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More Info on Herbs, Growing & Recipes Posted on 9 Oct 07:36 , 0 comments

Our latest e-newsletter is PACKED with info on Herbs,
Herbal Remedies and Special Offers.  Check it out!

Mary's Heirloom Seeds
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October 8, 2015
It's been another busy week with questions ranging from Organic Plant food to growing and using herbs.
We've added several new seed combo packs including the Back to Basic Homestead pack, FALL Garden Pack and the Fall SUPER Garden pack.
Today we're adding another!  We also have a great deal on Mary's Organic Sprouting Kits.  
Complete details below.  Enjoy!
ABOUT HERBS   
I've shared quite a few articles about the benefits of specific herbs on my personal blog and I'm (slowly) adding them to our new blog at Mary's Heirloom Seeds.  Check out these helpful links for more information on Herbs, Herbal remedies and DIY Tinctures
Herbal Kits    
We offer several unique options for 
There are many ways to use herbs for medicinal purposes and one of the is in a tincture.
An herbal tincture is simply an herbal extract.  Herbal remedies have been used throughout history to treat illnesses and ailments without "modern medicine" and pharmaceuticals.  Tinctures are easy to make, home remedies.  If properly prepared and stored, your tincture can last indefinitely.  Continue Reading

Special Offers this week are perfectly timed!
It's best to make these immune boosting herbal remedies before everyone around you starts to get sick!!!



DIY TINCTURE KITS INCLUDE:
1-32 OUNCE GLASS JAR WITH LID, 1- 2 OUNCE AMBER BOTTLE WITH DROPPER TOP, 2 CUSTOMIZED LABELS, 1 OUNCE OF ORGANIC HERB OF YOUR CHOICE (ADDITIONAL HERBS AVAILABLE) AND DETAILS INSTRUCTIONS
NEW Herb Variety   
Added today at Mary's Heirloom Seeds
You can grow Horehound seeds and use the perennial herb plant in your own soothing teas, or if you are adventurous, in your own homemade candy.
Homesteader's Herb Packs    
Since we added the Back to Basics Homestead pack, we decided to offer 2 Homestead Herbal Packs.
Comfrey, Echinacea, Calendula, German Chamomile, Lemonbalm, Mugwort, Oregano, Peppermint and Yarrow
Arnica, Thai Basil, Calendula, Comfrey, Echinacea, Fennel, German Chamomile, Lavender, Lemonbalm, Mugwort, Oregano, Peppermint, Rosemary, Sage, Toothache Plant and Yarrow.
We offer smaller Herb Combo packs including
SALE on Mary's Organic Sprouting Kits thru 10/15/15    
NEW OPTIONS!  
Choose from 2, 8 or 16 ounces of Organic Seeds with your Sprouting kit AND SAVE!
Special available thru 10/15/15

Also ON SALE thru Friday 10/10/15
Save on 1, 2 & 3 pound options!





GET FREE SEEDS WITH YOUR PURCHASE!

Get and EXTRA pack of free seeds when you purchase Coconut Coir Pellets!
If you have additional questions please feel free to ask. 
Happy Planting,

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DIY Thai Basil Tincture Recipe Posted on 19 Aug 08:06 , 2 comments

Making your own herbal home remedies is easy.  Herbal tea is a great start but Tinctures can a much stronger alternative.  The cost to purchase 2 ounces in the store is almost 4 times what it would cost to make your own.  Some are even 7 times more expensive!  Source

You might enjoy reading Boost Your Health with Organic Herbs

From Getting Started with Herbal Remedies

What is a Tincture?
An herbal tincture is simply an herbal extract.  Herbal remedies have been used throughout history to treat illnesses and ailments without "modern medicine" and pharmaceuticals.  Tinctures are easy to make, home remedies.  If properly prepared and stored, your tincture will last indefinitely.


What are the benefits of Thai Holy Basil?
Basil, especially as an extract or oil, is known to have exceptionally powerful antioxidant properties that can protect the body from premature aging, common skin issues, age-related problems and even some types of cancer. The herb also contains the flavonoids, orientin and vicenin, which are plant pigments that shield your cell structures from oxygen and radiation damage.

Both fresh basil and basil oil have strong antibacterial capabilities. In fact, basil has been shown to stop the growth of many bacteria, even some that had grown resistant to other antibiotics. Basil can be applied to wounds to help prevent bacterial infections.

In Ayurvedic medicine, Holy Basil is used as a tea or a tincture. Among its many medicinal uses are lowering cholesterol, as an immune booster, and lowering blood glucose levels.  Source

 
To get started you'll need:  A clean jar with a lid, vodka or everclear, herb(s), measuring cups and/or scale and labels.  
If you purchase a DIY Tincture Kit from Mary's Heirloom Seeds, the herbs, jar with a lid. labels and dropper bottle are all included.  All you need to do is measure out your menstruum and combine!

Let's get started making our Tincture!

DIY Organic Thai Holy Basil Tincture
Ingredients and tools:
1 clean jar with a lid (quart size)
5-6 cups of vodka or everclear
1 ounce of organic Thai Holy Basil

Directions:
1.  Start with a cleaned and sterilized glass jar. Place organic Thai Holy Basil in your jar.
2.  Measure out 3-4 cups of vodka or other menstruum and place inside your jar.
*If you choose to use ACV or Vegetable Glycerin, be aware that your Tincture will have a limited shelf life of approx 6 months*
3. Place the lid back on your jar and mix thoroughly.
4. Label your homemade Tincture with the Date and Ingredients.
5. Store in a cool dry place such as a kitchen cabinet
*Shake your brewing tincture regularly.  I prefer to shake my tinctures 2-3 times per week.*

**Always label your jars and dropper bottles with ingredients and dates**

Start straining and consuming Basil Tincture after 4-6 weeks.
I take approx 1/2 teaspoon up to 3 times daily for approx 3 weeks.

Disclaimer: All information is intended for your general knowledge only and is not a substitute for medical advice or treatment for specific medical conditions. We cannot and do not give you medical advice. You should seek prompt medical care for any specific health issues and consult your physician before consuming any product(s).  

Just a few of my Homemade Tinctures!
We've added NEW Organic dried herbs for purchase @ 
Mary's Heirloom Seeds. Our DIY Tincture Kits are a great place to start!
 

 

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About Indian Strawberry Posted on 19 Aug 07:23 , 1 comment

There's been quite a buzzzzz over our latest additions here at Mary's Heirloom Seeds. 

Last week we added Dill Bouquet, Wild Strawberry and Indian Strawberry.

 

Indian Strawberry is considered a "mock strawberry" because it isn't actually a strawberry.

From Eat The Weeds,  "On first glance the P. indica looks like you have found yourself a brilliantly red, juicy strawberry. And that is probably the public relations problem P. indica has. It’s not what people expect so a lot of commentators dismiss it as worthless, but that’s a bit unfair. The fruit is 3.4% sugar, 1.5% protein and 1.6% ash. It has 6.3 mg of Vitamin C per 100 ml of juice.  An eight-foot patch will produce about 5.5 ounces fruit annually, about the same as wild strawberries, and you can cook the leaves as a green. Some folks think the fruit has a hint of watermelon flavor. Others say it is sour so there may be some genetic diversity there, either in the plant or our taste buds. There is certainly no harm adding some of the plant to your wilderness stew."

 

From Bellarmine University, "The entire plant is medicinal as an anticoagulant, antiseptic, depurative (purifier) and febrifuge (fever reducer). The herb can be used for stomatitis (an inflammation of the mucus lining), laryngitis, and acute tonsillitis. The fresh leaves can be crushed and applied externally as a medicinal poultice, a soft and moist mass. It is used in the treatment of boils and absesses, burns, weeping eczema, ringworm, snake and insect bites and traumatic injuries. A decoction of the leaves is medicinal and used in the treatment of swellings. An infusion, or liquid extract, of the flowers is used to activate the blood circulation. The Indian Strawberry can also cure skin diseases. In folklore it is said that in India it is to be used as an offering to the gods. The Wild Indian Strawberry is used extensively in China as a medicinal herb, and is being studied for its ability to stop the HIV virus and some forms of cancer from spreading through the body. "

So how do we grow Indian Strawberry?

Start Strawberry seeds for this rare ground cover plant that will get lots of attention! It is an Indian Strawberry plant with lovely yellow blooms, and it produces small red Strawberries all summer long on a creeping evergreen carpet. Indian Strawberry is well-suited for hanging over a wall or as a ground cover plant. Indian Strawberry ground cover is naturalized throughout the United States, and it is found growing in shady places in woods and grassy slopes. Indian Strawberry prefers a moist, but well-drained soil in a partially sunny position. Once Indian Strawberry plants are established, the matted root sends out runners to set new plants. Indian Strawberry leaves are light green and finely haired. Indian Strawberry flowers are small, yellow, and are 5 petaled. They first appear in April and will bloom throughout the summer until fall. The fruit is small, about 1/2 inch round. It is edible, but many say the taste is not noteworthy. Birds, however, love the red fruit. Another common name for this variety is Mock Strawberry ground cover.

For most of the US:  Sow the Strawberry seeds from January to April indoors. Use quality seed starter mix, and small pots or starter trays. Sow the Wild Strawberry ground cover seeds on the surface and press the seed into the mix. Keep the soil damp but not wet, and seal the starter tray or pots inside a plastic bag until after germination. When the Strawberry seedlings are large enough to handle, transplant them into 3 inch pots, and grow them on in cooler conditions until large enough to plant outdoors. After all danger of frost has passed, harden the young Wild Strawberry plants over a period of 7 - 10 days before planting outdoors in their permanent location.

For Florida growers: Plant strawberries  during the fall months--late September through October. Flower and berry growth begins in November; the harvest generally takes place in the months of April and May. 

 


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DIY Feverfew Tincture Tutorial Posted on 10 Aug 16:48 , 0 comments

Making your own herbal home remedies is easy.  Herbal tea is a great start but Tinctures can be a much stronger alternative.  The cost to purchase 2 ounces in the store is almost 4 times what it would cost to make your own.  Some are even 7 times more expensive!  Source

You might enjoy reading Fight Viruses with Organic Herbs & Food 

From Getting Started with Herbal Remedies

What is a Tincture?
An herbal tincture is simply an herbal extract. Herbal remedies have been used throughout history to treat illnesses and ailments without "modern medicine" and pharmaceuticals. Tinctures are easy to make, home remedies. If properly prepared and stored, your tincture will last indefinitely.



What are the benefits of Feverfew?
The word "feverfew" derives from the Latin word febrifugia, meaning "fever reducer."
Feverfew is used most often today to treat migraine headaches.
Feverfew has also be used for Asthma, Arthritis, Psoriasis, digestion and Menstrual cramps.

Feverfew is believed to aid digestion and lower blood pressure.  Long history of using leaves for fevers, menstrual cramps, and migraine headaches. Source
 


From Mary's Heirloom Seeds 
Compact, spreading growth up to 3-feet tall with small yellow centered white daisylike flowers.

To get started you'll need:  A clean jar with a lid, vodka or everclear, herb(s), measuring cups and/or scale and labels.  
If you purchase a DIY Tincture Kit from Mary's Heirloom Seeds, the herbs, jar with a lid, labels and dropper bottle are all included.  All you need to do is measure out your menstruum and combine! 

Let's get started making our Tincture!

DIY Organic Feverfew Tincture
Ingredients and tools:
1 clean jar with a lid (quart size)
3-5 cups of organic vodka or everclear
1 ounce of organic, dried Feverfew

Directions:
1.  Start with a cleaned and sterilized glass jar. Place organic Feverfew in your jar.
2.  Measure out 3-4 cups of vodka or other menstruum and place inside your jar.
*If you choose to use ACV or Vegetable Glycerin, be aware that your Tincture will have a limited shelf life of approx 6 months*
3. Place the lid back on your jar and mix thoroughly.
4. Label your homemade Tincture with the Date and Ingredients.
4. Store in a cool dry place such as a kitchen cabinet
*Shake your brewing tincture regularly.  I prefer to shake my tinctures 2-3 times per week.*

Start straining and consuming Feverfew Tincture after 4-6 weeks.
I take 1/2-1 teaspoon of tincture in water as needed.  


Disclaimer: All information is intended for your general knowledge only and is not a substitute for medical advice or treatment for specific medical conditions. We cannot and do not give you medical advice. You should seek prompt medical care for any specific health issues and consult your physician before consuming any product(s).  
Just a few of my Homemade Tinctures!
We've added NEW Organic dried herbs for purchase @ 

Stay tuned for more DIY Tincture Tutorials

 

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DIY "Allergy" Tincture Recipe Posted on 10 Aug 16:15 , 0 comments

Another recipe for alternative "medicine."

For my allergy tincture I use a special blend from Mary's Heirloom Seeds DIY Tincture Kit.   It is an herbal combination which can be used as a tea, infusion or tincture.  Our DIY Allergy Kit include: organic Nettle leaf, organic Fennel seed, organic Lemongrass, organic Spearmint leaf, organic Eyebright, organic Calendula flowers, organic Peppermint leaf, organic Red Clover herb and blossoms, organic Lavender flowers, organic Blue Vervain, and organic Stevia leaf.

"Allergy" Mixed herbs

I won't get into the specific properties of each herb but I can tell you that, used as tea, it is wonderfully minty and works well for seasonal allergy relief.  

 

Making your own herbal home remedies is easy. Herbal tea is a great start but Tinctures can a much stronger alternative. The cost to purchase 2 ounces in the store is almost 4 times what it would cost to make your own. Some are even 7 times more expensive! Source

You might enjoy reading Boost Your Health with Organic Herbs

From Getting Started with Herbal Remedies

What is a Tincture?
An herbal tincture is simply an herbal extract. Herbal remedies have been used throughout history to treat illnesses and ailments without "modern medicine" and pharmaceuticals. Tinctures are easy to make, home remedies. If properly prepared and stored, your tincture will last indefinitely.



Homemade Allergy Tincture
Tincture at 2 weeks
Ingredients:
1 ounce Allergy herbal mix (dry herbs)
3 cups organic vodka (or vegetable glycerin)
For a stronger tincture use less alcohol
*DO NOT use rubbing alcohol*

Directions:
1. Start with a cleaned and sterilized glass jar. Place organic Ginger in your jar.
2. Measure out 3 cups of vodka or other menstruum and place inside your jar.
*If you choose to use ACV or Vegetable Glycerin, be aware that your Tincture will have a limited shelf life of approx 6 months*
3. Place the lid back on your jar and mix thoroughly.
4. Label your homemade Tincture with the Date and Ingredients.

5. Store in a cool, dry place such as a kitchen cabinet. Keep Tinctures our of direct light
*Shake your brewing tincture regularly. I prefer to shake my tinctures 2-3 times per week, sometimes daily.*

Tincture is ready in 4-6 weeks, strain out herbs and place in a darker jar or leave in a dark place (cabinet). 
Dosage for Adults: 1 - 2 ml, two times daily
Disclaimer: All information is intended for your general knowledge only and is not a substitute for medical advice or treatment for specific medical conditions. We cannot and do not give you medical advice. You should seek prompt medical care for any specific health issues and consult your physician before consuming any product(s).

I just added a new combo pack...
"Flower Power" Herb Combo Pack - Check it out!!!



 

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DIY Organic Ginger Tincture Posted on 10 Aug 06:35 , 0 comments

Making your own herbal home remedies is easy. Herbal tea is a great start but Tinctures can a much stronger alternative. The cost to purchase 2 ounces in the store is almost 4 times what it would cost to make your own. Some are even 7 times more expensive! Source

You might enjoy reading Boost Your Health with Organic Herbs

From Getting Started with Herbal Remedies

What is a Tincture?
An herbal tincture is simply an herbal extract. Herbal remedies have been used throughout history to treat illnesses and ailments without "modern medicine" and pharmaceuticals. Tinctures are easy to make, home remedies. If properly prepared and stored, your tincture will last indefinitely.


What are the benefits of GINGER?
Ginger (Zingiber officinale) has scientific backing as an anti-nausea agent. It may offer other benefits to those stricken with infections diarrhea. Alcohol extracts of ginger are active against bacteria that infect the intestinal tract (Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli, Vibrio cholerae Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Helicobacter pylori), skin and other soft tissues (Staphylococcus aureus), and respiratory tract (Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae). Ginger has antifungal activity against the yeast Candida albicans. It also discourages intestinal worms. Because studies have shown that heat deactivates the antibacterial effect, it may be best to consume ginger raw, or in tincture or capsule form. Source


To get started you'll need: A clean jar with a lid, Menstruum: ACV, vegetable glycerin, vodka or everclear, herb(s), measuring cups and/or scale and labels.
If you purchase a DIY Tincture Kit from Mary's Heirloom Seeds, the herbs, jar with a lid. labels and dropper bottle are all included. All you need to do is measure out your menstruum and combine!

Let's get started making our Tincture!

DIY Organic Ginger Tincture
Ingredients and tools:
1 clean jar with a lid (quart size)
 3 cups of liquid (ACV, Vegetable glycerin, vodka or everclear)
1 ounce of organic Ginger Root (dried)

**Always label your jars and dropper bottles with ingredients and dates**

Directions:
1. Start with a cleaned and sterilized glass jar. Place organic Ginger in your jar.
2. Measure out 3 cups of vodka or other menstruum and place inside your jar.
*If you choose to use ACV or Vegetable Glycerin, be aware that your Tincture will have a limited shelf life of approx 6 months*
3. Place the lid back on your jar and mix thoroughly.
4. Label your homemade Tincture with the Date and Ingredients.

5. Store in a cool, dry place such as a kitchen cabinet. Keep Tinctures our of direct light
*Shake your brewing tincture regularly. I prefer to shake my tinctures 2-3 times per week, sometimes daily.*

Start straining and consuming Ginger Tincture after 4-6 weeks. I prefer to store strained tinctures in amber dropper bottles.
I take approx 1/2 teaspoon up to 3 times daily as needed.

Disclaimer: All information is intended for your general knowledge only and is not a substitute for medical advice or treatment for specific medical conditions. We cannot and do not give you medical advice. You should seek prompt medical care for any specific health issues and consult your physician before consuming any product(s).
Just a few of my Homemade Tinctures!
We've added NEW Organic dried herbs for purchase @

Stay tuned for more DIY Tincture Tutorials.

 

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Make Your Own Herbal Remedies and Save Posted on 5 Aug 10:00 , 0 comments

It's another beautiful day here.  The air is cool and crisp.  The sun is shining and life is good! 
Today I'm talking Tinctures!  

In our house, we use tinctures first for every-day ailments.  We have had such great success using herbal home remedies instead of OTC "stuff" so let's chat!

What is a Tincture?
From our recent article Getting Started with Herbal Remedies
There are many ways to use herbs for medicinal purposes and one is in a tincture. Other uses include consuming in food, salves, herbal vinegar and herbal oils, teas and even syrup. I thought I would start with Tinctures because it is quite simple and easy to use.
An herbal tincture is simply an herbal extract. Herbal remedies have been used throughout history to treat illnesses and ailments without "modern medicine" and pharmacueticals. Tinctures are easy to make, home remedies. If properly prepared and stored, your tincture will last indefinitely.


Why DIY Tinctures?

Now for the bottom line...saving money!  If you look at your local "health food store" you will find tinctures.  Most are $10-$40 per ounce.  Online it is the same story plus shipping.  Pictured is a special "kit" I put together to get started on your tincture.

Our DIY Tincture Kits include 

1-32 ounce glass jar with lid, 1- 2 ounce Amber bottle with dropper top, 2 customizeable labels, 1 ounce of Organic Herb of your choice (additional herbs available) and Details Instructions

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Earlier this month I purchased a large bottle of 100 proof vodka for $17.  That's approx 59 ounces. 

1-2 ounces of herbs and16-32 ounces of vodka and I still have more vodka left.


Let's do the math
Tincture Kit (1 oz of herb) from Mary's Shop $15.75
Priority mail shipping $7.99

24 ounces (3 cups) of 100 proof vodka (approx)  $6.91


Total spent for 24 ounces of Tincture  $30.65
Homemade: Total spent for 2 ounces $2.55


Online store selling 1 ounce of Chamomile Tincture  $11.00
Shipping $4
Store-Bought: Total for 2 ounces: $26

HUGE savings!!!  Plus, with the Tincture Kit you have the Jar, Strainer top and detailed Instructions to make more! Kits ship within 48 hours (except weekends and holidays) via Priority Mail.

Not sure about the alcohol contentThe alcohol in a tincture can be evaporated out by adding the drops to almost boiling water and swirling until cool. Although a vegetable glycerin or Apple Cider Vinegar based tincture has a short shelf life, it can be used instead of alcohol for those who prefer an alternative.

Make your own Tincture using Mary's Organic DIY Tincture Kits.

So far, we have shared tutorials for Echinacea Tincture and Getting Started.  Every Tincture Kit purchased thru Mary's Heirloom Seeds includes detailed instructions.  Tinctures are simple to make and as we've shown above, much less expensive compared to store-bought.

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DIY Echinacea Tincture Tutorial Posted on 5 Aug 07:42 , 0 comments

Making your own herbal home remedies is easy.  Herbal tea is a great start but Tinctures can a much stronger alternative.  The cost to purchase 2 ounces in the store is almost 4 times what it would cost to make your own.  Some are even 7 times more expensive!  Source

You might enjoy reading Boost Your Health with Organic Herbs

From Getting Started with Herbal Remedies 

What is a Tincture?
An herbal tincture is simply an herbal extract.  Herbal remedies have been used throughout history to treat illnesses and ailments without "modern medicine" and pharmaceuticals.  Tinctures are easy to make, home remedies.  If properly prepared and stored, your tincture will last indefinitely.


What are the benefits of Echinacea?
Echinacea is a classic member of the antiviral herbs. Not only does it fight viral and bacterial infection, it also stimulates the white blood cells and is good for the immune system. Use both the leaves and the roots of this plant.  Source

 
To get started you'll need:  A clean jar with a lid, vodka or everclear, herb(s), measuring cups and/or scale and labels.  
If you purchase a DIY Tincture Kit from Mary's Heirloom Seeds, the herbs, jar with a lid. labels and dropper bottle are all included.  All you need to do is measure out your menstruum and combine!

Let's get started making our Tincture!

DIY Organic Echinacea Tincture
Ingredients and tools:
1 clean jar with a lid (quart size)
5-6 cups of liquid  (ACV, Vegetable glycerin, vodka or everclear)
1 ounce of organic Echinacea Root (dried)

**Always label your jars and dropper bottles with ingredients and dates**

Directions:
1.  Start with a cleaned and sterilized glass jar. Place organic Echinacea in your jar.
2.  Measure out 3-4 cups of vodka or other menstruum and place inside your jar.
*If you choose to use ACV or Vegetable Glycerin, be aware that your Tincture will have a limited shelf life of approx 6 months*
3. Place the lid back on your jar and mix thoroughly.
4. Label your homemade Tincture with the Date and Ingredients.

5. Store in a cool, dry place such as a kitchen cabinet.  Keep Tinctures our of direct light
*Shake your brewing tincture regularly.  I prefer to shake my tinctures 2-3 times per week, sometimes daily.*

Start straining and consuming Echinacea Tincture after 4-6 weeks.  I prefer to store strained tinctures in amber dropper bottles.
I take approx 1/2 teaspoon up to 3 times daily as needed.

Disclaimer: All information is intended for your general knowledge only and is not a substitute for medical advice or treatment for specific medical conditions. We cannot and do not give you medical advice. You should seek prompt medical care for any specific health issues and consult your physician before consuming any product(s).  
Just a few of my Homemade Tinctures!
We've added NEW Organic dried herbs for purchase @ 

Stay tuned for more DIY Tincture Tutorials.

 

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Getting Started with Herbal Remedies Posted on 3 Aug 15:45 , 0 comments

YARROW, A great herb for Women's Health
In case you missed the very first post in our Herbal Series, check out

 

There are many ways to use herbs for medicinal purposes and one of the is in a tincture. Other uses include consuming in food, salves, herbal vinegar and herbal oils, teas and even syrup. I thought I would start with Tinctures because it is quite simple and easy to use.

There are 2 important components to your herbal tincture: Herbal material and menstruum

Our DIY Organic Tincture Kits include everything but the liquid!


What is Menstruum?
Definition: a substance that dissolves a solid or holds it in suspension : solvent
Types of Menstruum is general vodka, when making a true herbal tincture. Vinegar can be used, it can be safer than alcohol, but is less effective at leaching out the medicinal components of the plant. When tincturing dried herbs, water is sometimes mixed with the vodka or alcohol. When tincturing fresh herbs, I always use high-proof alcohol.

An herbal tincture is simply an herbal extract. Herbal remedies have been used throughout history to treat illnesses and ailments without "modern medicine" and pharmacueticals. Tinctures are easy to make, home remedies. If properly prepared and stored, your tincture will last indefinitely.

 

How long will an Herbal Tincture last?

First, if you choose to use Vinegar, Apple Cider vinegar or Vegetable glycerin, your tincture will have a shelf life of approximately 6-8 months.

All tinctures should be stored in a cool, dry, dark place. A kitchen cabinet away from the oven or stove works perfect.

According to my research, properly made tinctures with high-proof alcohol do not go bad. Again, if prepared and stored properly.

A few of my favorites: Cayenne, Feverfew, Chamomile and Thai Holy Basil

Just a few fresh DIY Tinctures

The best way to use liquid herbal tinctures is to put the suggested amount in a glass of water, tea, or juice and drink the entire contents. You can just consume straight but some tinctures can be a little stout or spicy (like the cayenne).

Single herb tinctures use only 1 herb variety. Combination tinctures are a blend of specific herbs used for a specific purpose. I've made over 15 types of herbal tinctures and I continue to make new varieties every month. Each herb or herbal combination can be used for different ailments or health boosting properties.

We offer several different kits at Mary's Heirloom Seeds

All of our kits include:

1-32 ounce glass jar with lid, 1- 2 ounce Amber bottle with dropper top, 2 customized labels, 1 ounce of Organic Herb of your choice (additional herbs available) and Details Instructions

Have you seen our Organic DIY Tincture Kits?
Allergy Tincture is very popular
Mugwort Tincture for migraines and menstrual complaints
GINGER is a great anti-inflammatory

 

 

 

Stay tuned for herb-specific Tincture information including recipes!

 


I hope you have enjoyed another educational article.  If you have additional questions, please leave a comment below or send an email to mary@marysheirloomseeds.com

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Boost Your Health with Organic Herbs Posted on 14 Jul 04:36 , 0 comments

With Fall on the way and Winter around the corner, NOW is the time to keep yourself healthy and boost your body's immune system.  Giving your body the proper nutrients to allow the body to heal naturally is the simplest way to avoid harsh and sometimes harmful pharmaceuticals.  

I am in no way implying that you throw out your prescriptions and go totally herbal.  This is not intended as medical advice but as a tool to help boost your immune system and to assist your body in the healing process.
Organic Cayenne Powder

Powerful Herbs to Fight Viruses

ALOE
Not only is this one of the more helpful herbs for fighting viruses, this can also work as an astringent and has antifungal and antibacterial properties. Taken internally, it is good for easing the symptoms of AIDS and for digestive disorders. Use only the pulp from the inside of the succulent leaves of the aloe plant.
Astragalus, a mighty member of the bean family, has been shown to boost the immune system and inhibit certain viruses, such as the Cocksackie B virus. It enjoys a long history of preventing and treating colds and various other respiratory-related conditions.
Basil, especially as an extract or oil, is known to have exceptionally powerful antioxidant properties that can protect the body from premature aging, common skin issues, age-related problems and even some types of cancer. The herb also contains the flavonoids orientin and vicenin, which are plant pigments that shield your cell structures from oxygen and radiation damage.
Both fresh basil and basil oil have strong antibacterial capabilities. In fact, basil has been shown to stop the growth of many bacteria, even some that had grown resistant to other antibiotics. Basil can be applied to wounds to help prevent bacterial infections.
In Ayurvedic medicine, Holy Basil is used as a tea or a tincture. Among its many medicinal uses are lowering cholesterol, as an immune booster, and lowering blood glucose levels
Cayenne pepper's bright red color signals its high content of beta-carotene or pro-vitamin A. Just two teaspoons of cayenne pepper provide 47% of the daily value for vitamin A. Often called the anti-infection vitamin, vitamin A is essential for healthy epithelial tissues including the mucous membranes that line the nasal passages, lungs, intestinal tract and urinary tract and serve as the body's first line of defense against invading pathogens.
Echinacea is a classic member of the antiviral herbs. Not only does it fight viral and bacterial infection, it also stimulates the white blood cells and is good for the immune system. Use both the leaves and the roots of this plant.
Black elderberry (Sambucas nigra) is another herbs to keep handy during the cold and flu season. Elderberry has antiviral activity against influenza viruses and enhances immune function. A proprietary elderberry extract (Sambucol®) significantly shortens the severity and duration of influenza.
Garlic (Allium sativum)has broad activity against a number of organisms and also promotes immune function. People around the globe have used the bulb as food and medicine for thousands of years. Four French thieves added to garlic’s fame by staying alive as they either robbed or interred (the story varies) victims of the plague. Their alleged secret? Internal and external use of a vinegar made of garlic and other antimicrobial herbs. This ‘vinaigre des quatre voleurs’ is still sold in France.

Garlic has antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Proteus, Pseudomonas, Mycobacterium, as well as species associated with diarrhea (Escherichia coli, Salmonella, Clostridium, Klebsiella, Bacillus subtilis). Happily, though somewhat mysteriously, garlic interferes with disease-causing bacteria, rather than the “friendly” bacteria such as Lactobacillus that colonize the intestines.
Garlic also tackles fungi (Candida, Cryptococcus, Trichophyton) and parasites such as (Giardia lamblia, Entamoeba histolytica,Trypanosomes, Leishmania).
Genuine licorice root, not that red candy that shares the same name, has been a key ingredient in most Chinese herbal formulas for more than 3,000 years. Research indicates that licorice’s two primary ingredients-glycyrrhizin and glycyrrhetinic acid–boost production of interferon. Active ingredients- hypericin and pseudohypericin, are phytochemicals that display strong antiviral properties enough to overpower herpes simplex viruses type 1 and 2, certain flu viruses (influenza A and B), and EBV.
Ginger (Zingiber officinale) has scientific backing as an anti-nausea agent. It may offer other benefits to those stricken with infections diarrhea. Alcohol extracts of ginger are active against bacteria that infect the intestinal tract (Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli, Vibrio cholerae Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Helicobacter pylori), skin and other soft tissues (Staphylococcus aureus), and respiratory tract (Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae). Ginger has antifungal activity against the yeast Candida albicans. It also discourages intestinal worms. Because studies have shown that heat deactivates the antibacterial effect, it may be best to consume ginger raw, or in tincture or capsule form.
Organic Ginger Root
Yarrow is one of the antiviral herbs that is also anti-inflammatory, improves blood clotting and increases perspiration. Use the entire yarrow plant except for the roots.


We have now added even more Certified Organic Herbs.  These are VERY popular and we expect to sell-out quickly.  Orders available now!  Organic Herb orders will ship within 4 business days of purchase.  Orders of 2 or more herb varieties will ship via USPS Priority Mail.

DIY Tincture Kits are also available and ship via USPS Priority Mail.

Important note: This article is not intended as a substitute for the advise of a health care professional. Some microbes are incredibly virulent. And some people are more vulnerable than others. Microbes innocuous in hardier folk can be lead to life-threatening infections in people with compromised immunity. Newborn babies are vulnerable because their immune systems are immature. Elders face declining immune function. In the face of overwhelming infection, antibiotics can save lives. In other instances, antibiotic treatment may help prevent complications. 

Sources
http://www.herbco.com/t-herbs-infection.aspx
http://www.organic-gardening-and-homesteading.com/antiviral-herbs.html
http://www.curejoy.com/content/powerful-herbs-fight-viruses-antibiotics-fail/
http://www.crazyfortea.com/antiviralherbs.html


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