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HAPPY NEW YEAR with Over 40 New Arrivals! Posted on 31 Dec 17:49 , 0 comments

Mary's Heirloom Seeds
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December 31, 2017
"The garden suggests there might be a place where we can meet nature halfway."
-Michael Pollan
We're gearing up for the 2018 planting season!
Below is our HUGE compilation of New Arrivals for 2018 and we are so excited!

As an added bonus, We are giving away small garden notebooks with purchase of $30 or more
Between Dec 31st and Jan 2nd as a
special New Year's gift.


If you have additional question, please ask

Enjoy!


NEW ARRIVALS FOR 2018
 
If you have placed an order for
Organic Seed Potatoes....
We will begin shipping out to customers in Warmer climates such as Florida as early as January 1.

If you are interested in purchasing
Organic Seed Potatoes, please do not wait til planting time as we will be sold out by then.
  
 
NEW ARRIVALS
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 *NEW FOR 2018* 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
If you have additional questions please feel free to ask. 

 

Happy Planting,

 

Mary's Heirloom Seeds, P. O. Box 3763, Ramona, CA 92065

NEW ARRIVALS for 2018 - Part 2 Posted on 15 Dec 04:48 , 0 comments

Mary's Heirloom Seeds
Quick Links
Join Our List
December 15, 2017
As promised, Mary's Heirloom Seeds continues to add to our existing selection of Heirloom, 
Open-Pollinated seeds.
 
This week, we're adding more varieties!
 
Also, Pre-Orders of Organic Seed Potatoes 
are now available!!!
 
Harvest dates will vary based on variety of potato.  Generally, potatoes take 90-120 days to harvest.
  Under optimal conditions, you can expect to harvest 10-15 pounds of potatoes for every pound of seed potato planted. 

Find out when to plant potatoes
NEW ARRIVALS for 2018
PART 2  

105 days.  These unique, Very flat, pure white pumpkins that are unique and tasty. Very sweet orange flesh is perfect for pies and baking
 
 
70-80 days.  Determinate.   
Great for sauces, salsas and pastes
 
 
 75 days. Roots grow 7"-8" long and are great raw or cooked.
 
 
 75 days. Popular Japanese variety for home or market; deep orange, stubby roots are mild and sweet.
 
 
 85 days. One of the best orange-flesh watermelons. Very crisp, sweet, and flavorful deep orange flesh
 
 
 100 days. VERY RARE. Introduced to America about 1862 by James Hogg, of Yorkville, New York, from seeds his brother Thomas sent him from Japan.
 
 
 110 days.  An heirloom to the Buffalo, New York area, it was first distributed to select members of the Massachusetts Horticultural Society by Mr. Ives in the Spring of 1833 and quickly became available as a commercial variety shortly thereafter.
 
 
105 days.  These unique, Very flat, pure white pumpkins that are unique and tasty. Very sweet orange flesh is perfect for pies and baking. 


 YIPPIE! 
WE LOVE HEIRLOOM SEEDS!

  
NEW ARRIVALS for 2018
PART 1 
FRENCH GARDEN BEANS
50 days.  Tall, very upright bush.  Beans hang neatly and in clusters. Long thin podded French bush bean, selected for home garden cultivation.
 
 
 
CANARY YELLOW SWISS CHARD 
60 days. This Swiss chard produces a stunning canary yellow stem that deeply contrasts with its sea green leaves held above.  Produces large leaves and Very productive.  
 
 
65 days.  This unique heirloom Originated in Armenia.
Fruits are light green with darker green striped ribs which curl into "s" shaped fruits. 
 
JARRAHDALE PUMPKIN
110 days.  A New Zealand heirloom, Jarrahdale pumpkin has a slate blue, ribbed exterior and a deep delicious orange interior flesh. 
 
 
 
BIRDHOUSE BOTTLE GOURD 
95 days. This long-handled ball-shaped gourd can be hollowed out to make attractive birdhouses, a big dipper gourd, or musical instruments. 
 
 
 
ANCHO POBLANO PEPPER 
75 days. Also called Ancho Pepper in its dried form, the Poblano is a pepper of many wonderful uses including salsa, grilling, stir fries or stuffed for chile rellenos and substituted in any dish for bell pepper.
 
BULGARIAN CARROT PEPPER
75-80 days.  Bulgarian Carrot Pepper grows up to 18" tall and produces peppers that are about 3 1/2" long. 
70 days.   The Hungarian wax pepper is a canary yellow chile pepper also known as the hot yellow pepper or hot wax pepper. The Hungarian wax is closely related to the mild banana pepper.  
DILL, DUKAT
Aromatic, never bitter or overly pungent, try this one for the sweetest of all dills. With a delicate fragrance, Dukat stays in the leaf stage longer than other varieties
ROX ORANGE SUGAR CANE SORGHUM
Rox orange is an old time sorghum favorite for syrup.   Rox Orange sorghum is grown like corn, but prefers well drained sandy loam. Rox Orange will grow to 8 ft. tall and can be cut for silage after 70-80 days, or be used for livestock grain if left to full maturity.
THOMAS LAXTON PEA
65 days.  Any pea that was introduced over 100 years ago and is still widely grown should tell you volumes.  Reliable, consistent, and sweet are just some of the words used to describe this pea.
Organic Seed Potatoes   
We are currently offering PRE-ORDERS of
select varieties of
ORGANIC *Non-GMO* SEED POTATOES
Depending on your location AND date of purchase, seed potatoes will be available to ship as early as January 1.
*Price and availability subject to change*
    


Remember, even if planting time in your area isn't until March or April, NOW is the time to start thinking about Organic Seed Potatoes 

 
PURPLE MAJESTY 





 


Please purchase additional items in a separate order.    
Items ordered with Organic Seed Potatoes will ship together after January 1st.

As we ship on a first come, first serve basis, your order may not ship until days or weeks later. You will receive an email when your order ships.


Check out Mary's 2017 Planting Guide
for more planting guides and Growing Tips 
 
As always, if you have additional questions please feel free to ask!
This data has been compiled from our own research as well as feedback from our customers.
 
Helpful ARTICLES    
If you have additional questions please feel free to ask. 

 

Happy Planting,

 

Mary's Heirloom Seeds, P. O. Box 3763, Ramona, CA 92065

NEW ARRIVALS for 2018 (part 1) Posted on 06 Dec 08:07 , 0 comments

Mary's Heirloom Seeds
Quick Links
Join Our List
December 5, 2017
As promised, Mary's Heirloom Seeds continues to add to our existing selection of Heirloom, 
Open-Pollinated seeds.
 
This week, we're adding more varieties!
 
Also, Pre-Orders of Organic Seed Potatoes 
are now available!!!
 
Harvest dates will vary based on variety of potato.  Generally, potatoes take 90-120 days to harvest.
  Under optimal conditions, you can expect to harvest 10-15 pounds of potatoes for every pound of seed potato planted. 

Find out when to plant potatoes
NEW ARRIVALS for 2018  
FRENCH GARDEN BEANS
50 days.  Tall, very upright bush.  Beans hang neatly and in clusters. Long thin podded French bush bean, selected for home garden cultivation.
 
 
CANARY YELLOW SWISS CHARD
60 days. This Swiss chard produces a stunning canary yellow stem that deeply contrasts with its sea green leaves held above.  Produces large leaves and Very productive. 
 
 
65 days.  This unique heirloom Originated in Armenia.
Fruits are light green with darker green striped ribs which curl into "s" shaped fruits. 
JARRAHDALE PUMPKIN
110 days.  A New Zealand heirloom, Jarrahdale pumpkin has a slate blue, ribbed exterior and a deep delicious orange interior flesh. 
 
 
BIRDHOUSE BOTTLE GOURD
95 days. This long-handled ball-shaped gourd can be hollowed out to make attractive birdhouses, a big dipper gourd, or musical instruments.
 
 
ANCHO POBLANO PEPPER
75 days. Also called Ancho Pepper in its dried form, the Poblano is a pepper of many wonderful uses including salsa, grilling, stir fries or stuffed for chile rellenos and substituted in any dish for bell pepper.
BULGARIAN CARROT PEPPER
75-80 days.  Bulgarian Carrot Pepper grows up to 18" tall and produces peppers that are about 3 1/2" long. 
70 days.   The Hungarian wax pepper is a canary yellow chile pepper also known as the hot yellow pepper or hot wax pepper. The Hungarian wax is closely related to the mild banana pepper.  
DILL, DUKAT
Aromatic, never bitter or overly pungent, try this one for the sweetest of all dills. With a delicate fragrance, Dukat stays in the leaf stage longer than other varieties
ROX ORANGE SUGAR CANE SORGHUM
Rox orange is an old time sorghum favorite for syrup.   Rox Orange sorghum is grown like corn, but prefers well drained sandy loam. Rox Orange will grow to 8 ft. tall and can be cut for silage after 70-80 days, or be used for livestock grain if left to full maturity.
THOMAS LAXTON PEA
65 days.  Any pea that was introduced over 100 years ago and is still widely grown should tell you volumes.  Reliable, consistent, and sweet are just some of the words used to describe this pea.

 YIPPIE! 
WE LOVE HEIRLOOM SEEDS!

BACK IN STOCK  
 
Organic Seed Potatoes   
We are currently offering PRE-ORDERS of
select varieties of
ORGANIC *Non-GMO* SEED POTATOES
Depending on your location AND date of purchase, seed potatoes will be available to ship as early as January 1.
*Price and availability subject to change*
    


Remember, even if planting time in your area isn't until March or April, NOW is the time to start thinking about Organic Seed Potatoes 

 
PURPLE MAJESTY 





 


Please purchase additional items in a separate order.    
Items ordered with Organic Seed Potatoes will ship together after January 1st.

As we ship on a first come, first serve basis, your order may not ship until days or weeks later. You will receive an email when your order ships.


Check out Mary's 2017 Planting Guide
for more planting guides and Growing Tips 
 
As always, if you have additional questions please feel free to ask!
This data has been compiled from our own research as well as feedback from our customers.
 
Helpful ARTICLES    
If you have additional questions please feel free to ask. 

 

Happy Planting,

 

Mary's Heirloom Seeds, P. O. Box 3763, Ramona, CA 92065

Food Gardens are Part of the Solution Posted on 29 Nov 10:42 , 0 comments

I love reading about people in their community growing food and building relationships thru their food gardens.  This particular story touched my heart so I'm sharing with you too

11 Year Old Boy Creates Community Garden so No One Goes Hungry
Hurt told 24-Hour News 8 he started gardening when he was 7 years old and planted beans. His mom said the beans provided extra food for the family.
Hurt is now expanding his garden to help others. The community garden opened earlier in May.
“I got rows of tomatoes, one, two,” Hurt described. “This one’s got two tomatoes.”

But this land is more than just a garden of fruits and vegetables.
“I got it from across the school because the lady over there donated it to me so that’s when I got it and also I wanted to do that to feed the community,” Hurt added.
He said the garden is open to everyone and people can stop by whenever to pick fresh fruits and vegetables.
“Because it’s the right thing to help feed the community, and it feeds people so nobody goes hungry,” Hurt said.


Helping people grow the healthiest gardens possible is our passion.  This is one of many reasons we started Mary's Heirloom Seeds.  Every day we are working to create additional planting tutorials and videos.  Our Gardens Fundraiser at Mary's Heirloom Seeds helps fund additional seed donations to school gardens, community and non-profit gardens and church gardens across the country.  Every Year our donation program GROWS! 
https://www.marysheirloomseeds.com/

Gardening can reduce stress & anxiety, it can bring people together and it's a great education tool.  Food gardens offer all of those benefits and more!

You may already know from numerous articles I've shared that I'm a huge advocate of Growing Food no matter what!  If you're curious, read

You Don't Need a farm to Grow Food

Start A Bucket Garden

Growing In Containers

9 Easiest Vegetables to grow from Seed to Harvest

https://www.marysheirloomseeds.com/


Food Gardens can feed people!!!  I know that's an obvious statement but with so many hungry people in the world and right here in our own community, it needs to be said.  We can make a difference one food garden at a time.

Food Gardens can solve the issue of food deserts.  "Food deserts are defined  as parts of the country vapid of fresh fruit, vegetables, and other healthful whole foods, usually found in impoverished areas. This is largely due to a lack of grocery stores, farmers’ markets, and healthy food providers." source

Food Gardens can help save the Pollinators!  2018 is the Year of the pollinators!  If you grow organic and WITH nature, there is always a place for beneficial insects.  We use Companion Planting as our first line of defense against pests.  A healthy, well fed soil system can produce healthy plant which do not require expensive sprays and treatments.

The agri-chem companies want you to believe that GMOs are meant to "feed the world" but that is a myth.  Read GMO Crops Do Not Cure Hunger.  The answer to feeding more people is for the community to get involved with their food production.  The amount of cancer causing pesticides and herbicides used every year is in the billions of pounds.  If we all took responsibility for our food and grow beyond organic standards, we could make a GLOBAL change for the benefit of everyone.

From PPS, "Safety and crime reduction  -  There is evidence linking community gardens to improved safety in neighborhoods – showing that crime decreases in neighborhoods as the amount of green space increases. Two reports in the Journal of Environment and Behavior studied (1) the impact nature has on mental fatigue (often a precursor of aggression and violence), and (2) the relationship between green space and inner city crime rates. The research determined that aggression and violence was “significantly lower among those people who lived near some green space than those who lived in more barren conditions.”"

Kids love to grow food!  Food Gardens are a great educational tool.  As part of our seed donation program at Mary's Heirloom Seeds, we work with several homeschool groups and co-ops across the country and in our own community.  My sister and her kids grow all sorts of deliciousness in the garden.

Why Heirloom Seeds?
From Seed Saving Part 1, "Saving Seeds from your garden bounty is like putting money away for a rainy day.  Best of all, saving your own seeds is one of many ways to regain control of your family's source of food"
Open-pollinated, heirloom seeds will grow seeds that can be saved and re-planted year after year. Hybrid seeds can be sterile and may not produce true offspring from saved seeds.

I hope you have enjoyed another educational article.  If you have additional questions, please leave a comment below or send an email to mary@marysheirloomseeds.com

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Marys-Heirloom-Seeds/229833070442449

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About Moringa Oleifera Posted on 11 Nov 08:52 , 1 comment

We're growing Moringa Oleifera on our homestead!  This is one of those things that makes me excited about growing.  Moringa is a new one for us here.

What is Moringa Oleifera?

Commonly known as Moringa, it is said to be "the most nutritious tree found on the earth." Moringa tree grows in tropical conditions and this tree is native to Indian and Africa.

From Mary's Heirloom Seeds,
It is a fast-growing, drought-resistant tree, native to the southern foothills of the Himalayas in northwestern India, and widely cultivated in tropical and subtropical areas where its young seed pods and leaves are used as vegetables. It can also be used for water purification and hand washing, and is sometimes used in herbal medicine.




From Moringa . com,
Moringa leaves, which is the most nutritious part of the Moringa tree, is loaded with Vitamins and Minerals. For this reason it is known as the Nutrition powerhouse. Fresh Moringa leaves contain 70 to 75% moisture and when they are dried the moisture content goes down to less than 8% and hence the nutrients becomes much more concentrated. That is the reason why people prefer to use Moringa Leaf Powder in their supplements.


Leaves can be harvested every 30-45 days throughout the year.


MORINGA SEEDLING

Moringa oleifera is a small size tree with approximately 5 to 10 m height. It is cultivated all over the world due to its multiple utilities. Every part of Moringa is used for certain nutritional and/or medicinal propose. Containing over 90 nutrients and 46 antioxidants, non-GMO Moringa (Moringa Oleifera) is one of nature’s most nutritious foods. Ideal for helping our bodies maintain optimum health and balance. Because moringa leaf powder does not spoil, this makes an excellent long-term survival food.


GROWING MORINGA OLEIFERA
From Trees For Life


To grow from seed:

Moringa seeds have no dormancy periods and can be planted as soon as they are mature.

  1. Choose an area with light and sandy soil, not heavy with clay or water-logged.
  2. Dig holes 1 ft (30 cm) square and 1 ft deep. Back-fill the holes with loose soil. Compost or manure will help the tree grow better, even though Moringa trees can grow in poor soils.
  3. Plant 3 to 5 seeds in each hole, 2 in. (5 cm) apart. Plant the seeds no deeper than three times the width of the seed (approximately ½ in. or 1.5 cm -- the size of one's thumbnail).
  4. Keep the soil moist enough so that the top soil will not dry and choke the emerging saplings, but it should not be too wet or else the seeds can drown and rot.
  5. When the saplings are four to six inches tall, keep the healthiest sapling in the ground and remove the rest. Termites and nematodes can kill a young sapling. Take measures to protect saplings from these two dangers.
 
Transplanting
The ground where the trees are to be planted should be light and sandy, not heavy with clay or water-logged.
Dig a hole 1 ft (30 cm) square and 1 ft deep. Backfill with loose soil. Adding compost or manure will help the trees grow better.

  1. Water the planting holes one day before transplanting the seedlings.
  2. Plant seedlings in the late afternoon to avoid the hot sun the first day.
  3. Make a hole in the pit to accept all soil in the bag. Carefully cut open the sack and place the seedling in the planting hole. Be careful to keep the soil around the seedling's roots intact.
  4. Pack soil around the seedling base.
  5. Water only lightly for the first few days.
If the seedlings fall over, tie them to a stick for support. Protect young saplings from termites and nematodes


I hope you have enjoyed another educational article.  If you have additional questions, please leave a comment below or send an email to mary@marysheirloomseeds.com


http://www.facebook.com/pages/Marys-Heirloom-Seeds/229833070442449

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Starter Kits & Seed Combo Packs SALE Posted on 09 Nov 07:06 , 0 comments

 
Mary's Heirloom Seeds
Quick Links
Join Our List
 
 
Growing Tips, Tutorials & Videos   
November 8, 2016

All over the radio and around I'm seeing advertising for Black Friday sales and a few of my friends have asked if we're having one as well.
Well, the answer is NO...and YES!

This year, we're spending time with our families and not stuck behind a computer. 
Thursday we'll all get together at my sister's house and Friday I'm spending the day with my Dad, behind the counter at his retail shop.

We're starting a Sale TODAY that will run
thru Sunday, November 27th
 
*While Supplies last* 

Before we get to the Seed Sale, just a quick reminder. Our Gardens Fundraiser is going thru Dec 19th. We've added more items.
Check back often for more NEW Items and
Thank You for helping us help others!
SEEDS, COMBO PACKS & STARTER KITS
SALE Ends November 27th
*Click the Images for complete details*

We've added Organic Plant Food samplers to 3 of our Combo Packs/Starter Kits AND they're On Sale!
(Bonus Plant food included)
(HUGE savings)
(Plant food available)
ALL of the Combo Packs and Starter Kits listed here are ON SALE NOW!





Sprout Jar
(Includes instructions)



 

The 6 Month SUPER Membership includes 8 seeds packs the first month and 2 seed packs each month for a total of 6 months. *Plus 4 packs of Organic Wildflowers* 

(That's Amelia, one of our chickens)
(Only 6 left)

If you have additional questions please feel free to ask. 

 

Happy Planting,

 

Mary's Heirloom Seeds, P. O. Box 3763, Ramona, CA 92065

15 Survival Seeds to Stockpile Posted on 26 Oct 15:26 , 0 comments

TIP: Stocking up on seeds for SHTF only works if you're actively growing and rotating seeds!
Please don't fall for the "lasts indefinitely" claim from most survival seed companies. Seeds most definitely have a shelf life (even in mylar bags). No one grows a perfect garden every year so if you're planning on growing, PRACTICE is essential.
We have been asked many time if we plan on offering a "survival seed pack" but it's just not something we want to encourage.  We do however offer several Seed Combo packs as well as a Back to Basics Homestead pack.
 
There are many reason to be prepared and not all of them are a complete collapse of our system.  Sickness, loss of a job or a reduction in wages are just a few very personal reasons to prepare for the unexpected.  
Being prepared doesn't necessarily need to be for TEOTWAWKI (the end of the world as we know it).
 

Reasons for Food Insecurities include
Job Loss
Sickness
Rising food costs
Crop failure due to Weather or Water Shortage
Farm labor shortage
Interruptions in transportation of food
Civil unrest
Natural Disasters, as we've seen in recent months, are another VERY important reasons to be prepared.  Due to our aging infrastructure and roadways, emergencies can stall the delivery of goods, leaving a community without food for a given period of time.  While the recent hurricanes and wildfires have wiped out many people's gardens, their gardening experience cannot be taken away.
 
 
Getting Started
 
-Find out what grows best in your area and when to plant for your region.
Our Planting Guide for the US is a great resource
 
-How much space do you have for growing and is it adequate for feeding your group
*I'm working on a plant spacing article so we'll update this article soon*
 
-How many plants and varieties do you need to sustain yourself and/or your group
 
-If you're newer to Growing, it might be a good idea to start with easier varieties.  Stock up on all of the food varieties that you eat but start planting the easy ones.
 
-Timing is everything!  If you're in a very HOT climate, usually summer is not the time to plant.  If you're in a cool or cold climate, it is best to plant indoors to get a jump on planting season and/or provide a greenhouse to extend your growing season.
Our Planting Guide for the US is a great resource

-Learn to Save Seeds! 
FIRST and most important: Seed Saving from your own harvest is preferred. Store bought produce can be GMO or even hybrid. Even organic store bought can be hybrid.  Hybrid seeds can be sterile and will not produce true offspring from saved seeds.
Open-pollinated, heirloom seeds will grow seeds that can be saved and re-planted year after year.

Read Seed Saving Part 1 

 
Don't Wait until it's Too Late
 
As we mentioned above, 
"No one grows a perfect garden every year so if you're planning on growing, PRACTICE is essential."
Learn to grow the foods that you eat regularly.  Canning and preserving those foods would be the next step in being more self-reliant.  You'll find that growing food takes a bit of patience and knowledge of soil, sun and water.  If you have clay soil you mid need to amend with compost.  If you have rocky soil you may need to grow in raised beds.  These are things you'll learn as you grow. 
 
We offer 3 new videos about using Compost and Manure to amend your soil and these resources are FREE!
 
 
 
 
 
SEEDS!  

Beans - Easy to grow and preserve. Beans are very high in fiber, calcium, Vitamins A, C, and K
 
Spinach -  Cold hardy and prolific. Many call this a superfood based upon its large array of vitamins such as Vitamin A, C, iron, thiamine, thiamine, and folic acid.
Potassium
 
Carrots - Another hardy crop that requires very little space. This root crop is a good source of carbohydrates, vitamin A, vitamin C
 
Squash - Both squash and pumpkin are prolific producers.  Both store well, especially winter squash. Seeds can be saved and/or roasted and consumed. Squash has lots of carbohydrates and a great nutrient list, including Vitamins A and C, as well as magnesium and potassium.
 
Allium varieties - This includes Onions, shallots, Leeks and garlic.  A good source of dietary fiber, Vitamin B6, Vitamin C, folate and potassium.
 
Beets - Easy to grow and multi-functional.  Both roots and greens are edible making beets a dual purpose crop.
 
Tomatoes - If you can keep your pest issues to a minimum, tomatoes can produce an abundance of food from a relatively small space. Tomatoes are a good source of Vitamin A, C, K, E, Potassium, thiamine, and Niacin
 
Broccoli - Another cool weather crop. Broccoli is a good source of protein, Vitamins A and K, and carbohydrates
 
Peppers - From a medicinal view, peppers such as cayenne are essential for natural remedies. Peppers are high in vitamin A and C
 
Eggplant - Not something most people would think to grow but still an important one.  Eggplant is relatively easy to grow and can grow for 3 or more years.  Bonus, it's pretty easy to save seeds from Eggplant
 
Asparagus - An essential perennial. Depending on your region, established Asparagus plants can continue to produce for 30 years (some report for longer)
 
Amaranth - Another dual purpose plant.  Amaranth is naturally drought tolerant.  Seeds from the amaranth can be used as a grain (cook just as you would quinoa).  Leaves can be picked while young and tender and eaten raw or sauteed as you would spinach. 

Radish - If you need a FAST maturing crop, radish is one of the best.  From seed to harvest, radish is mature in as few as 25 days.  Seeds are easy to save from crops and just as easy to stockpile.

Corn - I know I mention grain below but Corn deserves a specific mention.  While corn might not be the easiest crop to grow, it has many uses.  Most people automatically think of Sweet Corn.  However, Dent Corn & Field Corn are important.  Both can be dried and fed to livestock.  It can also be dried and ground into cornmeal. 
 
Grains - If you have livestock on your homestead, grains can help feed them.  Grains are a good source of carbohydrates, are high in dietary fiber and manganese


EXTRAS
 
HERBS: Natural pest control can be obtained thru companion planting with herbs. If you're planning on making your own herbal remedies, medicinal herbs are a must.

 
FLOWERS: Do not underestimate flower power!  We use many flowers planted throughout our garden for companion planting and to attract bees for pollination.  Most common flowers we use are Borage, PurpleConeflower, Marigolds, Nasturtium, Plains Coreopsis, Cornflower, Yarrow, SUNFLOWERS and Calendula

Potatoes - *Keep in mind, seed potatoes do not keep.* You must continually replentish your stock from your own crops (or Mary's Heirloom Seeds as long as we have internet). Potatoes are a staple diet of many of the world’s peoples, especially those in the west. The contain potassium, copper and B6 and are really good to ‘fill you up’ at mealtime. They are also usually pretty easy to grow, although some varieties are very disease prone. 
 
 

I hope you have enjoyed another educational article.  if you have additional questions, please leave a comment below or send an email to mary@marysheirloomseeds.com

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Marys-Heirloom-Seeds/229833070442449

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*UPDATED* October Planting Guide for the US Posted on 22 Sep 05:40 , 0 comments

We've added a few regions to our guide and a few new arrivals of Heirloom Seeds.
Happy Planting!
*Photo from The Self Sufficiant HomeAcre from our seeds*

 

Mary's Heirloom Seeds
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A Few of our Favorites!      
September 21, 2017
It seems to be cooling off in our area.
How about you?
If you're in a warmer climate like Florida, now is a GREAT time to start planting and re-planting.
Below you will find our updated
October Planting Guide as well as a few extra
If you have additional question we are happy to help!

FALL HERB GARDENS
 
With just a little early planning, you can have several herbs that like cool weather this Fall.  Fall Herb Garden suggestions include parsley (flat Italian or curled), sage, rosemary, thyme, chives, lavender, Basil, cilantro, and mint. Within a few weeks, you will be rewarded with the freshest flavors for autumn meals.
Cilantro is a great cool-weather herb!

From Seed to Harvest:

Basil - 60 to 90 days *I've harvested as early as 30 days*
Chives - 80 to 90 days
Garlic Chives - 80 to 90 days
Cilantro - 60 to 90 days *I've harvested as early as 30 days*
Lavender - 90 days
 Italian Parsley - 40 to 60 days
French Parsley - Chervil - 80 to 120 days
Peppermint - 90 days - Perennial
Rosemary - 90 days - Perennial (grows for several years) *I have seen Rosemary "trees" almost 5 feet tall
 SAGE - 90 days
Thyme - 90-180 days
 
FALL GARDEN INFO


**Just a reminder**  Organic Garlic is now available as a Pre-Order thru August 20th
Please read all of the ordering info before placing your order. Organic Garlic must be purchased in advance and we usually sell out by August/September  
 
GARLIC Planting info is separate and can be found in our article WHEN to Plant Garlic 
 

FLORIDA FIRST!
 
Arugula, Bush & Pole Beans, Beats, Broccoli, Cabbage, Carrots, Cauliflower, Collards, Corn, Cucumber, Eggplant, Endive, Kale, Kohlrabi, Lettuce, Melon, Mustard, Okra, Onions, Peas-English & Southern, PEPPERS, Pumpkin, Radish, Romaine, Sorrel, Summer Spinach (Malabar Spinach), Bloomsdale Spinach, Summer Squash, TOMATOES, Turnips and Watermelon.
 Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow 
Don't forget the HERBS &  Wildflowers!   
Arugula, Beets, Broccoli, Cabbage, Carrots, Cauliflower, Celery, Chinese Cabbage, Collards, Eggplant, Endive, Kale, Kohlrabi, Lettuce, Mustard, Onions, Peas-English & Southern Radish, Romaine, Sorrel, Summer Spinach (Malabar Spinach), Bloosmdale Spinach, Strawberry, Cherry TOMATOES and Turnips.
 Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow 
Don't forget the HERBS & Wildflowers
 
Arugula, Beets, Broccoli, Cabbage, Carrots, Cauliflower, Chinese Cabbage, Collards, Endive, Kale, Kohlrabi, Lettuce, Mustard, Onions, Radish, Romaine, Sorrel, Summer Spinach (Malabar Spinach), Bloomsdale Spinach, Strawberries and Turnips.
 Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow 
Don't forget the HERBS & Wildflowers!  

 
 
CHERRY BELLE RADISH 
 *NEW*
 
 
 
 
Arugula, Beans, Beets, Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Carrots, Cauliflower, Chard, Cilantro, Collard Greens, Cucumber, Endive, Kale, Kohlrabi, Leeks, Lettuce, Mustard greens, Onion, Pak Choy, Parsley, Peas-English & Southern, Radish, Rutabaga, Sorrel, *Malabar Spinach,* Spinach and Turnips
Herbs & Wildflowers 
Cover Crops: Alfalfa, Buckwheat, Oats and Wheat


Arugula, Basil, Beets , Broccoli, Cabbage, Carrots, Cauliflower, Cilantro, Endive, Kale, Kohlrabi, Head Lettuce, Leaf Lettuce, Onion, Peas, Radicchio, Radish, Rutabaga, Sorrel, Spinach, Swiss Chard and Turnips
HERBS: Basil, Cilantro, Dill, Fennel and Poppy

IMPORTANT: If you live in cool/colder climates but are growing in a greenhouse or use a hoop to cover your crops, you are able to grow more varieties and for a longer period. 
Read Mary's Cool Weather Crops
Arugula, Beans, Beets, Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Chinese Cabbage, Carrots, Cauliflower, Celery, Collard Greens, Eggplant, Endive, Kale, Kohlrabi, Leeks, Lettuce, Mustard Greens, Onions, Pak Choy, Parsnips, Peas, Radishes, Rutabaga, Spinach, Swiss Chard and Turnips 
 
Arugula, Calabrese Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Chinese Cabbage, Cauliflower, KALE, Kohlrabi, Leeks, Lettuce,  Bunching Onions, Radicchio, Radishes, Rutabaga, Sorrel, Spinach, Swiss Chard and  Turnips
HERBS: Basil, Cilantro, Dill, Fennel and Poppy
 

Arugula, Calabrese Sprouting Broccoli, Chinese Cabbage, Cilantro, Fennel, Kale, Kohlrabi, Lettuce, Radish, Rutabaga, Sorrel, Spinach and Swiss Chard
*Turnips if you have a later frost date*
Read about Cool Weather Crops

 
Broccoli, Cabbage, Kale, Mustard and Turnips can withstand a touch of frost and do well during Fall.
Brussels Sprouts, Kale, Parsnips, Collards and Artichokes can actually improve with a bit of frost.
 RADISH is an excellent Fall crop. 
It is easy to grow and a quick harvest!


If you have warmer days and cold nights, consider planting greens in small containers to bring inside at night.  Or, plant a windowsill garden to harvest fresh greens such as European Mesclun Mix and Arugula.
RADISH is an excellent Fall crop. 
It is easy to grow and a quick harvest!

If you have warmer days and cold nights, consider planting greens in small containers to bring inside at night.  Or, plant a windowsill garden to harvest fresh greens such as European Mesclun Mix and Arugula.
RADISH is an excellent Fall crop. 
It is easy to grow and a quick harvest! 
 

If you have warmer days and cold nights, consider planting greens in small containers to bring inside at night.  Or, plant a windowsill garden to harvest fresh greens such as European Mesclun Mix and Arugula
RADISH is an excellent Fall crop. 
It is easy to grow and a quick harvest!  


If you have warmer days and cold nights, consider planting greens in small containers to bring inside at night.  Or, plant a windowsill garden to harvest fresh greens such as European Mesclun Mix and Arugula
  RADISH is an excellent Fall crop. 
It is easy to grow and a quick harvest!  
 

Broccoli, Cabbage, Kale, Mustard and Turnips can withstand a touch of frost and do well during Fall.
Brussels Sprouts, Kale, Parsnips, Collards and Artichokes can actually improve with a bit of frost.
 RADISH is an excellent Fall crop.  It is easy to grow and a quick harvest! 

Vates Blue Curled Kale


Arugula, Basil, Beets , Broccoli, Cabbage, Carrots, Cauliflower, Cilantro, Endive, Kale, Kohlrabi, Head Lettuce, Leaf Lettuce, Onion, Peas, Radicchio, Radish, Rutabaga,  Sorrel, Spinach, Swiss Chard and Turnips
HERBS: Basil, Cilantro, Dill, Fennel and Poppy 


HELPFUL LINKS  
Wondering when to plant ORGANIC GARLIC?
 
   
If you have additional questions please feel free to ask. 

Have a safe and happy weekend!

 

Happy Planting,

 

Mary's Heirloom Seeds, P. O. Box 3763, Ramona, CA 92065

 


SEED SAVING Series Part 1 Posted on 09 Sep 07:08 , 0 comments

Saving seeds from your garden bounty is like putting money away for a rainy day. Best of all, saving your own seeds is one of many ways to regain control of your family’s source of food.

FIRST and most important: Seed Saving from your own harvest is preferred. Store bought produce can be GMO or even hybrid. Even organic store bought can be hybrid.  Hybrid seeds can be sterile and will not produce true offspring from saved seeds.


Open-pollinated, heirloom seeds will grow seeds that can be saved and re-planted year after year.
 

SECOND: Cross pollination is always a possibility if you grow multiple varieties of the same crop. Tomatoes for example.  You can avoid cross-pollination by creating barriers of plants and distance or planting only 1 variety to save seeds from each season.
 

Regardless of plant type, one rule is universal: The seed must ripen on the plant in order to ensure best rate of germination. This means your peppers must turn red, orange or yellow (whichever color when fully ripe), your eggplants and cucumbers need to turn yellow, your beans and peas must be “rattle dry” in their pods, and your corn must be left on the stalks until the husks turn paper-brown. Pumpkins, watermelons and melons must be vine-ripe; keep them a few weeks longer in a dry place until they are almost rotten.
 


PICTURED is a very over-ripe Cocozelle Zucchini. You'll see that the skin started to yellow (and harden). Once you have saved seed, clean it and allow it to dry thoroughly. Seed that is not absolutely dry when stored will develop mold, which will kill it.

Dry seed should be put away in airtight containers in a dark, cool place until needed—always date the container. Some seeds will keep for many years


Below is our VIDEO about pollination and cross-pollination





http://www.facebook.com/pages/Marys-Heirloom-Seeds/229833070442449

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NEW Arrivals & FREE Seeds Posted on 07 Sep 06:14 , 0 comments

If you're reading this article, we have a Special Offer for YOU!
We're going to include 2 FREE Seed packs with your purchase thru the month of September.
At checkout, mention "FREE BASIL" in the special instructions box at checkout.  We'll include a free pack of Lemon Basil AND a Free Pack of our Save the Bees flower mix!

Heirloom Radish is a wonderful Fall crop

Mary's Heirloom Seeds
Quick Links
Join Our List
A Few of our Favorites!      
September 6, 2017

We're ready to start planting our Fall crops!
In case you'd like to get a jump start, below you'll find our
Fall HERB garden suggestions.
is also available on our website

If you have additional question we are happy to help!

FREE SEEDS
As promised, we are including a FREE pack of Save The Bees wildflower mix with every single purchase of $10 or more at  
Mary's Heirloom Seeds.
 



We still have quite a few 99 Cent seed packs as well.  If you're wondering what to plant, check out our September Planting Guide for the US 


FALL GARDEN INFO


NEW ARRIVALS 

 
30 days.  Long tapered deep red roots that are 6-7" long.
Long Scarlet has crisp, tender white flesh, medium tops, for bunching.


 
 
70 days.  Michihili cabbage produces a tall, cylindrical, leafy head of 17" long and 6" across. 
Light green leaves are very tender and delicious, excellent for stir-fry and pickling. 
Michihili Chinese Cabbage grows best in mild climates.  


 

65 days.  An early bush cocozelle zucchini that produces huge yields of 16" fruit.  
Much better eaten at the 6-8" size.  Light green skin with white stripes. Very flavorful creamy-white flesh. 
Very vigorous and can produce as many as 30 zucchini per bush.


BACK IN STOCK

105 days  Large, pink, banana-shaped fruit can weigh 10-40 lbs. This variety is over 100 years old. Fine flavored, dry, sweet, orange flesh that is superbly fine tasting.  Popular on the West Coast. Excellent for homemade Squash Pie!


 
55 days.  The watermelon radish has ball-shaped root that is about 4 inches in diameter. 
The color starts with deep green shoulders that fade to a bright white skin.Cut a watermelon radish open and discover a bright red flesh that is reminiscent of a summertime watermelon!
Watermelon radish is crispy with mild and sweet flavor, excellent for salad, garnish and even cooking in Asian dishes.
Watermelon radish is an heirloom Chinese daikon radish and botanically a member of the Brassica (mustard) family. Like most radishes the Watermelon radish contains isothiocyanate, a pungent chemical compound that when isolated makes an organic, natural pest repellent.



60 days.  This dark-green bean has been a favorite for over 40 years.  Heavy yield.  Matures its large crop early and all at once.  Stagger planting for longer harvesting.


HELPFUL LINKS  
Wondering when to plant ORGANIC GARLIC?
 
   
FALL HERB GARDENS
 
With just a little early planning, you can have several herbs that like cool weather this Fall.  Fall Herb Garden suggestions include parsley (flat Italian or curled), sage, rosemary, thyme, chives, lavender, Basil, cilantro, and mint. Within a few weeks, you will be rewarded with the freshest flavors for autumn meals.
Cilantro is a great cool-weather herb!

From Seed to Harvest:

Basil - 60 to 90 days *I've harvested as early as 30 days*
Chives - 80 to 90 days
Garlic Chives - 80 to 90 days
Cilantro - 60 to 90 days *I've harvested as early as 30 days*
Lavender - 90 days
 Italian Parsley - 40 to 60 days
French Parsley - Chervil - 80 to 120 days
Peppermint - 90 days - Perennial
Rosemary - 90 days - Perennial (grows for several years) *I have seen Rosemary "trees" almost 5 feet tall
 SAGE - 90 days
Thyme - 90-180 days
 
If you have additional questions please feel free to ask. 

Have a safe and happy weekend!

 

Happy Planting,

 

Mary's Heirloom Seeds, P. O. Box 3763, Ramona, CA 92065