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SOIL Recipes for Raised Bed Gardens Posted on 31 Jan 14:33 , 4 comments

I love our raised bed gardens!!!  There are so many benefits such as less water usage, almost zero weeding and best of all, LOTS of food produced in a small space.

I've had so many questions about what to use for Garden Soil.  The thing is, you can ask all of the "experts" and there is no absolute "right" way.  No one way works for everyone so below you will find some of the recommended recipes for gardens beds.  You'll also find my own recommendations based on what has worked for me.

Vegetable plants need loose, free-draining soil with readily available nutrients to produce abundantly. Each year's crop takes a bit of the nutrient base of the soil with it, so this must be returned on an annual basis to keep the garden productive.  This means adding amendments every year to maintain a healthy balance of nutrients.

First, a caution for the thrifty.  Be wary of advertisements for cheap or free bulk topsoil, as this material is generally scraped from construction sites and may be full of roots and rocks, making it unsuitable planting vegetables. Go to the landscape supply yard and look at the options to make sure you are getting a loose, clean, lightweight material that has compost already mixed in.

If you are building and filling  multiple beds, buying bagged soil isn't economical.  Call around your area and ask for bulk organic topsoil.  You might not be able to find "organic" soil so you can always ask for untreated soil.

1 - 4 foot by 4 foot raised bed takes 16 cubic feet of soil or approx 1/2 a cubic yard of soil

I saw one recipe that called for 1/3 Peat moss, 1/3 vermiculite and 1/3 compost.

This is not a recipe I use.  First, peat moss is on the acidic side.  Coconut Coir is neutral and a more sustainable addition to your garden.  Next, too much vermiculite will keep your soil from retaining moisture and nutrients.

Here's another recipe I found:
  • 3 parts compost
  • 1 part peat moss 
  • 1 part vermiculite

Here's my all time favorite from Rodales:
You want the kind that’s dark, rich, and loaded with microorganisms. Fill your beds with a mix of 50 to 60 percent good-quality topsoil and 40 to 50 percent well-aged compost. Before each new growing season, test your soil for pH and nutrient content. You can buy a kit at most home-improvement stores. If your test shows a need for additional nutrients like nitrogen and potassium, raise levels by working in amendments such as bone meal and kelp. Dress beds with an additional ½ inch of compost later in the growing season to increase organic matter and boost soil health. 

I use my own version of the above recipe.  I add coconut coir to each bed.  Depending on what I'm planting, if it needs lighter soil I'll add a bit of vermiculite.  Most of our beds are fed with our own DIY Organic Liquid Fertilizer Mix

We've been building up our own compost and amending the topsoil we purchased by the truckload several years ago.  If you are just getting started, you might have to shop around for a healthy option.


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Build Your Own Raised Beds and GROW! Posted on 31 Jan 13:22 , 3 comments

We're finally updating our Build Your Own Raised Bed tutorial!  Our first post was in 2015 when we moved to our new homestead and built a bunch of 8 foot by 4 foot beds.

We are STILL using these beds but we ended up putting gopher wire on the bottom to keep the gophers out.  We've also adapted this tutorial to make a few 4 foot by 4 foot beds for different projects or just because they were easier to handle.

Many of you have seen our updates on facebook.  We have expanded our growing area over the last week.  This place is HUGE!  We wanted to get growing fast but with the rocky ground (and gophers) at our new homestead, we decided to build raised beds.  Here's how we built...


Tools:
Drill (required)
Circular saw (optional)  
Staple Gun (optional) 

Lumber & Supplies:
We purchased 2"x12"x16' untreated boards
untreated 4"x4" posts-Buy it 8 feet long and have it cut in 1 foot long posts
48" landscaping cloth (optional)
 3" deck screws from a local hardware shop.
It takes 1 and a 1/2 boards to make these 4X8 beds.  
That means 12 boards will make 8 beds.


A few thing I've learned:
Landscaping cloth works to keep the weeds out but NOT gophers.

If you have gophers or other burrowing pests, I highly recommend gopher wire or hardware cloth (it's not actually cloth).  Affix the wire to the bottom of the bed after you build the bed but before you fill with dirt

The 3 inch deck screws can be expensive but they are well worth it

I was told that the 4" post at each corner was overkill but I feel it is worth it.  Our raised beds are in great shape so far!

If you choose to build 4 foot by 4 foot beds, you can purchase pre-cut boards OR buy 1- 2X12X16 and have it cut into 4 foot boards.

If you prefer to make smaller beds then you will need to re-adjust length/quantity of boards. 

Screws: 32 
3 inch "Star Drive" deck screws
*These include a drill bit* 
The 2"x12" board were cut in 4' and 8' pieces.   
The 4"x4" posts were cut in 12" pieces.
If you don't have a circular saw (or want to make the boards easier to handle) I suggest having the people at the shop cut your boards. 
The 12" pieces of 4x4 post were attached  
to the ends of the 2x12x8 pieces with the  
3" deck screws: *4 screws per board per corner* 
32 screws total


After taking the 4' and 8' boards to the garden the 4' and 8' boards were assembled so that the 4' boards covered the ends of the 8' boards with their attached posts. 


This gave the assembled bed a 4'x8' OUTSIDE dimension gopher wire was attached to the bottom

Now, we have pictures of our 4 foot by 4 foot beds!


4 ft by 4 ft bed


4 ft by 4 ft bed with gopher wire


We used a staple gun to attach the gopher wire to each bed
The assembled bed was then placed gopher-wire side down and filled with good, organic soil with plenty of Organic Nutrients added to the beds.

4 X 4 growing Organic Radish


For 4 beds @ 4ft X 8ft we used about
5 cubic yards of soil.
Water the bed once it's filled with dirt and organic plant food.  We added more dirt once the soil compacted a bit.
TIME TO PLANT HEIRLOOM SEEDS!

If you have additional questions about getting started or would like more info please feel free to ask.  As always, I am happy to help.

If you'd like to check out some of our gardening tips, check out our fb page. 

Stay tuned for info on FILLING and maintaining these beds!


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Grow Your Own Salsa Garden with Recipe Posted on 12 Nov 06:51 , 0 comments

Who doesn't like Salsa?  There are so many variations of Salsa, mild to hot, mango to jalapeno and even green tomato salsa.  Creating a Salsa Garden is easy!  Mary's Heirloom Seeds has made things even easier with Mary's Salsa Pack Seed Combo!

My first suggestion, Coconut Pellets!  They make seed-starting "oh so easy."  Before you just go crazy and start planting all of the seeds it's important to decide which varieties you would like to include and how long each will take to mature.
Onions:
Not everyone likes onions in their salsa.  I do!  I prefer a red onion.  The Red Burgundy onion matures in approximately 100 days.  If you decide to grow this onion it should be planted first.  If you choose a bunching onion or a "green onion" you can wait on planting.  Bunching onion varieties take about 40 days to mature.

Tomatoes:
I prefer to use a smaller tomato for salsa like the Ace 55 or Roma.  Both varieties take approx 75-80 days to mature so they should be started one month after the onion (if you chose the red).  A larger option is a BeefsteakFor fancy salsa, try Emerald Green or Amana's Orange tomatoes.

Peppers:
For a mild salsa you can use Anaheim instead.  For a hot (or hotter) salsa I use Jalapenos.  For the crazy, burn your mouth for a week salsa, use Serrano Peppers or Habanero!  These pepper varieties also take 70-80 days to mature and should be planted at the same time as the tomatoes.

Cilantro planting should be staggered throughout the year.  By planting multiple cilantro plants it will allow you to harvest as you need it instead of all at once.  Plant Cilantro at least 30 days before the rest of the Salsa Garden plants mature.  I recommend succession planting Cilantro for a plentiful harvest.
I love growing Cilantro
Recap-
Onions: 100 or 40 days
Tomatoes: 75-80 days
Peppers: 70-80 days
Cilantro: 30 days

Fresh Salsa

Ingredients
5 large tomatoes, chopped
1 onion, chopped
1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro
3 cloves garlic, minced (optional)
1 tablespoon lime juice
1 tomatillo, diced (optional)
salt to taste
1 jalapeno pepper, minced
Directions
In a medium-size mixing bowl, combine tomatoes, onion, cilantro, garlic, lime juice, tomatillo, and salt to taste. Mix well. Add 1/2 of the jalapeno pepper, and taste. If you desire your salsa with more of a kick, add the remaining 1/2 jalapeno. If you are satisfied with the salsa's heat, do not add the remaining jalapeno pepper. Cover the salsa, and chill until ready to serve. 

Mary's Salsa Pack is available @ Mary's Heirloom Seeds for only $18.
(Gift wrap not included)

Make wonderful homemade salsa fresh from the garden!
 One packet of each.  Includes:
   - Thessaloniki Tomato
   -Jalapeno Pepper
   -Anaheim Pepper
   -Red Burgundy Onion
   -Cilantro


A great addition to Mary's Salsa Pack is the natural and Organic Soil Amendments.

I use DIY Organic Liquid Plant Food on my own veggies and I love it!  The difference in plant growth, flowering and crops has been fantastic.

Happy Planting! 
 

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JUNE Planting Guide for the US Posted on 27 May 11:33 , 0 comments


Are you ready to GET PLANTING?
http://www.marysheirloomseeds.com/





Mary's Heirloom Seeds Newsletter
JUNE Seed Planting Guide for the US by Region

Seed Combo Packs

seed pack combo
 

   
 Like us on Facebook  Follow us on Twitter 

Happy Friday!  Do you have plans for your garden this weekend?
Below you'll find our recommendations for JUNE seed planting as well as SEED SPECIALS!
 
JUNE Seed Starting Guide
for the US by Region

JUNE is time to plant PUMPKIN 
in time for OCTOBER - NOVEMBER


Arugula Bush & Pole Beans, Lima Beans, Beets, Brussels Sprouts, Carrots, Chard, Sweet Corn, Cucumber, Dwarf Cabbage, Endive, Gourds (Louffa), Kale, Lettuce, Melons, Mustard, Okra, Onions, Peas, Peppers,  Pumpkin, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Scallion, Sorrel, Summer Squash & Winter Squash, Tomato and Watermelon.
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY  Herb!! Don't forget the   Wildflowers!
 

 
Arugula, Bush & Pole Beans, Lima Beans, Cantaloupe, Sweet Corn, Cucumber, Endive, Gourds (Louffa), Lettuce, Melons, Okra, Southern Peas, Peppers, Sweet Potato, Radish, Radicchio and Watermelon.
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY  Herb!! Don't forget the   Wildflowers!
 
Arugula, Beans, Beets, Dwarf Cabbage, Corn, Cucumber, Endive, Eggplant, Gourds (louffa),  Lettuce, Kale, Melons, Okra, Peas, Peppers, Pumpkin, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Scallions, SorrelSummer Squash, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes, Turnips and Watermelon. 
 Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow 
Pretty much EVERY Herb!!
Don't forget the  Wildflowers!
 
 
  
Arugula, Beans, Collards, Corn, Cucumber, Gourds (Louffa), Endive, Leeks, Lettuce, Melons, Mustard, Okra, Peas, Peppers, Pumpkin, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Scallions, Sorrel, Summer Squash, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes, Turnips and Watermelon. 
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY  Herb!!
Don't forget the  Wildflowers
 
 
Arugula, Beans, Beets, Collards, Corn, Cucumber, Gourds (Louffa), Leeks, Lettuce, Melons, Mustard, Okra, Onions, Peas, Peppers, Pumpkin, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Scallions, Sorrel, Summer Squash, Swiss Chard, Cherry Tomatoes, Turnips and Watermelon. 
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow.
Pretty much EVERY Herb!!
Don't forget the  Wildflowers
 
 

Arugula, Beans, Beets, Calabrese Broccoli,
Dwarf Cabbage, Carrots, Corn, Cucumber,
Eggplant (transplant), Endive, Gourds (louffa), Lettuce, Kale, Melons, Mustard, Okra, Onions, Peas, Peppers, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Scallions, Sorrel, Spinach, Summer Squash, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes, Turnips and Watemelon.
 Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY  Herb!
Don't forget the   Wildflowers
 
 
Arugula, Beans, Beets, Broccoli, Cabbage, Carrots, Corn, Cucumber, Eggplant, Endive, Gourds (Louffa), Leeks, Lettuce, Kale, Kohlrabi, Melons, Mustard,
Okra, Onions, Peas, Peppers, Pumpkin, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Scallions, Sorrel, Summer Squash, Winter Squash, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes, Turnips and Watermelon. 
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY  Herb!!
Don't forget the  Wildflowers
 
 
Arugula, Beans, Beets, Broccoli, Cabbage, Carrots, Cauliflower, Corn, Cucumber, Gourds (Louffa), Endive, Eggplant (transplant), Leeks, Lettuce, 
Kale, Melons, Mustard, Okra, Onions, Peas, Peppers, Radish, Scallions, Sorrel, Spinach, Summer Squash,
Swiss Chard, Tomatoes and Turnips 
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY Herb!!
Don't forget the   Wildflowers
 
 


Arugula, Beans, Collards, Corn, Cucumber, Endive, Lettuce, Melons, Mustard, OKRA, Peas, Peppers, Pumpkins, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Scallion, Sorrel, Squash, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes, Turnips and Watermelon. 
  Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY  Herb!!!
Don't forget the  Wildflowers


Arugula,  Beans, Beets, Collards, Corn, Endive,  Lettuce, Melon, Mustard, Okra, Onions, Peas, Peppers, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Sorrel, Summer Squash, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes, Turnips and Watermelon. 
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY  Herb!!! 
Don't forget
 WILDFLOWERS!  
  

Arugula, Beans, Beets, Calabrese Broccoli, Cabbage, Corn, Endive, Lettuce, Kale, Melon, Mustard, Okra,   
Peas, Peppers, Radish, Scallions, Sorrel, Spinach, Summer Squash, Swiss Chard and Tomatoes
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY Herb!!
Don't forget the    Wildflowers
   
 
If you have additional questions please feel free to ask.  What will YOU plant this JUNE?
 
Sincerely,                                   
Mary
The doctor of the future will give no medicine, but will interest her or his patients in the care of the human frame, in a proper diet, and in the cause and prevention of disease.
Thomas A. Edison 
 "The garden suggests there might be a place where we can meet nature halfway."
Michael Pollan 
Mary's Heirloom Seeds, P. O. Box 3763, Ramona, CA 92065

JUNE Planting Guide for the US Posted on 27 May 11:33 , 0 comments


Are you ready to GET PLANTING?
http://www.marysheirloomseeds.com/





Mary's Heirloom Seeds Newsletter
JUNE Seed Planting Guide for the US by Region

Seed Combo Packs

seed pack combo
 

   
 Like us on Facebook  Follow us on Twitter 

Happy Friday!  Do you have plans for your garden this weekend?
Below you'll find our recommendations for JUNE seed planting as well as SEED SPECIALS!
 
JUNE Seed Starting Guide
for the US by Region

JUNE is time to plant PUMPKIN 


Arugula Bush & Pole Beans, Lima Beans, Beets, Brussels Sprouts, Carrots, Chard, Sweet Corn, Cucumber, Dwarf Cabbage, Endive, Gourds (Louffa), Kale, Lettuce, Melons, Mustard, Okra, Onions, Peas, Peppers,  Pumpkin, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Scallion, Sorrel, Summer Squash & Winter Squash, Tomato and Watermelon.
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY  Herb!! Don't forget the   Wildflowers!
 

 
Arugula, Bush & Pole Beans, Lima Beans, Cantaloupe, Sweet Corn, Cucumber, Endive, Gourds (Louffa), Lettuce, Melons, Okra, Southern Peas, Peppers, Sweet Potato, Radish, Radicchio and Watermelon.
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY  Herb!! Don't forget the   Wildflowers!
 
Arugula, Beans, Beets, Dwarf Cabbage, Corn, Cucumber, Endive, Eggplant, Gourds (louffa),  Lettuce, Kale, Melons, Okra, Peas, Peppers, Pumpkin, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Scallions, SorrelSummer Squash, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes, Turnips and Watermelon. 
 Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow 
Pretty much EVERY Herb!!
Don't forget the  Wildflowers!
 
 
  
Arugula, Beans, Collards, Corn, Cucumber, Gourds (Louffa), Endive, Leeks, Lettuce, Melons, Mustard, Okra, Peas, Peppers, Pumpkin, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Scallions, Sorrel, Summer Squash, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes, Turnips and Watermelon. 
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY  Herb!!
Don't forget the  Wildflowers
 
 
Arugula, Beans, Beets, Collards, Corn, Cucumber, Gourds (Louffa), Leeks, Lettuce, Melons, Mustard, Okra, Onions, Peas, Peppers, Pumpkin, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Scallions, Sorrel, Summer Squash, Swiss Chard, Cherry Tomatoes, Turnips and Watermelon. 
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow.
Pretty much EVERY Herb!!
Don't forget the  Wildflowers
 
 

Arugula, Beans, Beets, Calabrese Broccoli,
Dwarf Cabbage, Carrots, Corn, Cucumber,
Eggplant (transplant), Endive, Gourds (louffa), Lettuce, Kale, Melons, Mustard, Okra, Onions, Peas, Peppers, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Scallions, Sorrel, Spinach, Summer Squash, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes, Turnips and Watemelon.
 Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY  Herb!
Don't forget the   Wildflowers
 
 
Arugula, Beans, Beets, Broccoli, Cabbage, Carrots, Corn, Cucumber, Eggplant, Endive, Gourds (Louffa), Leeks, Lettuce, Kale, Kohlrabi, Melons, Mustard,
Okra, Onions, Peas, Peppers, Pumpkin, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Scallions, Sorrel, Summer Squash, Winter Squash, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes, Turnips and Watermelon. 
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY  Herb!!
Don't forget the  Wildflowers
 
 
Arugula, Beans, Beets, Broccoli, Cabbage, Carrots, Cauliflower, Corn, Cucumber, Gourds (Louffa), Endive, Eggplant (transplant), Leeks, Lettuce, 
Kale, Melons, Mustard, Okra, Onions, Peas, Peppers, Radish, Scallions, Sorrel, Spinach, Summer Squash,
Swiss Chard, Tomatoes and Turnips 
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY Herb!!
Don't forget the   Wildflowers
 
 


Arugula, Beans, Collards, Corn, Cucumber, Endive, Lettuce, Melons, Mustard, OKRA, Peas, Peppers, Pumpkins, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Scallion, Sorrel, Squash, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes, Turnips and Watermelon. 
  Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY  Herb!!!
Don't forget the  Wildflowers


Arugula,  Beans, Beets, Collards, Corn, Endive,  Lettuce, Melon, Mustard, Okra, Onions, Peas, Peppers, Radish, Radicchio, Rutabaga, Sorrel, Summer Squash, Swiss Chard, Tomatoes, Turnips and Watermelon. 
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY  Herb!!! 
Don't forget
 WILDFLOWERS!  
  

Arugula, Beans, Beets, Calabrese Broccoli, Cabbage, Corn, Endive, Lettuce, Kale, Melon, Mustard, Okra,   
Peas, Peppers, Radish, Scallions, Sorrel, Spinach, Summer Squash, Swiss Chard and Tomatoes
Herbs: Anise, Basil, Borage, Calendula, Catnip, Chamomile, Caraway, Chives, Cilantro, Comfrey, Dill, Echinacea, Lavender,  Lemon Bee Balm, Lemonbalm, Lemongrass, Mugwort, Oregano, Parsley, Sage, Tarragon, Toothache Plant, Thyme and Yarrow
Pretty much EVERY Herb!!
Don't forget the    Wildflowers
   
 
in time for OCTOBER - NOVEMBER

If you have additional questions please feel free to ask.  What will YOU plant this JUNE?
 
Sincerely,                                   
Mary
The doctor of the future will give no medicine, but will interest her or his patients in the care of the human frame, in a proper diet, and in the cause and prevention of disease.
Thomas A. Edison 
 "The garden suggests there might be a place where we can meet nature halfway."
Michael Pollan 
Mary's Heirloom Seeds, P. O. Box 3763, Ramona, CA 92065

9 Easiest Vegetables to Grow from Seed to Harvest Posted on 18 May 11:36 , 0 comments

If you search the web, you'll find that many gardeners agree on the top easy veggies to grow.  We all have our challenges and our favorites.

You don't have to have a "farm" or land to grow food.  If you're up to it, read my recent article "You Don't Need a Farm to Grow Your Own Food."  


Just last week we posted about our Bucket Garden Project.  "For this project, 100% of the buckets used are recycled.  Some of the buckets were from previous projects and the yellow ones once held fresh kitty litter.  The white buckets are food grade.  The goal of this project to spend as little as possible and still grow food."


So let's get started!


People often ask, "What's the easiest veggie to grow?"  For me, that's a tough one.  If I had to choose just ONE, the easiest veggie with the best yield, it would have to be Swiss Chard.   Swiss Chard is easy to grow from seed and provides continual harvest for several months after maturity.  Swiss Chard can survive warm and hot climates so that's a plus.


What are the 9 Easiest Veggies to Grow?



Planting:
Soak seeds overnight in water before planting to ensure strong germination. Plant seeds half an inch deep and 3 inches apart. Set out seedlings 12 inches apart. Indoors or out, thin newly germinated seedlings with cuticle scissors instead of pulling them out. Chard seed capsules often contain two or more seeds. If more than one germinates, promptly snip off all but the strongest sprout at the soil line

Harvesting:
Twist off individual outer leaves and compost old leaves that have lost their glossy sheen. Three to five leaves can be picked from mature plants at a time, but be sure to leave the growing crown intact.

CHARD growing in a container


Radishes are a cool weather crop best planted in spring and autumn. Growing radishes during the hot summer months will cause them to bolt.  

Planting: When preparing the planting bed, loosen the soil 6 to 10 inches deep, and mix in good compost or well-rotted manure. Sow seeds a half inch deep and 1 inch apart, in rows spaced 12 inches apart. After the seedlings appear, thin salad radishes to 3 inches apart; thin oriental radishes to 8 to 10 inches apart.

Harvest: Some Radish varieties such as Early Scarlet Globe radish can mature in as few as 22 days!
RADISH is a quick growing veggie!


Planting:  All types of lettuce grow best when the soil is kept constantly moist, and outside temperatures range between 45 and 75 degrees Fahrenheit.

Prepare your planting bed by loosening the soil to at least 10 inches deep. Mix in an inch or so of good compost or well-rotted manure. Sow lettuce seeds a quarter of an inch deep and 1 inch apart in rows or squares, or simply broadcast them over the bed.

Harvest: Harvest lettuce in the morning, after the plants have had all night to plump up with water.
LETTUCE is a great container vegetable



For the sake of simplicity, I classify beans in 2 categories: Bush and Pole.

Bush beans are usually compact and grow close to the ground. Pole beans climb and require a trellis or other support. Bush beans tend to produce more beans in a shorter time, while pole beans will produce more over an entire season. Pole beans typically require much less.

Planting: Wait until well after the last frost before you plant the beans as they all like warm soil for germination. Plant the seeds about an inch below the surface and keep watered until the seed germinate

Harvest: Whether you grow pole beans or bush beans you will have an abundant harvest if you remember to pick regularly. Most beans are harvested before the seed grows too large, and the overall harvest will continue for many weeks if the beans are picked every day or so.
BEANS are one of my favorite!


Planting: In the spring, sow carrot seeds in fertile, well-worked soil about two weeks before your last frost date. In cool climates, continue planting every three weeks until midsummer.  Sow your seeds about a quarter inch deep and 2 inches apart, in rows spaced at least 10 inches apart; carrots do well in double or triple rows. Thin seedlings to 4 to 6 inches apart, depending on the variety’s mature size.

Harvesting: Pull or dig spring-sown carrots when roots reach mature size and show rich color.  Summer-sown carrots that mature in cool fall soil can be left in the ground longer, but should be dug before the ground freezes to preserve their quality
Delicious CARROTS


There are two types of cucumbers: slicing and pickling. Each type comes in several different varieties. The slicing types are long and usually grow to about 6 or 8 inches in length while the pickling types are shorter, reaching around 3 to 4 inches once mature.

Planting:
Thoroughly water the soil before plant­ing seeds half an inch deep and 6 inches apart. When the seedlings have three leaves, thin them to 12 inches apart, which is the spacing you should use if transplanting seedlings.

Harvest: To maximize production, harvest fruits as soon as they reach picking size. Pick daily, be­cause under ideal conditions, cucumber fruits can double in size in just one day. Use scissors or small shears to snip fruits with a short stub of stem attached.
Tiny CUCUMBER growing on the vine!


The two main things you can do to keep your summer squash plants healthy and productive are to provide plenty of water and to fertilize regularly. Water your plants when the top inch of soil is dry (test by poking your finger into the soil) and then, water deeply and gently so the water percolates down into the soil

Planting: Soak seeds in water for 24 hours before planting to ensure strong germination.  Direct seed ½ to 1 inch deep into hills or rows.

Harvest: Harvest zucchini squash when the fruits are small. This will result in a more tender and flavorful squash.
Last year some of our ZUCCHINI grew HUGE!


There are two basic Types of Tomatoes: Determinate and Indeterminate. 

Determinate tomatoes produce the fruit all at once. These are typically bush tomatoes, and make the best tomatoes for container gardening. Since all the tomatoes are ripe within a short period of time, these are great plant choices if you plan to can or have a short tomato growing season.

Indeterminate tomatoes grow on a vine. If properly cared for, will produce all season until the first frost.

For indoor seed starting: Start seeds indoors under bright fluorescent lights in early spring, about six to eight weeks before your last spring frost

Soak seeds in water for 24 hours before planting to ensure strong germination.  Sow seeds 1/4 inch deep and gently cover with soil

The easiest way to grow tomatoes from seed is to plant seeds in small containers.  Tomato seeds usually germinate in 5-14 days.  Once seedlings are 4-8 inches tall, transplant into a 5-gallon container/bucket or into your garden.
Homegrown HEIRLOOM TOMATOES


Easy-to-grow beets do double-duty in the kitchen, producing tasty roots for baking, boiling or sautéing and fresh greens to boil or steam.

Planting:  Begin planting beet seeds directly in the garden one month before your last spring frost date, followed by a second planting two to three weeks later. Beet seeds can germinate in cool soil, but they sprout best when soil temperatures are above 50 degrees

Start planting beets for fall harvest 10 to 12 weeks before your expected first fall frost.

Harvest:  Beets can be harvested whenever they grow to the desired size. About 60 days are required for beets to reach 1 1/2 inches in diameter
Delicious BEETS

We hope you have enjoyed yet another informative growing article here at Mary's Heirloom Seeds.  If you have additional questions please ask! 
 
Below you will find a list of Helpful Links! *UPDATED*

 
Current Series: Container Gardening

Seed Starting Tips Series


Organic Pest Control Series:

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Start A Bucket Garden Posted on 10 May 05:58 , 3 comments

Why a "Bucket Garden" you ask?  At Mary's Heirloom Seeds we are dedicated to helping people grow their own food and we understand that Space and funds are often a factor.
For this project, 100% of the buckets used are recycled.  Some of the buckets were from previous projects and the yellow ones once held fresh kitty litter.  The white buckets are food grade.  The goal of this project to spend as little as possible and still grow food.
Helpful article: Growing in Containers
IF you are interested in starting this project and you are going to BUY buckets, I would suggest purchasing the white Food Grade buckets at your local hardware store.

**PLEASE read: We understand that people have concerns about growing in plastic or the use of plastic.  Food Grade buckets are available.  Our goal for this project is help people grow no matter their space or financial circumstance**

To keep the grass and weeds from growing up inside the buckets, I used landscaping cloth which I already had in the garage.  This step is optional.  You can lay down cardboard as a weed blocker if you'd like.

We just posted GROWING IN CONTAINERS on our blog if you're interested in What to Plant in containers

We drilled holes in the bottom of each bucket to keep the soil from getting waterlogged.  Drainage is important.

When I first started this project, I just filled up the buckets I had available.  

I would have saved a lot of time and effort if I had planned out my area with EMPTY buckets.  Please feel free to learn from my experience.  Map out how many buckets you have and how much space you intend to use BEFORE filling up each bucket.

If you're buying bags of soil, 1.5 cubic feet bag of soil = 11.22 US gallons.  That means 1 bag should fill up 2 buckets.  If you choose to add perlite or Coconut Coir then you'll need to adjust.

For my buckets, I added composted horse manure to the bottom of each bucket.  The manure is FREE from our neighbors.  You might be able to find soil and compost free on community forums.
Additional soil amendments include Azomite and Mary's Organic Plant Food.  Once seeds are planted and seedlings are transplanted, each bucket will be watered with Endo & Ecto Mycorrhizae Root Boost

Here we have 23 containers.  This is a small project at the moment.  ***We have several customers that have sent pics of their gardens since posting.  Some are growing in 60 and even 100 buckets***


I transplanted 3 tomatoes and 3 beans into the buckets so far and 2 already had mint planted.  Next I'll plant SEEDS.  Stay tuned for our next update.


We hope you have enjoyed yet another informative growing article here at Mary's Heirloom Seeds.  If you have additional questions please ask!


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GROWING IN CONTAINERS Posted on 09 May 19:58 , 0 comments

Even if you have the space to grow in ground, there are many reasons to grow in containers.  A few reasons to grow in containers include

Save water

Save space

Great for small spaces

Economical if you use recycled containers



First, SOIL!  Soil for containers should be lighter and "fluffier" than garden soil.  I like to add Coconut Coir, Humic Acid and Greensand


Additional soil amendments:
Endo & Ecto Mycorrhizae
Organic, Non-GMO Alfalfa Meal
Organic Azomite
Organic Kelp Meal




What is Compost?
Compost is a natural soil amendment/garden fertilizer.  It can be made using kitchen scraps and yard "waste."  Not only does composting save money on expensive fertilizers, it keeps all of the organic "trash" from going into your garbage bins and out of the landfills.  Using compost improves soil structure, texture, aeration and increases the soils water-holding capacity. 
Warning: Everything I read about composting says not to use meat, dairy products or pet waste. Stay away from using lawn clipping if they are contaminated with weed killer or other harmful chemicals.

Do you need to buy a fancy Compost Bin?  Nope!  I use a large "tuff-bin" with holes drilled in the bottom.  I've added kitchen scraps, yard clipping, shredded newspaper and then re-cover.  Every 4-5 days I turn the soil with a shovel to speed up decomposition.  Seaweed is a great activator and is high in nitrogen.

Nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium are produced naturally by the feeding of microorganisms and decomposing waste.  These are essential to a thriving veggie garden.

Tomato seedling in a recycled container

Veggie Varieties that Grow well in Containers

Most vegetable and herb varieties grow well in containers.  Below are a few of the easier veggies for containers.

BEANS:
Bush types are easy and can be prolific producers.  Pole & Runner types will need to be trellised.  If you have a fence to use, place your container approx 6 inches from the fence and let your beans take over!

CABBAGE:
If you've got an area with partial shade, cabbage is a great option.  Smaller varieties such as Nero Toscana (Lacinato Kale), Pak Choy and Dwarf Pak Choy will grow well in Containers.

CUCUMBERS:
Surprisingly easy to grow, cucumbers are a great addition to your container garden IF you keep your eye out for pests.  Aphids love my cucumbers and they like to take over the garden.  Using Diatomaceous Earth BEFORE you find aphids is a great solution.  If you find aphids, a simple soapy water spray and Organic Neem Oil should do the trick.

EGGPLANT:
You can grow just about any eggplant variety in containers.  Smaller varieties such as the Japanese White Egg might grow the best.  I have grown Eggplant both in-ground and in containers successfully.

GREENS:
Seriously, anything lettuce or "greens" will grow VERY well in containers.  Most greens do not require a lot of nutrients and will grow well in sun or partial sun (even shady).

GREEN ONIONS:
The He Shi Ko Bunching Onion is a great container variety.  You can use the small bulb AND the green.

PEPPERS:
One of my favorite container varieties.  Personally, I have had better yield and less pests growing peppers in containers.  Peppers are considered "heavy feeders" and growing in containers allow me to feed accordingly and without wasting.

RADISH:
If you're looking for the easiest veggie to grow, try radish.  The French Breakfast Radish and the Early Scarlet Globe Radish can be ready to eat in as few as 23 days.  One thing to keep in mind, if your radish grows spindly, you might need more calcium in your soil.
Beautiful RADISH!

SWEET CORN:
They require full sun and a fair amount of your premium growing space for what will be a relatively small yield. Growing corn in containers is possible but not necessarily easy.

TOMATOES:
Yes, it is possible to grow tomatoes in containers.  It might not be easy but it's possible!  Good soil, and getting the watering just right is the key to success.  If you're looking for a good compact, heirloom variety, try the Thessaloniki Tomato or a cherry-type such as the Black Cherry or German Lunchbox.

TURNIPS:
Root crops such as beets, radish and turnips require deeper containers than greens but don't let that stop you.  Turnips are delicious and nutritious and are a great addition to your container garden.

HERBS!!!   I have yet to meet an herb that does not do well in containers.  Seriously, most herbs are easy to grow and do VERY well in containers!

All of the varieties listed above (and probably more) will do well growing in containers AND raised bed gardens.  If you have additional questions pleas feel free to ask.

Thanks for stopping by my little spot on the web...Stay tuned for more organic gardening and health related topics.  If you have questions or suggestions please feel free to ask. 


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GROWING ORGANIC SQUASH FROM SEED TO HARVEST Posted on 06 Mar 14:36 , 2 comments

SQUASH is a favorite among backyard vegetable gardeners.  It's easy to grow and usually produces more than enough to eat with plenty left over to share.

Last year we had a huge Zucchini Harvest!

What's the difference between Summer Squash and Winter Squash?
 The physical characteristics between summer and winter squash are stark. Summer squash tend to have very thin skins that are edible and easily damaged. The seeds of summer squash are present in the flesh and are edible raw. The flesh of the summer squash is very tender and very perishable. The skins of winter squash varieties are thick, inedible and tough. Winter squash have hollow cavities in the center where hard seeds are located. The flesh of the winter squash is very dense

Summer squash are usually harvested when the squash is immature.  Winter squash takes much longer to ripen. Winter squash is one of the last items to come out of the garden.  Summer Squash is usually ready to harvest in 50-80 days depending on the variety while Winter Squash usually takes 80-110 days. 

Preferred Growing Conditions
Vegetables tend to all like the same growing conditions: full sun, and well drained soil full of organic matter. Organic matter, organic matter, organic matter… Are you sick of hearing about it yet? Organic matter contributes to the health of the soil: gives soil nutrients, aerates soil for better root growth, helps soil retain moisture, while at the same times allows soil to drain better.

The easiest way to add organic matter is to just work a little compost into your soil. Get a composter and make your own by recycling kitchen and yard waste. Or, buy compost or a soil amendment will do the same thing. But, it’s cheaper just to go ahead and buy a compost bin (or recycle a large bin) and make your own.  Coconut Coir can be added to your garden soil for moisture retention.
 
How to Plant Squash Seeds
Plant extra SQUASH seeds to ensure a bountiful harvest.  It just takes a few plants to feed a family. Plant squash in a container, or a garden. Here’s how:
For planting squash in containers, make sure your pot is at least 12 inches wide, that’s about a 5 gallon pot. Pots will dry out fast. That will be your biggest container gardening obstacle. Consider using a fabric pot or a self watering planter, to help control the soil moisture level. 
Golden Crookneck (summer) Squash


Soaking Squash seeds can increase germination rates and speed up germination time.  We soak squash seeds for 24 hours in filtered water before planting.
Soil temperature should be about 70 degrees Fahrenheit before you plant your squash seeds. Plant seeds ½ inches deep and six inches apart. Thin out after seedlings after they emerge, but will need at least two leaves to keep growing. Mature bush summer squash plants should be 20 inches apart in rows that are spaced 2 feet apart. If growing a vine variety, planting in hills works well. Plant about 5 seeds per hill. After seedlings emerge and are established, thin to three plants. Stake or provide a trellis for vining varieties.

Seed starting in containers or Coconut Coir Pellets and then transplanting is a good idea with squash. You can start seeds indoors about four weeks prior to the last frost date. Don’t forget to harden off your seedlings, meaning slowly adjust them to the outdoor climate and sun.

SPAGHETTI (winter) SQUASH


Consider staggering you plantings of summer squash. Planting two weeks apart can keep you harvesting summer squash a little longer. And, don’t forget you get a lot of summer squash from one plant. I think that is why sometimes squash gets a bad wrap. It’s a great tasting vegetable, and easy to grow.  Since Winter Squash takes longer to grow, plan ahead and stagger Winter Squash planting.
Companion Plants for Squash
Beans, corn, cucumbers, icicle radishes, melon, mint, onions and pumpkin. Helpers: Borage deters worms, improves growth and flavor. Marigolds deters beetle. Nasturtium deters squash bugs and beetles.
Oregano provides general pest protection. Dill may repel the squash bug that will kill your squash vines. Generously scatter the dill leaves on your squash plants. Keep squash away from potatoes.

Maintaining Your Squash Plants
Consistent watering is key with squash. Mulch helps a lot with maintaining soil moisture. So, put a good layer of mulch down around summer squash plants. Provide a trellis for support for vining summer & winter squashes to grow.

You might need to assist with pollination. If you are growing just a few plants, you might have to help. Here’s how to do it, and no, you probably didn’t learn this in school. The first flowers that bloom are males. These appear about 40-50 days after planting. A week later the female flowers develop, which will produce the fruit after fertilized by the male flowers. So, to help: pick the first male blooms and brush them against the female bloom. This will help increase the output of summer squash.

TABLE QUEEN ACORN (winter) SQUASH

When to Use Organic Fertilizer
Use an organic fertilizer on summer & winter squash at the time of transplanting. Fertilize again, in about a month. Organic fertilizer is important. We need safe, healthy foods. But also, you don’t want to endanger any beneficial insect helping you with your pollination duties.
Harvesting Summer Squash
Harvest summer squash early. They will taste better when tender, and you’ll want to keep the fruit off the plant so it keeps producing. So, pick when the summer squash is about 2 inches in diameter, or 6-8 inches long. Pattypan squash is best when it reaches 3 inches in diameter, and is still a little pale. If your Pattypan squash gets a little larger, those are great to stuff. 

Harvesting Winter Squash
Fruits are ripe if you cannot easily pierce the rind with your fingernail. Never rush to harvest winter squash, though, because immature fruits won’t store well. Unless pests or freezing weather threaten them, allow fruits to ripen until the vines begin to die back. Expect to harvest three to five squash per plant. Use pruning shears to cut fruits from the vine, leaving 1 inch of stem attached. Clean away dirt with a soft, damp cloth, and allow fruits to cure for two weeks in a spot that’s 70 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit. Store cured squash in a cool, dry place, such as your basement, a cool closet or even under your bed. Check every two weeks for signs of spoilage.

Squash Pests and Diseases
Don’t forget to check summer squash plants for pests often. Squash bugs will set in pretty quickly. They will be your biggest pest problems. Cucumber beetles like summer squash plants, too.

Use Food Grade Diatomaceaous Earth around the base of your squash plants early on to deter pests, especially squash vine borers.

Organic Neem oil is a great organic choice to get rid of these "munching" bugs.
Keep an eye out, too, for these pests and diseases: bacteria wilt, squash vine borers, aphids, mosaic virus, and mildew.

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BUILD YOUR OWN RAISED BEDS Posted on 01 Mar 14:42 , 1 comment

From our previous post in 2015
Did you see my post about Our New Homestead?
Then you know that our new place has LOTS of room to GROW!
We've installed 4 new raised beds and had 2 on the property when we arrived.
 
 
FEBRUARY 12, 2015
Many of you have seen our updates on facebook.  We have expanded our growing area over the last week.  This place is HUGE!
We wanted to get growing fast but with the rocky ground at our new homestead, we decided to build raised beds.  Here's how we built...
Tools:
Drill (required)
Circular saw (optional)  
Staple Gun (optional) 
Lumber:
We purchased 2"x12"x16' untreated boards, untreated 4"x4" posts, 48" landscaping cloth and 3" deck screws from a local hardware shop.
It takes 1 and a 1/2 boards to make these 4X8 beds.  That means 12 boards will make 8 beds.
If you prefer to make smaller beds then you will need to re-adjust length/quantity of boards. 
Screws: 32 
3 inch "Star Drive" deck screws
*These include a drill bit* 
The 2"x12" board were cut in 4' and 8' pieces.   
The 4"x4" posts were cut in 11.25" pieces.
If you don't have a circular saw (or want to make the boards easier to handle) I suggest having the people at the shop cut your boards. 
The 11.25" pieces of 4x4 post were attached  
to the ends of the 2x12x8 pieces with the  
3" deck screws. *4 screws per board per corner* 32 screws total



After taking the 4' and 8' boards to the garden the 4' and 8' boards were assembled so that the 4' boards covered the ends of the 8' boards with their attached posts.   
This gave the assembled bed a 4'x8' OUTSIDE dimension so the landscaping cloth could be attached to one side with staples


If you have gofers, you might consider laying down fine mesh wire (Gofer Wire) below your beds.  We used landscaping cloth or "weed blocker" since we laid the beds down on vegetation for the first few.
UPDATE: We realized that gophers were eating our veggies!!!  We learned our lesson and had to re-do all of the beds with Gopher Wire.
All of the weed blocker was removed.
We used a staple gun to attach the gopher wire to each bed
The assembled bed was then placed gopher-wire side down and filled with good, organic soil with plenty of Organic Nutrients added to the beds. 

For 4 beds @ 4ft X 8ft we used about
5 cubic yards of soil.
Water the bed once it's filled with dirt and organic plant food.  We added more dirt once the soil compacted a bit.
TIME TO PLANT HEIRLOOM SEEDS!
One of our Heirloom Tomato beds (approx 2 months)
If you have additional questions about getting started or would like more info please feel free to ask.  As always, I am happy to help.

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