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START A VICTORY GARDEN Posted on 2 Jun 14:42 , 0 comments

Victory Gardens are making a comeback with an emphasis on sustainable food. Starting a garden is always a great idea so we have a few tips below.

During World War I, Victory Gardens began in backyards, empty lots and whatever space people could find as Americans were called to grow food. Food production had fallen dramatically as agricultural labor joined the military service.

During World War II, the victory garden movement resurfaced. Eleanor Roosevelt planted a victory garden on the White House lawn and Americans were encouraged to “Sow the Seeds of Victory.”

At its peak, it is estimated that nearly 20,000,000 gardens were grown and about 40 percent of all vegetables produced in the U.S. came from Victory Gardens.

 

Getting started

In my article You Don't need a Farm to Grow Food, I mentioned several ways to grow including growing vertically, in buckets or growing in small spaces.

Growing from seeds allows you to choose unique varieties and grow them according to your area.  Choosing heirloom seeds will give the opportunity to save seeds from your harvest to grow more food in the future.  Growing from seed and then saving seeds is like printing your own money (only better because you can't eat money)

If this is your first time growing a garden, you might consider easier varieties to grow from seed.  EASY CROPS to grow that do not require much space or heavy nutrients include

Beans (50-90 days)

Beets (50-60 days)

Radish (25-35 days)

Basil (30-60 days)

Dill (30-60 days)

Cilantro (20-60 days)

Swiss Chard (60 days)

Lettuce (20-60 days)

Spinach (50-60 days)

Turnips (50-60 days)

If you intend to grow enough to preserve for future consumption, don't overlook varieties such as Tomatoes, Cucumber, Dill, Okra, Peppers, Squash, Rosemary and Pumpkin

 

Know What to Plant and When to plant

For a successful garden it is important to know when to plant certain crops specifically in your area. Planting in Florida for example will be much different than Colorado.

Our Comprehensive Planting Guide includes 2 fantastic options.  One is a Region-Specific Guide and the other is a USDA Zone Specific Planting Guide.

Our Comprehensive Planting Guide also includes seed-specific planting information, DIY garden tutorials, helpful videos and even a few recipes

Depending on your region, you might even be able to grow year round!

 

A few Cool weather crops include:

Peas, carrots, cauliflower, broccoli, radish, kohlrabi, radish, cabbage, chard, lettuce, spinach, beets, turnips, leeks

Heat tolerant crops include:

Okra, Sweet & Hot peppers, Eggplant, Cucumber (specifically Ashley Cucumber), Corn, Tomatoes and Tomaatillos, Summer Squash, Pumpkins, Winter Squash, Melons, Southern Peas (also called crowder peas) and Watermelon

 

Don't forget to plant flowers to attract pollinators!

 

Pick the Right Location

Choose a sunny spot for sun-loving crops

Choose a spot with good drainage

Avoid high-traffic areas so your plants can thrive

 

Mary's Tips

Use Companion Planting with your are planning & planting your garden.  This is a great way to deter some pests and attract pollinators to your garden.

Succession planting can lets you harvest a crop over a longer period, which prevents waste and lengthens your harvest time.

Know which plants are "heavy feeders" and keep them well fed for a healthy harvest.

Most important, have fun!  Growing food is amazing!

Plant those seeds!  Grow more Food! 
Plant a Victory Garden today!

 

If you have specific garden or seed related questions, please contact us via email at MARY@MARYSHEIRLOOMSEEDS.COM
Happy Planting!


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Mary's Comprehensive Planting Guide Posted on 5 Feb 18:57 , 0 comments

Welcome to Mary's Heirloom Seeds!
 
As promised, we have our most comprehensive planting guide ever! This is a great guide to help you plan your garden. 


Each of the zones list below are links to the full planting guide. Click the text or the image to see the planting guide


FLORIDA









 

ZONE 1


From our Mary's 2018 Planting Guide for the US, we have a regions-specific guide

 
 

 

Now that we've covered our zone & region specific planting guides, below you will find additional planting info such as plant spacing and growing tutorials.


PLANT SPACING

Plant Spacing Chart for Veggies

Square Foot Garden Plant Spacing Chart



RAISED BED GARDENING

Build Your Own Raised Beds & GROW

Soil Recipes for Raised Bed Gardens

DIY Potting Soil Mix

VIDEO: Picking Out Lumber for Raised Beds

VIDEO: Building a Raised Bed

VIDEO: Filling Up a raised Bed & Placement




CONTAINER GARDENING

Start A Bucket Garden

Growing In Containers

VIDEO: Create a Bucket Garden

VIDEO: Transplanting Seedlings into our Bucket Garden

VIDEO: Planting Garlic in Containers

VIDEO: How to make a Planter from a Food Grade Barrel

VIDEO: Planting in a Food Grade Barrel



SEED STARTING

VIDEO: SEED GERMINATION

VIDEO: Seed Starting Made Simple

VIDEO: Seed Starting with Coconut Coir Pellets

Seed Germination

Tips for Seed Starting

Seed Starting with Coconut Coir Pellets

Using Coconut Coir in the Garden

VIDEO: Using Coconut Coir in the Garden



GROWING FOOD

Video: Grow More Tomatoes

Best Veggies for Homestead Gardens

Feeding a Family from the Garden
(how much to plant)

Perennial Veggies & Herbs Info

About Orach (purple)

Grow Your Own Salsa Garden with Recipe

VIDEO: Heat Tolerant Lettuce

VIDEO: TOP 10 HOMESTEAD CROPS

 

 

VIDEO: Yellow Scotch Bonnet Tasting & Seed Saving



TRANSPLANTING SEEDLINGS

Hardening Off Seedlings

VIDEO: Transplanting Seedlings



GROWING LUFFA FROM SEED TO HARVEST

VIDEO: Growing Luffa Update

VIDEO: Luffa Garden Update #2

VIDEO: HARVESTING LUFFA

 

FEEDING YOUR PLANTS

Feeding Your Plants-Updated

DIY Fertilizer Mix for a Liquid Feed

Using Azomite in the Garden for Healthy Plants

VIDEO: DIY Organic Liquid Fertilizer

Using Calcium in the Garden

DIY Alfalfa Meal Tea

VIDEO: DIY Alfalfa Meal Tea

Kelp Meal Tea Recipe

VIDEO: Using Azomite in the Garden

 

 

DIY IDEAS FOR THE GARDEN

Using Coffee Grounds in the Garden

VIDEO: DIY Tomato Cages
DIY Tomato Cages Tutorial


GROWING ON A BUDGET VIDEOS

Growing on a Budget
Composting
Get the Scoop on Using Poop
Using Horse Manure
Using Goat Manure
Seed Starting Indoors
Recycled Containers for Seed Starting

 

 

MORE VIDEOS:

SEEDS ARE AMAZING

HEIRLOOM CORN VARIETIES

HEIRLOOM SQUASH WITH MARY

GLASS GEM CORN

HARVESTING HEIRLOOM CORN & TIPS FOR GROWING CORN

MAKING POPCORN with Homegrown Glass Gem Corn

 

PEST CONTROL

Companion Planting

VIDEO: Companion Planting with Borage

Pest Control & Prevention in the Garden

Identifying Common Garden Pests

Identifying Common "Good Bugs"

Organic Pest Control part 1

Organic Pest Control part 2

Organic Pest Control part 3

Using Organic Neem Oil in the Garden

VIDEO: Using Food Grade DE in the Garden


GARLIC

When to Plant Garlic

How to Plant Organic Garlic

Harvesting & Curing Organic Garlic


POTATOES

VIDEO: Chitting Seed Potaotes

Planting & Growing Organic Potatoes

When to Plant Potatoes: A State-Specific Guide


SEED SAVING

Seed Saving Part 1
Saving & Storing Garden Seeds for Next Season


SEED SAVING VIDEOS

Seed Saving Glass Gem Corn Seeds

Harvesting Calendula Seeds

Harvesting Sunflowers

Seed Saving Intro
Harvesting Squash Seeds
Harvesting Okra Seeds
Harvesting Swiss Chard Seeds

RECIPE
VIDEO: Stuffed Scallop Squash

VIDEO: BASIL LEMONADE

BAKED ACORN SQUASH

TOMATILLO VERDE SALSA

 

We will update this list as we add to our youtube channel and articles posted here on our website. If you have specific garden or seed related questions, please contact us via email at MARY@MARYSHEIRLOOMSEEDS.COM



Happy Planting!


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Top 10 Homestead Crops Posted on 4 Dec 13:26 , 21 comments

I am often asked about my favorite crops to grow so I thought I'd share.  This is the print version from my video Top 10 Homestead Crops

Choosing my favorites is no easy task but I've included a few specific varieties throughout this article that might help you choose.  If you have additional questions I'm happy to help!

 

  1. Cabbage, Collards and Kale

Cold hardiness and nutrient-rich qualities are why cabbage makes this list. It can stay in the garden late into fall and store in a root cellar or cold greenhouse. Sauerkraut, a fermented food rich in vitamins and probiotics, is a traditional means of preserving cabbage, and your kraut can keep in a crock for months.

Pictured is Pak Choy Cabbage (also called bok choy and pok choy).  This is a fantastic, fast-growing variety of Chinese cabbage.

Kale is a superfood that keeps on giving!  When growing Kale, you harvest the outer leaves instead of pulling up the whole plant.  This allows for multiple harvests of nutrient-dense food.

Lacinato Kale is a good heat-tolerant variety if you live in warmer climates

Collards are cool weather crops but some do very well in warmer climates.  Morris Heading and Georgia Green both do well in warmer growing areas.

Greens don't last very long once harvested so you'll need to use them up or preserve them. 2 simple ways to preserve greens are freezing and dehydrating.

 

  1. Winter Squash

 

 

 

 

Winter squash, rich in fiber and vitamins A and C.  Grow ‘Waltham Butternut’ for a pest-resistant, HUGE performer in the garden. Pumpkin and Acorn squash are also homestead favorites and they store very well.

HUBBARB BLUE reaches 16 to 20 pounds.  It is also a "trap crop" for companion planting so Hubbard Blue is a must-have in our garden

If stored properly, winter squash and pumpkin can last a few months after harvest making this an excellent homestead crop.

 

  1. Staples Crops: Dry Beans & Green Beans

Beans are most definitely a homestead favorite.  From our article Feeding a Family from the garden, it is recommended to plant 10-20 plants per person to feed for a year. If you're just looking to add to your food preps, 5 plants or more per person would work

Dry beans, or legumes, are a homestead favorite as they store very well without needed to can them.

Green Beans are easy to grow and can or freeze.  If you have a smaller garden space, planting pole beans are an excellent option as they grow UP. 

 

  1. Heirloom Corn

Providing homegrown food for your table is such an amazing thing.  Heirloom Corn can be used fresh or dried for future use.  Animals can be fed from stored corn making Heirloom Corn one of our top 10.

As we mentioned in our video Heirloom Corn varieties at Mary's Heirloom Seeds, there are 6  types of corn: Sweet, Popcorn, flint, flour, dent and waxy.

Flint corn is suited to cooler, wetter climates and is the most difficult to grind.

Flour corn, grown by American Indians in the Southwest, is the easiest to grind.

Dent corn is characterized by the dent in the top of each kernel.

Common field corn is dent corn.

Popcorn is exactly as the name implies.  It is used dried for popping.

Sweet corn does not store as well so it should be consumed or preserved after harvest.

 

  1. ROOT CROPS: Garlic & Potatoes

I know I mention a few different root crops for homesteading but Garlic and Potatoes are in a category together as they store very well if properly cured.  "Seed potatoes" and "seed garlic" is available from most seed companies only seasonally.  You can use store bought but you might be exposing your garden to soil born diseases.

We have 2 videos about garlic planting:

PLANTING GARLIC

PLANTING GARLIC IN CONTAINERS

 

  1. TOMATOES

Tomatoes can be dried, frozen or canned.  They can be made into soups, sauces, pastes and more. They then become the base ingredient in hundreds of kitchen recipes.  Tomatoes are one of the easiest veggies to can because they are a high acid veggie and as such, they can be water bath canned instead of needing a pressure canner.

Yellow Pear tomato is a sweet and juicy snack I like to eat right out in the garden.  San Marzano tomato has been a hearty producer for making sauce. Cherokee Purple Tomato is still my all time favorite for slicers but Emerald Green is a close second!

 

  1. RADISH

Fast growing, fast maturing and a double duty crop because you eat the root and greens.  Easy to pickle and delicious raw.  Radish can also be roasted just like mini potatoes.  French Breakfast Radish is a more mild variety.  German Giant Radish can be eaten small or large.  Japanese Daikon is a nice, spicy variety but it takes a couple weeks longer to mature.

 

  1. BEETS

Fast growing, fast maturing and a double duty crop because you eat the root and greens of beets.  Depending on your growing region, some gardeners can grow beets year-round.

Detroit Dark Red is definitely a favorite because it's so pest resistant. Red Mammoth Mangel deserves a mention because it can grow 20 POUNDS, making it great to feed livestock

 

  1. Wheat for those of you not gluten sensitive. Wheat is used to make so many food items such as bread, pasta and pastries.

We carry Einkorn Wheat berries, which is an ancient grain.  Some people with gluten sensitivity have had success using Einkorn instead.

BUT...I would say SUNFLOWERS instead on our homestead.  We avoid wheat.  Sunflowers produce seeds to feed us and our chickens.  They also produce A LOT of seeds to grow more.  Sunflowers also attract pollinators to our garden to help us grow the BEST garden ever!

 

  1. HERBS

Pretty much grow your own pharmacy if you know what to grow and how to dry it.  We offer a few seed combo packs like the "In the Kitchen" Herb Garden Kit to help you grow a small herb garden.  For your own home apothecary, we have quite a few options.  CLICK HERE to see our herb seed combo packs

 

If I had to pick 3 specific varieties to grow?

TOP 3 Varieties:

Blue Lake Bush Beans, Hubbard Blue Squash and Cherokee Purple Tomato


If you have additional questions please give us a call or email
MARY@MARYSHEIRLOOMSEEDS.COM 

Happy Planting!


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JULY Planting Guide for the US *Updated* Posted on 5 Jul 13:32 , 1 comment

Are you ready for planting info?

Mary's Heirloom Seeds
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HELPFUL LINKS 
July 3, 2019
Last weekend we discussed seed viability, seed storage and more on our fb live
and it got me thinking about our gardens.
Now more than ever, growing food has become a necessity and even and act of defiance.
(Some cities are banning or trying to ban front yard gardens)
WE GROW and encourage others to do the same.
If you have questions, please ask!
To help you grow, especially if you're on a budget, we have our
Let's get planting!

 
 
 
 We're planning our FALL gardens as well.
Stay tuned for more planting info
SEED GARLIC might be available for pre-orders  
as early as this weekend.   
If you are interested, please let us know so we can put you on our waiting list 
GARLIC is usually planted from late September thru December depending on your area
 
 
 
  
Arugula, Bush & Pole Beans, Lima Beans, Beets, Brussels Sprouts, Carrots, Cauliflower, Celery, Sweet Corn, Endive, Pie Pumpkins, Radish, Radicchio, Summer Squash and Tomatoes
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY  Herb!! Don't forget the  Wildflowers!
  

 
Sow Indoors: Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Celery, Pumpkin, Summer Squash, Winter Squash and Tomatoes
Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Beans, Cantaloupe, Sweet Corn, Cucumber, Melons, Mustard Greens, Southern Peas, Pumpkin, Summer Squash and Winter Squash
Transplant: Melons, Peppers, Pumpkin,  Summer Squash, Winter Squash and Tomatoes

Pretty much EVERY  Herb!! Don't forget the  Wildflowers!
 
 
Arugula, Beans, Beets Corn, Cucumber, Lettuce, Melons, Mustard Greens, Okra, Peas, Peppers, Pumpkin, Radish, Radicchio, Summer Squash, Swiss Chard and Tomatoes 
Don't forget the  Wildflowers!  
  

Sow Indoors: Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage
and Cauliflower
Sow Outdoors: Beans, Carrots, Collards, Cucumber, Okra, Peas, Pumpkin, Rutabaga and Winter Squash
Transplant: Eggplant, Peppers and Tomatoes
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY  Herb!!
Don't forget the  Wildflowers
 
 

Sow Indoors: Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Celery, Kale, Leeks and Lettuce
Sow Outdoors: Bean, Beets, Carrots, Chard,
Collards, Cucumber, Kale, Kohlrabi, Mustard Greens,
Okra, Peas, Radish, Rutabaga, Summer Squash,
Winter Squash and Turnips
  
 
Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Beets, Carrots, Kale, Lettuce, Mustard Greens, Radicchio, Radish, Rutabaga, Scallions, Sorrel, Spinach and Turnips
Transplant: Broccoli, Cabbage and Cauliflower
  
 

Sow Indoors: Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Kale, Kohlrabi and Lettuce
Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Beans, Beets, Carrots, CHARD, Collards, Cucumber, Endive, Kale, Leeks, Peas, Pumpkins, Radish, Rutabaga, Summer Squash, Winter Squash and Turnips
Transplant: Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Kale, Leeks, Lettuce and Turnips
Our Favorite Herbs:  Basil, Borage, Catnip, Chives, Cilantro, Dill, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Parsley    


Sow Indoors: Broccoli, Cabbage, Celery, Kale, Kohlrabi, Leeks and Lettuce
Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Beans, Beets, Carrots, CHARD, Endive, Kale, Lettuce, Mustard Greens, Radish, Rutabaga, Scallions and Turnip
Transplant: Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Celery, Endive, Kale, Leek, Lettuce,
 
 
  
 
(Depending on your climate) 
Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Beans, Carrots, Corn, Cucumbers, Eggplant, Lettuce, Melons, Mustard Greens, Onions, Radish, Rutabaga, Summer Squash, Peppers, Tomatoes and Turnips
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY  Herb!!!
Don't forget the  Wildflowers!  
 
 
Sow Indoors: Eggplant, Peppers and Tomatoes
Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Beans, Corn, Okra, Peas, Pumpkin, Winter Squash and Watermelon
Transplant: Peppers and Tomatoes
  
Don't forget HERBS and WILDFLOWERS!
   
 
 
Purple Plum Radish 

 
Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Beans, Beets, Broccoli, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Cucumber, Lettuce, Peas, Radish, Rutabaga, Spinach, Squash, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes and Turnips    
 
Don't forget the Herbs and Wildflowers!  
 

Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Basil, Beans, Beets, Cabbage (early), Carrots, Chard, Cilantro, Collards, Fennel, Lettuce, Radish, Spinach, Squash (summer) and Turnips


Sow indoors or outdoors: Lettuce, Radish, Spinach, Swiss Chard and Cherry Tomato.   
There's still time to Plant Herbs and Wildflowers   
 
     
Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Basil, Beans, Beets, Cabbage (early), Carrots, Chard, Cilantro, Collards, Fennel, Lettuce, Peas, Radish, Spinach, Squash (summer) and Turnips 
 
 
   
 
 
VIDEOS
 

 



Transplanting Seedlings into Containers for our Bucket Garden
Transplanting Seedlings into Containers for our Bucket Garden



Harvesting Sunflower Seeds
If you have additional questions please feel free to ask. 

 

Happy Planting,

 

Mary's Heirloom Seeds, P. O. Box 3763, Ramona, CA 92065

Seed Starting Basics Posted on 13 Feb 17:12 , 0 comments

We offer several articles with our own tips & tricks to seed starting but this one is a bit more in-depth.  We start planning and prepping for seed starting when it's still chilly outside.

LUFFA SEEDLING


I like to use Coconut Coir for seed starting.  It's easy to use and less acidic than peat moss.  Seeds do not need any fertilizer in the beginning stages so it is best not to use compost or treated soil for seed germination.



I highly recommend our article Seed Starting with Coconut Coir Pellets

We also have a video




Coconut Coir Pellets or 6 Cell Germination trays work well for seed starting.  Use garden markers to label the seeds you've planted.  I hear from SO many gardeners that they forgot to label or lost their labels and they don't know what they planted!

We recently posted 2 video to help you get started






Sowing depth varies, depending on the germination needs of the plant, but generally most seeds are sown at a depth about twice their width. Some seeds require light to germinate and so require sowing on the soil surface. Once depth is determined, sow one to two seeds per pot and mist the soil surface with water so it's evenly moist.
 

Most seeds germinate best at temperatures between 65 and 75 degrees Fahrenheit.  Watering when the soil surface feels dry is sufficient, but empty any collected water from the drip tray within 30 minutes of irrigation to prevent soggy soil.


VELVET BEANS

 

Some seedlings may have to be transplanted into larger pots to give them room to grow and develop their root systems. Handle the baby plants gently by their leaves, not stems or roots, and try to keep the tiny rootballs intact as you move plants to their new pots.

When watering seeds, I use either a spray bottle to moisten the soil or pour water into the reservoir so the soil wicks up the water.  Heavy-handed pouring can displace tiny seeds so it is best to use caution.

Kathryn at Little Bits of Heaven homestead mentioned her secret to avoid "dampening off" in her video Starting the Summer Garden & Cheap Seed Organization and it's cinnamon!  We use Cinnamon as well and it definitely helps.

Check on your plants once a day

Harden off your seedlings prior to transplanting outdoors.  Not sure how, we have an article  Hardening Off Seedlings

If you'd like to check out our very first video on seed starting, it's also on our youtube channel

If you have additional questions please give us a call or email
MARY@MARYSHEIRLOOMSEEDS.COM 

Happy Planting!


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About Perpetual Spinach Posted on 15 Oct 07:57 , 2 comments

If you're like me and you're looking to add a few more varieties to your garden that will produce for more than a season, Perpetual Spinach is a fantastic option!

Perpetual spinach is actually a swiss chard variety but looks and tastes more like spinach.

From seed, Perpetual Spinach is usually producing by 50 days.  I've had quite a few swiss chard varieties continue to produce for over 9 months so they're well worth the moderate amount of space they use in the garden.  Perpetual Spinach is a great container variety as well.

From Mary's Heirloom Seeds

50 days. European heirloom dating back to the 1860s. Belongs to the same species as chard and beets, but it has distinctive differences.

The taste is more like a true spinach than ordinary chard, and the leaves look like spinach too.  Pertetual Spinach leaves are flatter and more pointed than chard, with slimmer stems.

An excellent no-fuss warm weather substitute for spinach in the Southeast.

 

From Mary's Blog, Growing Swiss Chard from Seed to Harvest

Tip: Soak seeds overnight in water before planting to ensure strong germination.

Plant seeds 1/4 - 1/2 inch deep and 3-6 inches apart. Set out seedlings 8-12 inches apart. Indoors or out, thin newly germinated seedlings with cuticle scissors instead of pulling them out. Chard seed capsules often contain two or more seeds. If more than one germinates snip off all but the strongest sprout at the soil line. Gradually thin direct-sown seedlings to 8-12 inches apart.

Harvest individual leaves from the outer area but be sure to leave the crown intact.

Frequent picking helps to stimulate the production of new leaves. Rinse leaves with cool water immediately, shake off the excess moisture, and store in plastic bags in the refrigerator for up to four days.

Swiss Chard is not only heat tolerant, depending on your area, it is also a cool weather crop.  I have had several varieties withstand several days of frost and survive. 

Companion Plants for Swiss Chard:

Bean, cabbage family, tomato, onion and roses. Don't overlook chard's value as an ornamental plant in flower beds or wherever you have room for it. Don't grow chard near cucurbits, melons, corn or herbs.

CONTINUE READING

 

 

 

 

If you have additional questions please send an email to mary@marysheirloomseeds.com


Happy Planting!


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Growing Lettuce from Seed to Harvest Posted on 29 Aug 09:02 , 0 comments

I've written quite a few articles about food prices and growing your own food. 

First, I wrote Food Prices are on the Rise , then I wrote In Times of Uncertainty, Grow & Save and a follow-up Food Prices Continue to Rise.  These articles explain why it is so important to start growing your own food.  Even if it's just a salad garden, there is something for everyone.  So let's get started on started on growing Lettuce! 

Lettuce and Spinach:

Plant seeds 1/4 inch deep in moist soil.  It is best to sow lettuce or spinach seeds thinly in rows spaced about 1 ft. apart or simply scatter the seeds in blocks. Cover lightly with soil, firm in place and water well. Keep the soil moist until germination. Once the plants have a grown their true leaves, you can begin to thin the plants to about 6" apart.


Start lettuce or spinach indoors or direct seeded in the garden as soon as the soil is workable.  Great for container gardens.

Depending on the type of lettuce, harvest outer leaves only or cut down the whole head.  Succession planting can dramatically increase yields, especially in smaller areas.  Succession planting is when you stagger plantings in the same area throughout the season. Each time a crop is finished you pull it and plant a new one.

 

Lettuce and spinach are great options for cold frames if you're growing in a cooler climate.  Fertilize 3 weeks after transplanting. Lettuce prefers soil that is high in humus, with plenty of compost and a steady supply of nitrogen to keep if growing fast. Alfalfa Meal or Alfalfa Meal Tea works well for Growing Greens.

 

Spinach can be harvested in the cut and come again method of harvesting lettuce. Cut individual leaves, starting with the older, outer leaves, and letting the young inner leaves remain and continue growing for a later harvest. You can also cut down the whole plant, for a larger harvest.

Companion Plants for GREENS

Lettuce: Does well with beets, broccoli, bush beans, pole beans, carrots, cucumbers, onion, radish and strawberries. It grows happily in the shade under young sunflowers. Dill and lettuce are a perfect pair. Keep lettuce away from cabbage. Cabbage is a deterrent to the growth and flavor of lettuce.

Spinach: Plant with peas and beans as they provide natural shade for the spinach. Gets along with cabbage, cauliflower, celery, eggplant, onion, peas, strawberries and fava bean. Plant spinach with squash. It's a good use of space because by the time squash plants start to get big the spinach is ready to bolt. 

 

TIPS for growing GREENS

-Make sure soil remains moist but is well drained.

- You should be able to sow additional seeds every two weeks for a continuous harvest throughout the growing season

- Consider planting rows of chives or garlic between your lettuce to control aphids. They act as “barrier plants” for the lettuce

-Lettuce will tell you when it needs water. Just look at it. If the leaves are wilting, sprinkle them anytime—even in the heat of the day—to cool them off and slow down the transpiration rate.

-Weed by hand if necessary, but be careful of plant roots: They are shallow.

 

 

 If you have additional questions please send an email to mary@marysheirloomseeds.com


Happy Planting!


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AUGUST Planting Guide for the US 2018 Posted on 11 Aug 07:57 , 1 comment

We're planning & Planting our FALL gardens!

 

Don't miss out on our 99 Cent Seed Packs.
These seeds are a great deal!

GARLIC is now available for pre-orders.
GARLIC is planted from late September thru December depending on your area.


Arugula, Bush & Pole Beans, Broccoli, Cabbage, Chinese Cabbage, Cauliflower, Celery, Collards, Eggplant, Endive, Lettuce, Mustard Greens, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Sorrel, Spinach and Turnips
Herbs: Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Thyme and Yarrow
Don't forget the  Wildflowers!
 
 
Sow Indoors - Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Chinese Cabbage, Swiss Chard, Leek, Lettuce, Mustard, Onion and Spinach
Sow Outside - Arugula, Bush & Pole Beans, Beets, Carrots, Chinese Cabbage, Collards, Corn, Cucumber, Kale, Kohlrabi, Lettuce, Mustard Greens, Onions, Peas- Snow & Snap, Radish, Rutabaga, Sorrel, Spinach, Swiss Chard and Turnips
Transplant - Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Celery, Kale, Kohlrabi, Lettuce, Summer Squash, Swiss Chard and Tomatoes
Don't forget the Herbs and  Wildflowers!
 
 
 
Sow Outside - Arugula, Beets, Carrots, Chard, Cilantro, Collard Greens, Kale, Lettuce, Mustard Greens, Radish, Rutabaga, Sorrel, Spinach and Turnips
Transplant - Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Kale 

Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Beans, Beets, Carrots, Chard, Collards, Cucumber, Kale, Kohlrabi, Lettuce, Mustard Greens, Radishes, Rutabaga, Spinach, Squash and Turnips.
Sow Indoors: Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Chard, Kale, Kohlrabi and Lettuce.
Herbs: Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
 
 

Sow Outside - Arugula, Beet, Carrot, Chard, Collards, Endive, Kale Kohlrabi, Lettuce, Mustard Greens, Peas, Radish, Rutabaga, Sorrel, Spinach and Turnips
Transplant - Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Celery, Chard, Kale, Kohlrabi, Lettuce and Spinach
Don't forget the Herbs  and  Wildflowers
  
 
Sow Outside - Arugula, Beets, Kale, Kohlrabi, Lettuce, Radish, Rutabaga, Spinach and Turnips
Transplant - Kale, Kohlrabi and Scallions
 
 

Sow Outdoors - Arugula, Beets, Calabrese Broccoli, Carrots, Chard, Collards, Endive, Kale, Kohlrabi, Lettuce, Mustard Greens, Radish, Rutabaga, Sorrel, Spinach and Turnips.
Transplant- Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Kale, Kohlrabi, Lettuce and Parsley
Our Favorite Herbs:  Basil, Borage, Catnip, Chives, Cilantro, Dill, Lavender, Lemon Bee Balm and Parsley
Don't forget the  Wildflowers!
 


Sow Outdoors - Arugula, Beets, Calabrese Broccoli, Carrots, Endive, Kohlrabi, Lettuce, Mustard Greens, Radish, Rutabaga, Spinach and Turnip
Transplant - Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Celery, Endive, Kale, Kohlrabi, Leeks and Lettuce
 
  
 
(Depending on your climate) 
Sow Outdoors - Arugula, Beans, Cabbage, Carrots, Corn, Cucumbers, Eggplant, Lettuce, Melons, Onions, Radish, Summer Spinach (Malabar), Squash, Peppers, Tomatoes and Zucchini.
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY  Herb!!!
Don't forget the  Wildflowers!
 
 
Sow Indoor - Broccoli, Cabbage Cauliflower, Eggplant, Leeks and Lettuce
Sow Outside - Arugula, Beans, Collards, Corn, Cucumber, Mustard Greens, Okra, Southern Peas, Peppers, Pumpkin, Sorrel, Summer Spinach (Malabar Spinach), Summer Squash, Winter Squash, Cherry Tomato and Watermelon
Pretty much EVERY  Herb!!! 
Our favorites: Basil, Cilantro and Parsley
Don't forget  WILDFLOWERS!


If you have warmer days and cold nights, consider planting greens in small containers to bring inside at night.  Or, plant an indoor windowsill garden to harvest fresh greens such as European Mesclun Mix and Arugula
RADISH is an excellent Fall crop.  It is easy to grow and a quick harvest!   
 

Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Broccoli raab, Cabbage, Chinese Cabbage (pak choy), Cauliflower, Chard, Cilantro, Collards, Kale, Lettuce, Mustard greens, Radish, Salad greens, Spinach and Turnips


Arugula, Chinese Cabbage, Lettuce, Radish, Spinach and Swiss Chard
Plant Herbs and Wildflowers
  
 
     
Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Beets, Broccoli raab, Cabbage (early), Chinese Cabbage (pak choy), Cauliflower, Chard, Cilantro, Collards, Kale, Lettuce, Mustard greens, Peas, Radish, Salad greens, Spinach and Turnips 


 
Arugula , Eggplant, Escarole, Mustard, Onions, Okra, Peppers, Sweet Potatoes, Pumpkin, Radish, Summer Spinach (Malabar Spinach), Summer Squash & Winter Squash, Tomatoes
 Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Don't forget the  Wildflowers!  
 
 Amaranth, Bush & Pole Beans, Lima Beans, Carrots, Cucumber, Eggplant, Endive, Okra, Bunching Onions, Southern Peas, Peppers, Summer Squash, Winter Squash and Tomatoes
Don't forget the Herbs and Wildflowers
 
Amaranth, Bush & Pole Beans, Lima Beans, Beets, Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Carrots, Cauliflower, celery, Chinese Cabbage, Collards, Cucumber, Eggplant, Endive, Kale, Mustard, Bunching Onions, Peppers, Summer Squash, Winter Squash, Tomatoes and Turnips
Don't forget the Herbs and Wildflowers
 


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Growing Tomatillo from Seed to Harvest Posted on 19 Jul 09:29 , 0 comments

Tomatillo is an often overlooked heirloom variety.  Native to Mexico and domesticated by the Aztecs around 800 B.C., the tomatillo is one of our most ancient food bearing plants.

Growing Tomatillo is similar to growing tomatoes but isn't as heavy a feeder as tomatoes.

Select a growing area with full sun exposure and well-drained, moderately rich soil.

The rule of thumb for sowing seeds is to plant the seed twice as deep as it is wide (or twice as deep as the diameter of the seed). Tomatillo seeds are really small, so don’t plant them very deep – they only need to be planted 1/8″ – 1/4″ deep.  Grow at least 2 plants at a time, more if you plan to make a bit of salsa.

My personal rule of thumb is to always plant more than you think you'll will need.  This will come in handy if you have pest issues such as bugs, birds, squirrels and even cats.  If you produce more than you need or use, you can always store for later or share with friends and family.

 

Similar to growing tomatoes, Tomatillo sprouts roots along the stems, so it does well when planted deep in the soil. Tomatillo plants grow 3 to 4 feet tall and about the same in width, so space the plants 3 feet apart in rows 3 to 4 feet apart. Plan to give them support in the form of gardening trellises or tomato cages.

Tomatillo will continue to produce until frost takes over.  Although moderately drought-tolerant, tomatillos do best with an inch or so of water per week (more if you live in a very hot climate).

 

You know a tomatillo is ready to be cut from the plant when the fruit has filled out the husk. Left to ripen further, the fruit will frequently split the husk and turn yellow or purple depending on its genetics.


We hope you have enjoyed yet another informative growing article here at Mary's Heirloom Seeds.  If you have additional questions please ask!



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JUNE PLANTING GUIDE FOR THE US Posted on 25 May 08:36 , 0 comments

JUNE is time to plant PUMPKIN 
in time for OCTOBER - NOVEMBER

If you're looking to plant this month and SAVE on seeds,

SAN DIEGO 

Arugula, Bush & Pole Beans, Lima Beans, Beets, Brussels Sprouts, Carrots, Chard, Sweet Corn, Cucumber, Dwarf Cabbage, Endive, Gourds (Louffa), Kale, Lettuce, Melons, Mustard, Okra, Onions, Peas, Peppers,  Pumpkin, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Scallion, Sorrel, Summer Squash & Winter Squash, Tomato and Watermelon.
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY  Herb!! Don't forget the   Wildflowers!

 

Arugula, Bush & Pole Beans, Lima Beans, Cantaloupe, Carrots, Sweet Corn, Cucumber, Endive, Gourds (Louffa), Lettuce, Melons, Okra, Southern Peas, Peppers, Sweet Potato, Radish, Radicchio and Watermelon.
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY  Herb!! Don't forget the   Wildflowers!

 
Arugula, Beans, Beets, Dwarf Cabbage, Corn, Cucumber, Endive, Eggplant, Gourds (louffa),  Lettuce, Kale, Melons, Okra, Peas, Peppers, Pumpkin, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Scallions, SorrelSummer Squash, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes, Turnips and Watermelon. 
 Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow 
Pretty much EVERY Herb!!
Don't forget the  Wildflowers!  
  

Arugula, Beans, Collards, Corn, Cucumber, Gourds (Louffa), Endive, Leeks, Lettuce, Melons, Mustard, Okra, Peas, Peppers, Pumpkin, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Scallions, Sorrel, Summer Squash, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes, Turnips and Watermelon. 
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY  Herb!!
Don't forget the  Wildflowers


Arugula, Beans, Beets, Collards, Corn, Cucumber, Gourds (Louffa), Leeks, Lettuce, Melons, Mustard, Okra, Onions, Peas, Peppers, Pumpkin, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Scallions, Sorrel, Summer Squash, Swiss Chard, Cherry Tomatoes, Turnips and Watermelon. 
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow.
Pretty much EVERY Herb!!
Don't forget the  Wildflowers!    


Arugula, Beans, Beets, Calabrese Broccoli,
Dwarf Cabbage, Carrots, Corn, Cucumber,
Eggplant (transplant), Endive, Gourds (louffa), Lettuce, Kale, Melons, Mustard, Okra, Onions, Peas, Peppers, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Scallions, Sorrel, Spinach, Summer Squash, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes, Turnips and Watemelon.
 Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY  Herb!
Don't forget the   Wildflowers!  
 


Arugula, Beans, Beets, Broccoli, Cabbage, Carrots, Corn, Cucumber, Eggplant, Endive, Gourds (Louffa), Leeks, Lettuce, Kale, Kohlrabi, Melons, Mustard, Okra, Onions, Peas, Peppers, Pumpkin, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Scallions, Sorrel, Summer Squash, Winter Squash, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes, Turnips and Watermelon. 
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY  Herb!!
Don't forget the  Wildflowers!    


Arugula, Beans, Beets, Broccoli, Cabbage, Carrots, Cauliflower, Corn, Cucumber, Gourds (Louffa), Endive, Eggplant (transplant), Leeks, Lettuce, Kale, Melons, Mustard, Okra, Onions, Peas, Peppers, Radish, Scallions, Sorrel, Spinach, Summer Squash,
 Swiss Chard, Tomatoes and Turnips 
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY Herb!!
Don't forget the   Wildflowers!   

 
Arugula, Beans, Collards, Corn, Cucumber, Endive, Lettuce, Melons, Mustard, OKRA, Peas, Peppers, Pumpkins, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Scallion, Sorrel, Squash, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes, Turnips and Watermelon. 
  Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY  Herb!!!
Don't forget the  Wildflowers


Arugula,  Beans, Collards, Corn, Endive, Melon, Mustard, Okra, Onions, Peas, Peppers, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Sorrel, Summer Squash, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes, Turnips and Watermelon. 
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY  Herb!!! 
Don't forget  WILDFLOWERS!  
  


Arugula, Beans, Beets, Calabrese Broccoli, Cabbage, Carrots, Corn, Endive, Lettuce, Kale, Melon, Mustard, Okra, Peas, Peppers, Radish, Scallions, Sorrel, Spinach, Summer Squash, Swiss Chard and Tomatoes

Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY Herb!!
Don't forget the    Wildflowers
   


Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Basil, Beans, Beets, Calendula flowerCarrots, Celery, Chard, Cilantro, Corn, Cucumbers, Dill, Eggplant, Endive, Kale, Lettuce, Melons, Okra, Onion, Peas, transplant Peppers, Pumpkins, Radish, Scallions, Spinach, Squash (summer & winter), transplant Tomatoes and Watermelon 


NEW MEXICO
Arugula, Beans, Beets, Broccoli, Calendula flower, Carrots, Celery, Corn, Cucumber, Lettuce, Melon, Okra, Onions, Parsnips, Peas, Peppers, Potatoes, Pumpkins, Radish, Spinach, Summer Squash, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes, Turnips and Watermelon
Plant Herbs and Wildflowers


 
Sow Outdoors: Arugula, Basil, Beans, Beets, Calendula flowerCarrots, Celery, Chard, Cilantro, Corn, Cucumbers, Dill, Eggplant, Endive, Kale, Lettuce, Melons, Okra, Onion, Peas, Peppers, Pumpkins, Radish, Scallions, Spinach, Squash (summer & winter), Tomatoes and Watermelon




Arugula, OKRA, Southern Peas, Peppers, Radish and Swiss Chard. Heat loving herbs such as Basil, Tarragon, Summer Savory Cumin and Rosemary.
 
Arugula, OKRA, Southern Peas, Peppers, Radish and Swiss Chard. Heat loving herbs such as Basil, Tarragon, Summer Savory Cumin and Rosemary.
 
Arugula, OKRA, Southern Peas, Peppers, Radish and Swiss Chard. Heat loving herbs such as Basil, Tarragon, Summer Savory Cumin and Rosemary.
 


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