.

Harvest: Beets can be harvested whenever they grow to the desired size. About 60 days are required for beets to reach 1 1/2 inches in diameter
Delicious BEETS
From Mary's Blog:

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Marys-Heirloom-Seeds/229833070442449




SEED SALE & EARTH DAY Info Posted on 01 Apr 14:19 , 0 comments

Mary's Heirloom Seeds
Quick Links
Join Our List
 
April 1, 2017
It's April 1st and there's no fooling going on here!  We've decided to offer another HUGE seed event to help you get a jump start on
Earth Day planting!
Our Sale starts TODAY and ends April 10th.
Seeds Listed below are $.99 to $2 each

 Many of you have asked about growing different varieties from seed so we'll continue to share our Growing Tips & Videos
EARTH DAY Info

From The Old Farmer's Almanac,

Ever wondered how Earth Day started? This observance arose from an interest in gathering national support for environmental issues.
In 1970, San Francisco activist John McConnell and Wisconsin Senator Gaylord Nelson separately asked Americans to join in a grassroots demonstration.
McConnell chose the spring equinox (March 21, 1970) and Nelson chose April 22.
Millions of people participated, and today Earth Day continues to be widely celebrated with events on both dates.
The most common practice of celebration is to plant new trees for Earth Day.
 
SEED SALE
April 1st thru April 10th
HELPFUL LINKS 
If you have additional questions please feel free to ask. 

 

Happy Planting,

 

Mary's Heirloom Seeds, P. O. Box 3763, Ramona, CA 92065

APRIL Seed Planting Guide for the US Posted on 31 Mar 05:54 , 0 comments

Are you ready for another in-depth seed planting guide for the US? 

At Mary's Heirloom Seeds it is our goal to help you grow the healthiest, most productive garden from heirloom seeds.  If you have additional questions, we are happy to help!

Mary's Heirloom Seeds
Quick Links
Join Our List
NEW ARRIVALS
 



March 31, 2017
In case you missed it, we offer region specific planting guide for entire year on our blog
Mary's 2017 Planting Guide


I don't know about you but sometimes even I need a reminder of what to plant next month.  Plus, we're always offering new specials and posting new seed varieties. 
 Before we get started, we have lowered the cost
of 6 of our Starter Kits thru April 15th.

This is a great opportunity and  
they make great gifts!
APRIL SEED PLANTING GUIDE FOR THE US  

**Please keep in mind that this is a general recommendation for each region listed.  If your area is experiencing unusually extreme changes in weather you'll need to adjust and plant accordingly**




Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Bush & Pole Beans, Lima Beans, Cantaloupe, Carrots, Collards, Corn, Cucumber, Eggplant (transplant), Endive, Kale, Lettuce, Melons, Mustard, Okra, Bunching Onions, Southern Peas, Peppers, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Sorrel, Spinach, Summer Squash, Tomato, and Watermelon. 
Herbs:
Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY  Herb!! Don't forget the Wildflowers!
Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Bush & Pole Beans, Lima Beans, Beets, Cabbage, Chinese Cabbage, Cantaloupes, Carrots, Cauliflower, Celery, Chard, Collards, Sweet Corn, Cucumber, Eggplant (transplant), Endive, Kale, Kohlrabi, Lettuce, Leeks, Melons, Mustard, Peas-Snow or English, Southern Peas, Peppers, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Scallion, Sorrel, Spinach, Summer Squash, Winter Squash, Swiss Chard, Tomato and Watermelon. 
Herbs:
Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY  Herb!! Don't forget the  Wildflowers!
Arugula Beans, Beets, Cabbage, Carrots, Celery, Chard, Collards, Corn, Cucumber, Endive, Kohlrabi, Lettuce, Melons, Mustard, Pak Choy, Peas, Peppers, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Scallion, Sorrel, Spinach, Squash, Tomato, Turnip and Watermelon. 
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY Herb!!! Don't forget the  Wildflowers!
Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Bush Beans & Pole Beans, Lima Beans, Beets, Broccoli, Cabbage, Cantaloupe, Carrots, Collards, Sweet Corn, Cucumber, Eggplant, Lettuce, Melons, Mustard, Bunching Onion, Southern Peas, Peppers, Sweet Potatoes, Radish, Radicchio, Spinach, Summer Squash, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes and Watermelon.
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY  Herb!! Don't forget the Wildflowers!


INDOOR planting for cooler/cold areas.  If your area is warming up or already warmed up, it might be time to plant outside! 
*If you are starting seeds indoors or in a greenhouse,  
you can plant just about anything*
 
Sow Indoors/Outdoors:  Artichoke, Beets, Broccoli, Cabbage, Carrots, Cauliflower, Celery, Eggplant, Kohlrabi, Leek, Melons, Onions, Peppers, Radish, Rutabaga, Scallion, Tomatoes and Turnips
GREENS: Arugula, Chard, Collards, Endive, Kale, Mustard, Radicchio and Sorrel can be sown indoors under bright lights and planted outside when there are two true leaves. Curly cress and arugula prefer to be sown directly outside
Herbs: Basil, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Fennel, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Peppermint, Rosemary, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache plant and Thyme. 
Don't forget the Wildflowers!
Sow Indoors: Eggplant, Peppers and Tomatoes
Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Beans, Beets, Cabbage, Carrots, Cauliflower, Celery, Chard, Collards, Corn, Cucumber, Endive, Kale, Kohlrabi, Lettuce, Melons, Mustard, Pak Choy, Peas, Peppers, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Scallion, Sorrel, Spinach, Squash, Tomato, Turnip and Watermelon. 
Transplant: Asparagus, Broccoli, Celery, Eggplant, Kohlrabi, Leek, Peppers and Tomatoes
Herbs: Basil, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Fennel, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Peppermint, Rosemary, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache plant and Thyme. 
Don't forget the Wildflowers!
Sow Indoors: Cabbage, Celery, Chard, Eggplant, Endive, Leek, Lettuce, Peppers, Radicchio, and Tomato
Sow Outdoors: Artichoke, Arugula, Beets, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Chard, Carrot, Endive, Kale, Kohlrabi, Leeks, Lettuce, Mustard, Onion, Pak Choy, Peas, Radish, Rutabaga, Scallions, Sorrel, Spinach and Turnips
Transplant: Artichoke, Asparagus, Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Kale, Kohlrabi, Leeks, Lettuce, Onions, Scallion, Sorrel and Spinach
Herbs: Basil, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Fennel, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Peppermint, Rosemary, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache plant and Thyme. 
Don't forget the Wildflowers!
CONTINUE READING


Sow Outdoors: Arugula Beans, Beets, Cabbage, Carrots, cauliflower, Celery, Chard, Collards, Corn, Cucumber, Eggplant (transplant), Endive, Kale, Kohlrabi, Lettuce, Melons, Mustard, Pak Choy, Peas, Peppers, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Scallion, Sorrel, Spinach, Squash, Tomato, Turnip and Watermelon. 
Transplant: Asparagus, Broccoli, Celery, Eggplant, Kohlrabi, Leek, Peppers and Tomatoes
Herbs: Basil, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Fennel, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Peppermint, Rosemary, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache plant and Thyme. 
Don't forget the Wildflowers!
 
Sow Indoors: Cabbage, Celery, Chard, Eggplant, Endive, Leek, Lettuce, Peppers, Radicchio, and Tomato
Sow Outdoors: Artichoke, Arugula, Beets, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Chard, Carrot, Endive, Kale, Kohlrabi, Leeks, Lettuce, Mustard, Onion, Pak Choy, Peas, Radish, Rutabaga, Scallions, Sorrel, Spinach and Turnips
Transplant: Artichoke, Asparagus, Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Kale, Kohlrabi, Leeks, Lettuce, Onions, Scallion, Sorrel and Spinach
Herbs: Basil, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Fennel, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Peppermint, Rosemary, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache plant and Thyme. 
Don't forget the Wildflowers!
Sow Indoors: Cabbage, Celery, Chard, Eggplant, Endive, Leek, Lettuce, Peppers, Radicchio, and Tomato
Sow Indoors: Artichoke, Arugula, Beets, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Chard, Carrot, Endive, Kale, Kohlrabi, Leeks, Lettuce, Mustard, Onion, Pak Choy, Peas, Radish, Rutabaga, Scallions, Sorrel, Spinach and Turnips
Herbs: Basil, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Fennel, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Peppermint, Rosemary, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache plant and Thyme. 
Don't forget the Wildflowers!

 ARIZONA  
 

 NEW MEXICO   

FLORIDA has been split in 3 regions 
 

 
Arugula, Bush & Pole Beans, Lima Beans, Chinese Cabbage, Southern Peas, Potatoes, Sweet Potatoes and Radish
Bush & Pole Beans, Lima Beans, Chinese Cabbage, Sweet Corn, Okra, Southern Peas, Sweet Potatoes, Summer Squash, Winter Squash and Swiss Chard    
CONTINUE READING


 Bush & Pole Beans, Lima Beans, Cantaloupes, Sweet Corn, Cucumber, Okra, Southern Peas, Sweet Potatoes, Summer Squash, Winter Squash, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes and Watermelon
CONTINUE READING
Helpful Links to
Get you Started    
If you have additional questions please feel free to ask. 

 

Happy Planting,

 

Mary's Heirloom Seeds, P. O. Box 3763, Ramona, CA 92065

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Marys-Heirloom-Seeds/229833070442449

Sign up for our E-Newsletter





Mary's Heirloom Seeds GIVEAWAY Posted on 24 Mar 06:17 , 70 comments

We LOVE Giveaways!!!!  As promised, to our followers on our FB page  we're sponsoring another GIVEAWAY!  Are you ready???

This is a super simple giveaway with loads of seeds!  We will pick ONE winner on March 29th
Giveaway runs from NOW thru Tuesday, March 28th @ midnight.
This Giveaway is open to residents of the US and Canada
 

Our Lucky winner will receive our "In the Kitchen" Garden Herb Pack


This is a great starter kit for your Kitchen Herb Garden.  Includes a full-pack of the following varieties:
-Genovese Basil
-Cilantro
-Dill
-Oregano
-Sage
-Tarragon
-Thyme

WITH the STARTER PACK option, which includes 


7 plant markers and Garden Tools set

For additional options at Mary's Heirloom seeds, check out our EASY STARTER KITS


Mary's Heirloom Seeds is a "mom and pop" small business created out of a desire to help people become more sustainable and self-sufficient. Our customers know that we are a simple phone call or email away
We currently offer over 450 varieties of Heirloom, open-pollinated, non-gmo non-hybrid, non-patented,  untreated and organic seeds.   Mary has signed the Safe Seed pledge AND the the Declaration of Seed Freedom. 
 
Are you ready to enter the giveaway?


Giveaway is open to all Residents of the US and Canada.
Giveaway opens 3/24/2017 and ends Tuesday, March 28th @ midnight
All giveaway entrants will be added to Mary's Heirloom Seeds mailing list.
Your information is never sold and we never send spam emails.


a Rafflecopter giveaway

Planting Wildflowers in Your Garden Posted on 11 Mar 07:10 , 0 comments

One of the best things about wildflowers is how easy they are to grow!  In case you missed it, we recently posted an article of EDIBLE FLOWERS at Mary's Heirloom Seeds!

Plan
Check for your last frost date and plant after this has passed.
Choose a spot on your property that gets 6 or more hours of direct sun a day.
Prepare your soil be clearing the area of all existing growth. Simply dig up everything that is growing, turn the soil and rake the area flat. If this is an area that has never before been gardened, you may need to till the area up to remove growth.
 
Plant
Mix the seeds with sand for better visibilty and scatter the seeds directly on top of the soil.
We recommend lighly compressing the seeds into the soil, making sure not to bury them. You can either walk on them, use a board or just pat down with you hands.
 
Grow
Water so that the soil is moist, not soaking wet, until the seedlings are about 4-6" tall. After that, the seedlings will survive on natural rains. If you are experiencing very dry weather, we recommend watering occassionally.
Spring, summer and fall are all wildflower planting times, depending on your region, your weather, and the way you want to approach establishing your meadow. No matter when or where you plant, site preparation is roughly the same. But the first consideration is not the season; it's your climate.
 
For mild-winter areas: If you're planting in a warm place such as California, Florida or southern Texas, with minimal — or no — winter frost, you can plant almost anytime, except during your hottest season. Best time is just before your rainiest season begins, and when you know the weather will not be too hot for young seedlings. In Florida, fall is best. In California, most wildflowers are planted during the winter to take advantage of California's greening in early spring.
 
Nasturtiums
For all areas with killing frost: If you have definite killing frost in winter, things are different. In these areas (most of the country) spring and fall are both fine for planting, and each has its advantages.
 
Wildflowers can re-seed and continue to grow for many years if planted in an area that will allow them to flourish.  Saving seeds from these wildflowers is easy and will ensure flowers for the future.
 
Companion Planting with Flowers


Companion planting is based around the idea that certain plants can benefit others when planted next to, or close to one another.
 
Companion planting exists to benefit certain plants by giving them pest control, naturally without the need to use chemicals, and in some cases they can give a higher crop yield.

Marigolds: Basil, broccoli, cabbage, cucumbers, eggplant, gourds, kale, potatoes, squash and tomatoes.  Often called the "workhorse" of pest deterrents.

Bachelor Button: Attracts pollinators to the garden
 
Lavender: cabbage, cauliflower and fruit trees

Nasturtium: cucumbers, melon, squash, cabbage, broccoli, tomatoes, celery, carrots and radish.  Repels Carrot fly, Japanese beetle, whitefly, aphid and cabbage moth.  


Echinacea Purpurea
Sunflower: Corn, squash and beans.  Attracts pollinators to the garden.

Lupine: nitrogen rich.  Attracts pollinators.  Traps aphids!
Echinacea and Yarrow:  Attracts pollinators to the garden. *Also reported to have medicinal properties*
 
More great companions include:
Additional info on Companion Planting:
I hope you have enjoyed another educational article.  if you have additional questions, please leave a comment below or send an email to mary@marysheirloomseeds.com

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Marys-Heirloom-Seeds/229833070442449

Sign up for our E-Newsletter



NEW for 2017 @ Mary's Heirloom Seeds Posted on 08 Mar 07:24 , 0 comments


 
Mary's Heirloom Seeds
Quick Links
Join Our List
*NEW*
MELONS

Banana Melon


Casaba Melon



March 8, 2017
Are you already planning your 2017 garden?

This is going to be a LOOOOONG post.  Why?  Because we've added over 85 Heirloom seed varieties for 2017 @ Mary's Heirloom Seeds.  We are so excited to announce these recent additions to our already amazing stock of Heirloom Seeds.  Woohoo!!!
 
ALL NEW for 2017! 
Our official collection of NEW additions at 
Mary's Heirloom Seeds for 2017
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Flame Lettuce 
 
 
 
 
 






Big Red Ripper Southern Pea







































**Also called Patty Pan squash**




Stay tuned for more information about planting and growing seeds!

If you have additional questions please feel free to ask. 

 

Happy Planting,

 

Mary's Heirloom Seeds, P. O. Box 3763, Ramona, CA 92065

EDIBLE FLOWERS @ Mary's Heirloom Seeds Posted on 04 Mar 07:48 , 1 comment

Safety First! As lovely as eating flowers can be, it can also be a little ... deadly! Not to scare you off or anything.
-Eat flowers you know to be consumable and preferably flowers you have grown yourself.
-Do not eat roadside flowers or those picked in public parks. Both may have been treated with pesticide or herbicide, and roadside flowers may be polluted by car exhaust.
-Eat only the petals, and remove pistils and stamens before eating
As with any new food, use caution.
 
Some of the varieties listed are "leafy" crops that bolt (flower) and the flowers are edible.
 
JERUSALEM ARTICHOKE
Often used for pickling purposes. Fresh tuber tastes like a water chestnut and is used in salads. Tubers can also be cooked like potatoes. The edible portion is the tuber or swollen end of an underground stem, which in some respects resembles a potato.
Flowers resemble small sunflowers or large daisies. Ripens in late fall.
 
ALLIUMS
All blossoms from the allium family (leeks,chives, garlic, garlic chives) are edible and flavorful!


Both flowers and leaves have a subtle anise or licorice flavor.


Petals are edible. Avoid the bitter calyx.


Blossoms come in a variety of colors, from white to pink to lavender


 
 
Blossoms are a lovely blue hue and taste like cucumber!


 
 
Small and daisylike, the flowers have a sweet flavor and are often used in tea. Ragweed sufferers may be allergic to chamomile.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
I hope you have enjoyed another educational article.  if you have additional questions, please leave a comment below or send an email to mary@marysheirloomseeds.com

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Marys-Heirloom-Seeds/229833070442449

Sign up for our E-Newsletter



MARCH Seed Planting Guide for the US By Region Posted on 01 Mar 08:48 , 0 comments

IT'S FINALLY MARCH!  We're planting more seeds this week and looking forward to SPRING!

Mary's Heirloom Seeds
Quick Links
Join Our List
NEW ARRIVALS
 








March 1, 2017
In case you missed it, we offer region specific planting guide for entire year on our blog
Mary's 2017 Planting Guide


I don't know about you but sometimes even I need a reminder of what to plant next month.  Plus, we're always offering new specials and posting new seed varieties.

MARCH SEED PLANTING GUIDE FOR THE US  

**Please keep in mind that this is a general recommendation for each region listed.  If your area is experiencing unusually extreme changes in weather you'll need to adjust and plant accordingly**
 


Sow Outdoors: Artichoke, Asparagus, Bush & Pole Beans, Lima Beans, Beets, Carrots, Chinese Cabbage, Celery, Collards, Sweet Corn, Eggplant, Fennel, Lettuce, Melons, Bunching Onions, Peppers, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Scallion, Spinach, Swiss Chard,
Tomato and Watermelon.
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY  Herb!! Don't forget the  Wildflowers!
CONTINUE READING


Arugula, Bush & Pole Beans, Beets, Carrots, Sweet Corn, Endive, Leeks, Lettuce, Parsnips, Peas-Snow or English, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Spinach, Swiss Chard and Tomatoes 
Basil, Chives, Cilantro, Dill, Parsley, Rosemary, Sage, Tarragon and Thyme
*Depending on your region, you might want to look at the APRIL planting list as well* 
CONTINUE READING



Arugula, Bush & Pole Beans, Beets, Cabbage, Carrots, Collards, Corn, Cucumber, Eggplant, Kale, Kohlrabi, Lettuce, Melons, Mustard, Peas, Peppers, Pumpkins, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Scallion, Spinach, Squash, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes, Turnips and Watermelon.
Don't forget the HERBS and Wildflowers!
CONTINUE READING


Sow Indoors: Eggplant and Basil
Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Artichoke, Asparagus, Bush Beans & Pole Beans, Lima Beans, Beets, Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Cantaloupe, Carrots, Celery, Collards, Sweet Corn, Cucumber, Kale, Kohlrabi, Lettuce, Melons, Mustard, Peas- Garden & Snow, Peppers, Potatoes, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Scallion, Spinach, Summer Squash, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes and Turnips.
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY  Herb!! Don't forget the  Wildflowers!


FLORIDA has been split in 3 regions 
  

Arugula, Bush & Pole Beans, Lima Beans, Cantaloupe, Carrots, celery, Chinese Cabbage,Sweet Corn, Cucumber, Endive, Lettuce Melons, Mustard, Okra, Bunching Onions, Southern Peas, Peppers, Sweet Potatoes, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Scallion, Summer Spinach, Summer Squash & Winter Squash, Swiss Chard and Watermelon 
CONTINUE READING


Amaranth, Arugula, Bush & Pole Beans, Lima Beans, Cantaloupes, Carrots, Celery, Chinese Cabbage, Sweet Corn, Cucumber, Kohlrabi, Okra, Bunching Onions, Southern Peas, Peppers, Sweet Potatoes, Radish, Spinach, Summer Squash, Winter Squash, Swiss Chard, Cherry Tomatoes and Watermelon   
CONTINUE READING



Amaranth, Arugula, Bush & Pole Beans, Lima Beans, Cantaloupes, Carrots, Sweet Corn, Cucumber, Eggplant, Kohlrabi, Okra, Bunching Onions, Peas-Snow or English, Southern Peas, Peppers, Sweet Potatoes, Radish, Spinach, Summer Squash, Winter Squash, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes and Watermelon
 Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow 
Pretty much EVERY  Herb!! Don't forget the  Wildflowers!   
CONTINUE READING


Arugula, Basil, Lima Beans, Snap Beans, Yardlong Beans, Beets, Carrots, Corn, Cucumber, Melons, Okra, Onion, Peanuts, Pumpkin, Radishes, Summer Squash,
Winter Squash, Sunflower, Tomatoes and Watermelon
Plant Herbs and Wildflowers
Transplants: Artichoke, Basil, Eggplant,
Peppers and Tomatoes


*If you are starting seeds indoors or in a greenhouse,
you can plant just about anything*
Arugula, Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Eggplant, Kale, Leeks, Lettuce, Onions, Peas, Peppers, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes and Turnips
Plant Herbs and Wildflowers

INDOOR planting for cooler/cold areas.  If your area is warming up or already warmed up, it might be time to plant outside! 
*If you are starting seeds indoors or in a greenhouse,  
you can plant just about anything*
 
Sow Indoors/Outdoors:  Artichoke, Broccoli, Cabbage, Celery, Chard, Collards, Eggplant, Endive, Kale, Kohlrabi, Leek, Lettuce, Onions, Pak Choy, Peppers, Radicchio, Scallion, Tomatoes, Basil, Chives, Cilantro, Marjoram, Parsley, Rosemary, Sage, Savory, and Thyme
Direct Sow: Arugula, Lettuce, Mustard and Spinach
CONTINUE READING


Sow Indoors: Basil, Broccoli, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Celery, Chard, Eggplant, Kale, Kohlrabi, Leek, Lettuce, Onion, Pak Choy, Peppers, Radicchio, Tomato, Chives, Fennel, Parsley, Oregano, Sage, Tarragon and Thyme.
Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Beets, Carrot, Kohlrabi, Lettuce,
Pak Choy, Peas, Radish, Radicchio, Spinach, Turnips,
Outdoor Herbs: Cilantro and Parsley
CONTINUE READING


Sow Indoors: Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Celery, Chard, Eggplant, Endive, Kale, Leek, Lettuce, Onion, Peppers, Radicchio, Scallion, Spinach and Tomato.
Indoor Herbs: Basil, Chives, Cilantro, Parsley, Rosemary, Sage, Tarragon and Thyme.
CONTINUE READING


Sow Indoors: Broccoli, Cabbage, Celery, Eggplant, Endive, Fennel, Kale, Kohlrabi, Leek, Lettuce, Onions, Pak Choy, Peppers, Radicchio, Scallions, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes
Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Asparagus, Beets, Carrots, Collards, Endive, Lettuce, Pak Choy, Parsnips, Peas, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Sorrel, Spinach and Turnips
Herbs: Basil, Chives, Cilantro, Dill, Parsley, Sage,
Thyme and Wildflowers!
CONTINUE READING


Sow Indoors: Broccoli, Cabbage, Celery, Swiss Chard, Eggplant, Endive, Kale, Leek, Lettuce, Onions, Pak Choy, Peppers, Radicchio, Tomato.  Indoor Herbs: Basil, Chives, Cilantro, Oregano, Parsley, Rosemary, Sage and Thyme.
Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Beet, Carrot, Lettuce, Pak Choy, Peas, Radish, Radicchio, Sorrel, Spinach and Turnip.
Don't forget the Wildflowers!
CONTINUE READING



Helpful Links to
Get you Started    

BUILD A RAISED BED!   
We shared our Raised Bed tutorial last year but we have had so many requests lately that we shared again this year with Updates!


For 4 beds @ 4ft X 8ft we used about
5 cubic yards of soil.
Water the bed once it's filled with dirt and 
We also posted an article about
SOIL Recipes for raised bed gardens

TIME TO PLANT HEIRLOOM SEEDS!

Complete details on our blog
If you have additional questions please feel free to ask. 
Happy Planting,
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Marys-Heirloom-Seeds/229833070442449

Sign up for our E-Newsletter