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NEW Regional Wildflower Mixes Posted on 14 Jun 06:37 , 0 comments

Mary's Heirloom Seeds
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June 14, 2017
Our gardens are THRIVING it's time to add more seed varieties!
At Mary's Heirloom Seeds we currently offer over 450 varieties of seeds
(probably closer to 500 by now)
We offer quite a few Wildflower Seeds

Because you asked, we decided to add a few region-specific wildflower varieties!
Enjoy!
for your Region
 
**CLICK THE IMAGE for a complete list of seed varieties included in each seed mix**
 
 
This wildflower seed mix is formulated for the Gulf Coast, Caribbean, Southern Florida and extreme Southern Texas.


Midwest wildflower seed mixture is made up of 19 species chosen for their lasting blooms as well s their rugged ability to withstand the extremes of the Midwestern climates.Under normal conditions, this mix may reach a height of 24-30 inches.
Mountain wildflower mix is designed to do exceptionally well in the mountain areas of the U.S. The mix consists of 19 species. Many of the wildflower varieties do well in higher elevations with limited moisture. Will reach a height of 36-48 inches under normal conditions
 
 
 
 

 Northeastern wildflower seed mix is designed specifically for the special needs of the Northeast. This attractive wildflower mix is made up of 19 species of which a third are annuals and the remaining are biennials or perennials. This mix will grow 36-48 inches tall under normal conditions.
 
 

 
 
 
 
At  Mary's Heirloom Seeds we're constantly adding to our Planting Tips page!
 Many of you have asked about growing different varieties from seed so we'll continue to share our Growing Tips & Videos
Let's get planting!
CLICK HERE for more unique
 Wildflower Varieties 
HELPFUL LINKS 
If you have additional questions please feel free to ask. 

 

Happy Planting,

 

Mary's Heirloom Seeds, P. O. Box 3763, Ramona, CA 92065

Planting Wildflowers in Your Garden Posted on 11 Mar 07:10 , 1 comment

One of the best things about wildflowers is how easy they are to grow!  In case you missed it, we recently posted an article of EDIBLE FLOWERS at Mary's Heirloom Seeds!

Plan
Check for your last frost date and plant after this has passed.
Choose a spot on your property that gets 6 or more hours of direct sun a day.
Prepare your soil be clearing the area of all existing growth. Simply dig up everything that is growing, turn the soil and rake the area flat. If this is an area that has never before been gardened, you may need to till the area up to remove growth.
 
Plant
Mix the seeds with sand for better visibilty and scatter the seeds directly on top of the soil.
We recommend lighly compressing the seeds into the soil, making sure not to bury them. You can either walk on them, use a board or just pat down with you hands.
 
Grow
Water so that the soil is moist, not soaking wet, until the seedlings are about 4-6" tall. After that, the seedlings will survive on natural rains. If you are experiencing very dry weather, we recommend watering occassionally.
Spring, summer and fall are all wildflower planting times, depending on your region, your weather, and the way you want to approach establishing your meadow. No matter when or where you plant, site preparation is roughly the same. But the first consideration is not the season; it's your climate.
 
For mild-winter areas: If you're planting in a warm place such as California, Florida or southern Texas, with minimal — or no — winter frost, you can plant almost anytime, except during your hottest season. Best time is just before your rainiest season begins, and when you know the weather will not be too hot for young seedlings. In Florida, fall is best. In California, most wildflowers are planted during the winter to take advantage of California's greening in early spring.
 
Nasturtiums
For all areas with killing frost: If you have definite killing frost in winter, things are different. In these areas (most of the country) spring and fall are both fine for planting, and each has its advantages.
 
Wildflowers can re-seed and continue to grow for many years if planted in an area that will allow them to flourish.  Saving seeds from these wildflowers is easy and will ensure flowers for the future.
 
Companion Planting with Flowers


Companion planting is based around the idea that certain plants can benefit others when planted next to, or close to one another.
 
Companion planting exists to benefit certain plants by giving them pest control, naturally without the need to use chemicals, and in some cases they can give a higher crop yield.

Marigolds: Basil, broccoli, cabbage, cucumbers, eggplant, gourds, kale, potatoes, squash and tomatoes.  Often called the "workhorse" of pest deterrents.

Bachelor Button: Attracts pollinators to the garden
 
Lavender: cabbage, cauliflower and fruit trees

Nasturtium: cucumbers, melon, squash, cabbage, broccoli, tomatoes, celery, carrots and radish.  Repels Carrot fly, Japanese beetle, whitefly, aphid and cabbage moth.  


Echinacea Purpurea
Sunflower: Corn, squash and beans.  Attracts pollinators to the garden.

Lupine: nitrogen rich.  Attracts pollinators.  Traps aphids!
Echinacea and Yarrow:  Attracts pollinators to the garden. *Also reported to have medicinal properties*
 
More great companions include:
Additional info on Companion Planting:
I hope you have enjoyed another educational article.  if you have additional questions, please leave a comment below or send an email to mary@marysheirloomseeds.com

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Pollinator Garden Challenge Posted on 26 Jan 20:28 , 0 comments

We recently shared a new report Bumble Bee Put on Endangered Species list.  Every day we encourage people to grow without the use of harmful pesticides and work with pollinators in the garden.

JOIN US in the Million Pollinator Garden Challenge!  Have you heard of the challenge?  

Mary's Heirloom Seeds is joining National Pollinator Garden Network CHALLENGE.  NPGN collectively represents approximately 800,000 gardeners, 10,000 schoolyard gardens and bring a baseline of a 250,000 registered pollinator gardens nationwide from across its five main founding organizations.

The Million Pollinator Garden Challenge (MPGC) is a nationwide call to action to preserve and create gardens and landscapes that help revive the health of bees, butterflies, birds, bats and other pollinators across America. We will move millions of individuals, kids and families outdoors and make a connection between pollinators and the healthy food people eat.

The focus of the NPGN is: to inspire individuals and community groups, institutions and the garden industry to create more pollinator habitat through sustainable gardening practices, habitat conservation and provide these groups the tools to be successful.

So how are we getting involved?  We already offer a SUPER unique election of Wildflower Seeds and Herb Seeds that are bee-friendly.  We grow organic and plant for the bees in our own gardens.

FIRST, we are adding more Bee-Friendly SEEDS at Mary's Heirloom Seeds!  **Listed below**

Next, we are offering 50% OFF every single variety listed under FLOWERS.  Yes, you read that right.

50% off Flower Seeds now thru February 10th when you use code  BEES50  at checkout in the appropriate box.

How does it work?

CLICK HERE for our huge selection of flower seeds.  At checkout, find the box marked "discount"

Type in BEES50

in the box and click "apply" to automatically calculate your saving.  If you have trouble using our discount code, please send an email to mary@marysheirloomseeds.com and we can help you locate the appropriate box.

If you haven't read our article Plant for Pollinators and Increase Crop Yields then NOW is the time.  Not only are you helping the precious bee population by planting bee-friendly varieties, you can boost your crops!!!

NEW Seed varieties added today:

MIDNIGHT RED AMARANTH

 

RUSSIAN RIVER MERLOT AMARANTH

 

AUTUMN BEAUTY SUNFLOWER MIX

 

BLACK OIL SUNFLOWER

 

MAMMOTH GREY STRIPE SUNFLOWER

VELVET QUEEN SUNFLOWER



HAPPY PLANTING! 

 
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Bumble Bee Put on Endangered Species List Posted on 26 Jan 18:59 , 0 comments

Mary's Heirloom Seeds
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NEW for 2017 @MARY'S HEIRLOOM SEEDS
January 12, 2017
This popped up in my email yesterday and it's SO important that we decided to break from our regular scheduled email to share with you

If you have additional question, please ask

U.S. Puts Bumblebee On The Endangered Species List for the First Time    
This has been reported in multiple news outlets and scientific journals as of yesterday and even more this morning.

From NPR,
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has designated the rusty patched bumblebee an endangered species - the first such designation for a bumblebee and for a bee species in the continental U.S.
The protected status, which goes into effect on Feb. 10, includes requirements for federal protections and the development of a recovery plan. It also means that states with habitats for this species are eligible for federal funds.
"Today's Endangered Species listing is the best-and probably last-hope for the recovery of the rusty patched bumble bee," NRDC Senior Attorney Rebecca Riley said in a statement from the Xerces Society, which advocates for invertebrates. "Bumble bees are dying off, vanishing from our farms, gardens, and parks, where they were once found in great numbers."
Large parts of the Eastern and Midwestern United States were once crawling with these bees, Bombus affinis, but the bees have suffered a dramatic decline in the last two decades due to habitat loss and degradation, along with pathogens and pesticides.
Indeed, the bee was found in 31 states and Canadian provinces before the mid- to late-1990s, according to the final rule published in the Federal Register. But since 2000, it has been reported in only 13 states and Ontario, Canada. It has seen an 88 percent decline in the number of populations and an 87 percent loss in the amount of territory it inhabits.
This means the species is vulnerable to extinction, the rule says, even without further habitat loss or insecticide exposure. Canada designated the species as endangered in 2012.
The bees live in large colonies that can be made up of 1,000 individual workers. All types of the species have black heads, the rule states, "but only workers and males have a rusty reddish patch centrally located on the abdomen."
Habitat degradation may be particularly harmful to these bees because of their feeding habits, as described in the rule:
"The rusty patched bumble bee is one of the first bumble bees to emerge early in the spring and the last to go into hibernation, so to meet its nutritional needs, the species requires a constant and diverse supply of blooming flowers."
Last October, the Fish and Wildlife Service gave endangered status to seven species of yellow-faced bees native to Hawaii, the first time any U.S. bees received this kind of protection.

Pollinator decline is a global trend. A recent major global assessment sponsored by the U.N. suggested that about 40 percent of invertebrate pollinator species are facing extinction. Since some 75 percent of food crops rely at least partially on pollinators, that raises serious concerns about the future of the global food supply.
We can ALL try to do our part!     

How can we help?
1.  STOP spraying synthetic pesticides and even organic bee-killing pesticides around your yard and help your neighbors do the same

2.  Plant more flowers for hungry pollinators. 
****Please be aware that most of the "big box" nurseries sell chemically treated plants that will kill bees and other pollinators

3.  Leave the weeds!  Dandelions are beneficial flowers for bees and other pollinators

4.  Look for local honey!  Yum!  This supports beekeeping in your area.

5.  Bees get thirsty so we leave out a small dish in our beds for them to drink


Going organic is great but growing your own organic is even better!  In our own gardens, we take extra measures to ensure a thriving bee population.  Without bees, our gardens are pathetic!

To help YOU grow a healthy garden and help the bees, we've added 2 NEW varieties to our SEED SALE!

 
CORNFLOWER 
 
 
AFRICAN DAISY MIX 
 
Check out our selection of
WILDFLOWER SEEDS

These are just some of the bee-friendly plants
NEW for 2017  
If you have additional questions please feel free to ask. 

 

Happy Planting,

 

Mary's Heirloom Seeds, P. O. Box 3763, Ramona, CA 92065

Planting Wildflowers in FALL Posted on 23 Oct 08:09 , 0 comments

It's no secret, I love to plant seeds.  Wildflowers are a favorite since they add so much color to the garden and attract beneficial insects and beautiful pollinators.  Wondering what to plant in FALL?
 
Planting Time in Mild-Winter Areas
If you live in an area with minimal or no winter frosts (parts of California, Florida, southern Texas or parts of the South West) you can plant wildflowers any time, however, the hottest time of the year is not recommended. It is best to take advantage of the rains and plant in the fall when the rain begins. 

Planting Time in Cold-Zones
If you live in snow zones or areas with bitter-cold winters, it is best to wait and plant in the spring or some even say you can plant in fall. The advantage of planting in the fall is you will see those blooms earlier than if spring planted.
Fall Planting - Timing - best to wait until after a good hard frost. The seeds will not sprout until the spring when the soil has warmed up enough for germination.
 
Unless specifically buying a shade-loving mix, wildflowers like full sun. But they don’t like soggy, wet feet, so a good draining location is a must.
 
Give your pollinators a good food source and enjoy the long lasting blooms in your garden or backyard.
 
Just a few from our HUGE selection of pollinator-friendly varieties include
Plains Coreopsis


A few of my favorites include
"Save The Bees" Mix
Butterfly Garden Starter Kit
"Wild About Wildflowers" Combo Pack 
Edible Flowers Combo pack

 
We have an older article that I share over and over because it is still VERY relevant Plant for Pollinators and Increase Crop Yields

"Scientists concluded that an almond tree can compensate for the lack of nutrients and water in the short term by storing the nutrients and water in the fruits instead, but cannot compensate for insufficient pollination" 

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B is for Bachelor Button & BEES! Posted on 03 Oct 20:16 , 0 comments

The latest from Mary's Heirloom Seeds!
Mary's Heirloom Seeds
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VIDEOS:
 
October 3, 2016
We are SO EXCITED to announce a few new (to us)
heirloom seed varieties for 2017 and to share more organic gardening knowledge.

Don't miss out on our
99 Cent SEED SALE and more!
The sale ends October 5th

Below you'll find our latest about Bachelor Buttons and BEES.  Enjoy!
FREE
BACHELOR BUTTON SEEDS!   
 
You read that right!  We will be including a FREE pack of Bachelor Button seeds with every single purchase of $10 or more
now thru Sunday, October 9th

 
Bachelor Button 

Also called Cornflower, this attractive old-fashioned wildflower blooms in shades of blue, carmine, pink, and white that is quick and easy to grow. Frilly flowers sit atop multi-branching stems. Perfect cut flower that freely self-sows.
 
Don't miss out on this chance to stock up on several NEW for 2017 seed varieties and a few of our favorites!
Check out the *UPDATED* Seed Sale

 
I use Coconut Coir too! 

Coconut Coir Bricks are still available and stillon sale thru October 5th!    
Coconut coir growing medium comes from the coconut's fibrous husk (known as coir) that is bound together by lignin (known as pith). After the husk is immersed in water for 6 weeks, the fiber is extracted mechanically, and the pith is left behind as a waste product and stored in heaps to age. Since the pith comes from the fruit, it is quite naturally rich in nutrients. Coconut coir growing mediums are dehydrated and compressed into a compact form for easy handling.
BEE-FRIENDLY PLANTS  
 
Around our gardens, we plant extra for the Bees and the Butterflies!  I've written a few articles on our blog about the benefits of planting for the bees.

Identifying "Good Bugs"

Million Pollinator Garden Challenge

Plant for Pollinators & Increase Crop Yields


We posted the breaking news on our facebook page 
And from another source BEES In Peril

At Mary's Heirloom Seeds we offer quite a few varieties of bee-friendly Flowers and Herbs

A few of our favorites include

 
BORAGE 


 
BLACK EYED SUSAN 



 
ECHINACEA 


 
COSMOS 


 
LEMON BEE BALM 


 
LACY PHACELIA 



 
MINTLEAF BEE BALM 


 
PLAINS COREOPSIS 


 
ALL SUNFLOWERS 
This is just a small sampling of the tips, tutorials & videos available on our
Growing Tips & Videos Page


SEED Starting Info
We continue to add more tips, tutorials and videos every week.
If you have a specific request, please send us an email to
mary@marysheirloomseeds.com
If you have additional questions please feel free to ask. 
Happy Planting,
Mary's Heirloom Seeds, P. O. Box 3763, Ramona, CA 92065

Identifying Common "Good Bugs" in the Garden Posted on 06 Apr 14:05 , 0 comments

In case you missed it, we already posted about Identifying Common Garden Pests.  Now, we need to identify "Good Bugs" or insects in the garden and what they can help.  This isn't a complete list but it's a great place to start.



BEE

Honey bees can often be identified by the balls of yellow pollen they carry on the backs of their legs. Grow flowering plants. Encourage wild honey bees. Because the spread of mites and the increase in pesticide usage has seriously reduced honey bee populations, the wild honey bees that are left are even more important.


BUTTERFLY
 Butterflies are attracted to brightly colored, fragrant flowers and feed on nectar produced by the flowers. As the butterflies travel from one flower to another, they pollinate the plants, resulting in further development of plant species. Numerous plants rely on pollinators, such as butterflies, for reproduction.


DAMSEL BUG

Damsel bugs use thickened front legs to grab their prey, which includes aphids, caterpillars, thrips, leafhoppers, and other soft-bodied insects. Nymphs, too, are predators, and will feast both small insects and their eggs.


DRAGONFLY

There are more than 80 species of dragonflies. They can be identified by their long narrow body, their large compound eyes and the four transparent wings. There is variation in color. Sizes range from one to two inches. The larvae are found in water. They eat mosquitoes, aphids and other pest bugs



EARTHWORM
Earthworms are natural tillers of garden soil.  Earthworms naturally aerate the soil, an important component of any healthy loam. The air that is held by worm tunnels helps breakdown bacteria in the soil.  Earthworm excrement, called “castings,” acts as a soil conditioner, improving the porosity, moisture retention and overall quality of the soil. Castings also help bind important nutrients to plant roots and can deter pests and soil-borne diseases.



GREEN LACEWING

Lacewing feed mainly on flower nectar. Lacewing larvae, however, are voracious predators that feed on aphids, thrips, scales, moth eggs, small caterpillars and mites.


LADYBUGS (actually a beetle)

 Most ladybug adults and larvae feed on aphids and other soft-bodied insects. Adults are attracted to flower nectar and pollen, which they must eat before they can reproduce.


NEMATODE 
(yes, there are "good" and "bad" nematodes) 
(too small to see with the naked eye)

Beneficial Nematodes can be used anywhere developing pests exist including backyards, flower and vegetable gardens, lawns, fruit and nut trees, vines, greenhouses, row crops, pastures and more


SPIDERS

All spiders feed on insects and are very important in preventing pest outbreaks. The spiders normally found in gardens do not move indoors, nor are they poisonous. Permanent perennial plantings and straw mulches will provide shelter and dramatically increase spider populations in vegetable gardens. 

Helpful links




Stay tuned for more info during our 2016 Organic Pest Control series!



We hope you have enjoyed yet another informative growing article here at Mary's Heirloom Seeds.  If you have additional questions please ask!

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SAVE THE BEES GIVEAWAY Posted on 07 Feb 18:19 , 27 comments

We are THRILLED to sponsor another Giveaway at Mary's Heirloom Seeds.  As promised, now that we've reached 8,000 followers on our facebook page, we're ready to give away SEEDS!!!  You have a chance to win 1 of 2 organic BEE FRIENDLY Seed Combo Packs from Mary's Heirloom Seeds.

-"Wild About Wildflowers" Seeds Combo Pack

-*NEW* Edible Flowers Combo Pack

A total of 2 winners will be chosen!!!
This giveaway is LIVE Sunday, February 7th and ends 
Friday, February 12th at 11:59pm
About our prizes.... 

-"Wild About Wildflowers" seed combo pack
Includes 6 varieties of individually packed Wildflower seeds
NEW Seeds for this combo pack!

-French Marigold
-Bachelor Button
-Butterfly Garden
-Queen Anne's Lace
-Yarrow
-Zinnia Mix



-Edible Flowers seed combo pack

Includes 6 varieties of individually packed EDIBLE Flower varieties!
A unique mix of medicinal herbs and companion plant!
-Borage
-Calendula
-Nasturtium
-Purple Coneflower (Echinacea)
-Plains Coreopsis
-Yarrow
 

About Mary's Heirloom Seeds,
Mary's Heirloom Seeds is a "mom and pop" small business created out of a desire to help people become more sustainable and self-sufficient. Our customers know that we are a simple phone call or email away

We currently offer over 300 varieties of open-pollinated, non-gmo & non-hybrid, non-patented,  untreated, organic, heirloom garden seeds.   Mary has signed the Safe Seed pledge.  
Most orders place Monday-Thursday ship within 48 hours, except for Holidays.
Order herb and veggie varieties together and get an extra free seed pack!
*$10 Order Minimum on all seed orders*

From our seed pack envelopes to our labels and packaging material, all of our paper comes from post-consumer recycled material. We hand-pack, print and label all of our own seed packages. Our website is hosted with a wind-powered, sustainable company. 


Are you ready to enter the giveaway?


Giveaway is open to all Residents of the US and Canada.
Giveaway opens 2/7/2016 and ends Friday, February 12th at Midnight.
All giveaway entrants will be added to Mary's Heirloom Seeds mailing list.
Your information is never sold and we never send spam emails.


a Rafflecopter giveaway

MILLION POLLINATOR GARDEN CHALLENGE Posted on 07 Jan 16:53 , 3 comments

JOIN US in the Million Pollinator Garden Challenge!  Have you heard of the challenge?  

Mary's Heirloom Seeds is joining National Pollinator Garden Network CHALLENGE.  NPGN collectively represents approximately 800,000 gardeners, 10,000 schoolyard gardens and bring a baseline of a 250,000 registered pollinator gardens nationwide from across its five main founding organizations.
CALIFORNIA POPPY
The Million Pollinator Garden Challenge (MPGC) is a nationwide call to action to preserve and create gardens and landscapes that help revive the health of bees, butterflies, birds, bats and other pollinators across America. We will move millions of individuals, kids and families outdoors and make a connection between pollinators and the healthy food people eat.
The focus of the NPGN is: to inspire individuals and community groups, institutions and the garden industry to create more pollinator habitat through sustainable gardening practices, habitat conservation and provide these groups the tools to be successful.
FRENCH MARIGOLDS
So how are we getting involved?  We already offer a SUPER unique election of Wildflower Seeds and Herb Seeds that are bee-friendly.  We grow organic and plant for the bees in our own gardens.
 
FIRST, we are adding more Bee-Friendly SEEDS at Mary's Heirloom Seeds.  Next, we are giving away FREE SEEDS!  During the entire month of January we will include a free pack of bee-friendly seeds.  
BONUS, all orders place in January *$10 order minimum* will be entered into a drawing for a $15 gift certificate to Mary's Heirloom Seeds
If you haven't read our article Plant for Pollinators and Increase Crop Yields then NOW is the time.  Not only are you helping the precious bee population by planting bee-friendly varieties, you can boost your crops!!!
BORAGE is a bee-friendly herb and great companion to Tomatoes
How do YOU get involved?
Plant a Pollinator-Friendly "patch."  This can be a small area or a huge plot.  Every little bit counts.
-Stop using synthetic chemical pesticides in your yard and gardens
-Grow/Use plant varieties that provide nectar and pollen sources
-Provide a water source
-Establish continuous blooms throughout the season.  You can do this by staggering your planting by 2-4 week intervals.
-Create large "pollinator targets" of native or non-invasive plants
-Plan your pollinator garden in a sunny spot, preferably with a wind-break
 
Over the next few days I'll post a bit more about pollinators and bee-friendly gardening tips.
ECHINACEA (also known as coneflower) is another great pollinator-friendly herb
We offer a few combo packs...
"Flower Power" Herb Combo Pack - "Wild About Wildflowers" Check it out!!!

HELPFUL LINKS:

Companion Planting Guide
For more info on what to plant in your area, we have a region-specific

2016 Planting Guide for the US

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Plant for Pollinators and Increase Crop Yields Posted on 05 Jul 19:57 , 0 comments

Are you READY???

What's the Big Deal about BEES?

 

Have you heard about CCD or Colony Collapse Disorder? "Colony collapse disorder (CCD) is a phenomenon in which worker bees from a beehive or European honey bee colony abruptly disappear. While such disappearances have occurred throughout the history of apiculture, the term colony collapse disorder was first applied to a drastic rise in the number of disappearances of Western honey bee colonies in North America in late 2006. Colony collapse is significant because many agricultural crops worldwide are pollinated by bees."
English Lavender
One possible theory...
Honeybee Deaths Linked to Corn Insecticide:
 
New research shows a link between an increase in the death of bees and insecticides, specifically the chemicals used to coat corn seeds.    Source

Read A World Without Bees for info on foods that require pollination.

From a customer,   "Monarch Butterflies are about the be placed on the Endangered Species list (thanks Monsanto!).  If we all bought at least one package of these (Milkweed) with every order maybe we could help."
TROPICAL MILKWEED
AWESOME idea!!!  Mary's Heirloom Seeds wants to help save the BEES and the BUTTERFLIES! 
We always include a free pack of bee-friendly seeds with orders!

**Minimum $10 Order with free shipping on heirloom seeds within the 50 United States and US Territories**

We found a helpful article: 

 Pollinators More important to Crop Yields than Fertilizer

"The critical importance of pollinators is exemplified in a recent study out of the University of California, Berkeley. Not only do pollinators help increase crop yields, they may be even more important than fertilizers, according to the study suggests."

 

"Scientists concluded that an almond tree can compensate for the lack of nutrients and water in the short term by storing the nutrients and water in the fruits instead, but cannot compensate for insufficient pollination" 

 

Ecologist Alexandra-Maria Klein, Ph.D. and her colleagues at UC Berkeley found that when there is a lack of pollination, via bees and other pollinators, there is a stronger reduction in harvest yields than when there is a lack of either fertilizer or sufficient water for the crops. Their results, which were published in the journals Plant Biology and PLoS ONE, found that when crops were pollinated, the plants bear more fruit along with a change in their nutrient content.


What to Plant and WHY?

 

The simplest way to increase crop yields is to encourage pollinators to your garden.  It's simple to do, easy to grow and eco-friendly.

 

BASIL and BORAGE produce flowers and are both companion plants for Tomatoes, Peppers, Squash and Eggplant.

 

Marigold is another companion plant AND it deters nematodes!

 

MILKWEED is the perfect addition if you're looking to attract Bees and Butterflies.

 

HERBS: Lavender, Lemon Bee Balm, Anise Hyssop, Caraway, Chives, Chamomile and Yarrow are all Flowering Herbs and what I call "Double Duty Herbs."  These "double duty" varieties encourage pollinators to your garden AND are useful in herbal home remedies as well as home-cooking recipes.   

 

SUNFLOWERS are an excellent addition to your garden for the bees and other pollinators.  For multiple flowers, try Mexican Sunflower!

 

Nasturtium is another edible flower that attracts pollinators.  Pretty flowers with a delicious flavor!  As a companion plant, Nasturtium deters Squash Vine Borers! 

 

 

For a detailed list, read  

COMPANION PLANTING 

 
Have you seed our VIDEOS?
Many of you have asked for information we have been sharing during our free workshops in our local community.  Check out these links!

 


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